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Still Waters

Unusual hummingbird hawk moth 'defies myths'

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Here's something you won't see every day - while it looks like a bird, this little creature is actually a moth.

A hummingbird hawk moth, to be exact. And it was captured on camera in a garden in Annalong, County Down.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/uk-northern-ireland-42097984/unusual-hummingbird-hawk-moth-defies-myths

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I saw one in the garden before. It did look like an odd hummingbird took us a few to figure out it was a moth.

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I've never seen one but would like to.

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We see them quite regularly around here because there's lots of valerian, which they love. The first time I saw one I thought it was a tiny bird. My mind was telling me it couldn't possibly be but my eyes were telling me it was! Apparently they come over from France but don't breed here.

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Slow motion (6X) for a better glimpse ...

~

 

[00.01:17]

~

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Thanks for that video, Mr Eye :D 

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What a curious creature. You'd think it would use up more energy getting nectar from those flowers, than the nectar would actually produce on digestion.

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3 minutes ago, ouija ouija said:

Thanks for that video, Mr Eye :D 

Most welcome Aunty Weej ...

~ :yes:

 

 

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Just now, RoofGardener said:

What a curious creature. You'd think it would use up more energy getting nectar from those flowers, than the nectar would actually produce on digestion.

I thought that too. I was getting tired just watching him! I found myself wishing he would sit down for a minute :lol:

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6 hours ago, ouija ouija said:

I thought that too. I was getting tired just watching him! I found myself wishing he would sit down for a minute :lol:

Ha.... you just gave me a mental image of the moth going back to his Moth-mansion (Mothsion ? ), sitting down in his Comfy Chair, and putting all his feet up with a cup of cocoa ! :D 

 

*Edit*.... oh.. and with about 8 foot-stools :) 

Edited by RoofGardener
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Tomato worms = Hummingbird moths

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31 minutes ago, Twin said:

Tomato worms = Hummingbird moths

Nope. The OP is about hummingbird hawk moths, those are not native to he America’s. They also don’t eat nightshades but prefer rubia. Hummingbird moths of the U.S. is aka  whiteline sphinx, eats flowers and fruits, but not noted to eat nightshades. The two hornworms that eat nightshades are the Carolina sphinx, aka tobacco hornworm, and the five spotted hawkmoth, aka tomato hornworm.

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12 hours ago, RoofGardener said:

*Edit*.... oh.. and with about 8 foot-stools :) 

That's one giant squat ...

~

*Sorry ... just ... could ... not ... resist *

:P

~

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I saw one when on holiday in Norfolk. Amazing creature.

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In the early 1990's I've seen those at my dacha here in the central Siberia. Around the same time there also was a note in some local newspaper with another witness account, from a guy who mistaken these for actual hummingbirds. Since then I have never seen them.

Edited by Chaldon
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On 11/24/2017 at 7:43 AM, Nnicolette said:

I saw one in the garden before. It did look like an odd hummingbird took us a few to figure out it was a moth.

I only saw one once in my life and always wondered why I didn't ever see another one

 

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Woops

Edited by Nnicolette

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On 11/24/2017 at 9:33 PM, rashore said:

Nope. The OP is about hummingbird hawk moths, those are not native to he America’s. They also don’t eat nightshades but prefer rubia. Hummingbird moths of the U.S. is aka  whiteline sphinx, eats flowers and fruits, but not noted to eat nightshades. The two hornworms that eat nightshades are the Carolina sphinx, aka tobacco hornworm, and the five spotted hawkmoth, aka tomato hornworm.

They are both native to america.

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We often see one or two hoying it round the buddelia in the garden each year in the summer but soon as I go to take a photo the're gone

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1 hour ago, Matt221 said:

We often see one or two hoying it round the buddelia in the garden each year in the summer but soon as I go to take a photo the're gone

Probably UFO, ghost or alien hummingbird hawk moths ... or maybe they're shy ... like me ...

~

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