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seeder

Alien Bacteria outside the ISS?

36 posts in this topic

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_KB_

who is to say that it's not bacteria from earth that evolved to better survive in space

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Brok
17 hours ago, Aquila King said:

Am I the only killjoy here who'd be kinda 'meh' about alien microbes? :mellow:

No, but you're the minority. Or at least I hope so. I would definitely lose what little faith I have left in humanity if the majority of the public failed to comprehend the significance, implications and importance of the discovery of alien life.

Edited by Brok
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Aquila King
34 minutes ago, Brok said:

No, but you're the minority. Or at least I hope so. I would definitely lose what little faith I have left in humanity if the majority of the public failed to comprehend the significance, implications and importance of the discovery of alien life.

Guys, everyone, listen...

Stop taking everything everyone says so damn seriously.

If you quoted my following sentence that you edited out, it should be clear that I'm casually joking around.

Of course I understand the significance of such a discovery. I'm not that dense.

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Sundew

Just seems much more likely it's Earth bacteria, not all of which have been identified, I would guess. After all, it's a long way between worlds and the radiation, cold and dryness is not conducive to living organisms, especially over eons of time required for something to drift from one planet, or even solar system, to another. 

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seanjo

Interesting...if live bacteria has been found and, as is more likely, it is Earth originated, this will have implications for exploration of other planets and moons. For instance, we melt our way through Europas ice into the Sea below and some of these bacteria are living on the probe, what effect will that have on any ecology that might exist? If there is none, then maybe these bacteria will start one...Do we have the right to contaminate other planets living ecology?

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flabbins

Just the news that bacteria can live in space whether it be from here or elsewhere? Surely that's big news?

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Jon the frog
18 minutes ago, flabbins said:

Just the news that bacteria can live in space whether it be from here or elsewhere? Surely that's big news?

Yeah, something living outside in space is quite big news, it just explode the frontier of life. The level of radiation they endure are probably high and it they live and not survive, it's a big wow !

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paperdyer
On ‎11‎/‎27‎/‎2017 at 10:26 PM, ChrLzs said:

Seeder, you do understand this was on TASS / Russia Today?

Yes, those tests are most certainly needed........ Indeed, you'd think a good scientist would have done those tests, which are relatively quick and simple, before making ass-umptions....

Thinking about it.  The tests may prove nothing.  Scientists believe bacteria came from space to Earth which started life here.  Unless the strain is drastically different from any Earth "cousins", we still may not know.

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ChrLzs
On 11/29/2017 at 11:14 PM, Jon the frog said:

Yeah, something living outside in space is quite big news, it just explode the frontier of life. The level of radiation they endure are probably high and it they live and not survive, it's a big wow !

Search 'tardigrade'.  You may not be amazed, but they're pretty impressive and show what's possible, and there are other examples of things that are very difficult to kill....

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Hazzard

Rather than microbes raining down from outer space, its much more plausible that the outside of the space station became contaminated by earthly organisms, many of which can survive in the harsh environment in orbit.

https://wonderopolis.org/wonder/can-germs-live-in-outer-space

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Mr Supertypo

A mutant earth bacteria? The old MIR had a devastating mutant fungi infestation. Cosmonauts could smell them as soon they went in the station.

Edited by Mr Supertypo

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