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Still Waters

Thanksgiving: Meet the turkey's family

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It's nearly Thanksgiving and time to talk turkey, but these birds are more than just a holiday tradition.

From elaborate courtship displays to flying, here are some surprising facts you may not have known about the dinnertime favorite.

The wild turkey has six subspecies and a glamorous cousin from Central America. What better time than Thanksgiving to meet the whole family?

https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/11/turkeys-holidays-animals-thanksgiving-nation/

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We have a lot of wild turkey around here. It's not uncommon to see a couple or few in the grass along the side of the road, particularly at certain times of year. I get rafters of 6-12, and sometimes bigger ones up to 20 turkeys walking through my yard. Have had the beejeebers scared out of me by scaring them into flight a couple times too- those guys can really get up into the trees. And they are weird and ungainly in their flight- I think it's where some cryptid sightings come from.

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We had a lot of turkeys at our favorite camp spot in the Arizona mountains. Here is a short video of a family of them.

 

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9 minutes ago, .ZZ. said:

We had a lot of turkeys at our favorite camp spot in the Arizona mountains. Here is a short video of a family of them.

 

Eeep :wub: I love it when there's tall grass and the babies peep in and out of the grass like that.

Edit to add a funny turkey camping story. There's a group of us that used to go camping in the late summer at a park in SE Wisconsin. One of our buddies is notorious for his awful snoring. There was a year that early in the morning we slowly woke up in our tents to hear his snoring as usual- and some turkeys that apparently thought he was a turkey call. The "conversation" went on for a while as we all realized we were all awake in our tents giggling about it. Somebody finally got up and left their tent, and apparently that was enough to scare the turkeys off.

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I was one of the 4H kids that rode around with collection can to bring wild turkeys back to Southern New Jersey. There was a load of them around here but the coyotes thinned them out.

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I'v never seen a wild turkey but they are kind of pretty looking. It would be like eating a super model 

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I always like to play with perspectives in my head about these things as I find it weird, if not almost hypocritical how we would view it so differently if say a higher intelligent species were to raise humans for a consumption during a holiday tradition. We think of this bird, we think words like delicious or associate it to memorable and happy moments or visuals but not so if it were the other way despite how nature works in regards to the food chain. It goes from a happy type thought when it's us eating the bird to a level of disgust, shock or even anger if it's another species eating us. No wonder we annihilate anything that threatens our survival. Thank goodness Turkey's can't fight back.

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Turkeys: the proposed national bird of the early United States of America, because Benjamin Franklin knew we love to eat them and they're native to North America. However, the colonists realized turkeys aren't strong animals, compared to predatory American bald eagles, which became the national bird. 

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