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Worms can live and reproduce in Mars soil

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Then they would have to be adjusted to be "sub-breathers."

 

 

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ALARM !!!! Thread pollution warning!

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The future visitors of mars will have to deal with giant sandworms. The spice must flow.

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I am curious how close this is to actual Martian soil. Presumably they got data from the various landers. I remember somewhere reading the soil was highly acidic and given its red color I would assume that it's high in iron or iron oxides. 

Seems like it would be difficult to produce enough water and enough pressurized, insulated greenhouse space to make sustainability a reality. I know there's water ice at the poles but those regions are even colder (and with less sunlight) than the rest of Mars, which isn't exactly balmy. 

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i sincerely hope that that cost little more than a bag of fertilizer + minimum wage for someone to write down what's happening and make a summary... though my nasa senses are telling me that this cost thousands of dollars

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What about Perchlorate then?

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35 minutes ago, _KB_ said:

i sincerely hope that that cost little more than a bag of fertilizer + minimum wage for someone to write down what's happening and make a summary... though my nasa senses are telling me that this cost thousands of dollars

Whatever "nasa senses" should mean here, its obvious that the experiments aim wasnt understood by you.

Edited by toast
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10 minutes ago, toast said:

Whatever "nasa senses" should mean here, its obvious that the experiments aim wasnt understood by you.

the aim is pretty clear, what i'm wondering about is the price tag

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13 minutes ago, _KB_ said:

the aim is pretty clear, what i'm wondering about is the price tag

For NASA: zero.

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8 hours ago, toast said:

For NASA: zero.

for the tax payer though? because my issue with nasa is all the embezzlement, i mean nasa would usually ask a couple grand for a project like this, like have you actually looked up how much this cost?

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2 hours ago, _KB_ said:

for the tax payer though? because my issue with nasa is all the embezzlement, i mean nasa would usually ask a couple grand for a project like this, like have you actually looked up how much this cost?

Embezzlement? I think your general issue with NASA is that you dont have a clue about this organization, its projects and its structure of financing. I you had read the article linked in this thread, which you dont, you maybe would have understood that the worm experiment was performed by a university in the Netherlands and that the experiment was financed by crowdfunding. And yes, I know the approximate costs for the experiment (for the university in the Netherlands) but as I`m not your web search monkey, you should investigate by yourself, and, prior to comment on something with unfounded allegations.

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22 minutes ago, toast said:

Embezzlement? I think your general issue with NASA is that you dont have a clue about this organization, its projects and its structure of financing. I you had read the article linked in this thread, which you dont, you maybe would have understood that the worm experiment was performed by a university in the Netherlands and that the experiment was financed by crowdfunding. And yes, I know the approximate costs for the experiment (for the university in the Netherlands) but as I`m not your web search monkey, you should investigate by yourself, and, prior to comment on something with unfounded allegations.

oh yeah didn't notice that, i really need a nap

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Darn. I love spinach.

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First of all...it is NOT Martian soil. Secondly, Martian soil has no nutrients of any kind in it.
Thirdly, Mars has no atmosphere that would support life.
Consequently, and fourthly...because life exists only by the death of life....The only way you could get Earthworms to live in Martian Soil would be to bring the Martian Soil to Earth and then add the essential life giving nutrients...i.e....dead life.

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1 hour ago, joc said:

Secondly, Martian soil has no nutrients of any kind in it.
 

 

I bet you wished you looked that up first

 

Quote

 

In June, 2008, the Phoenix Lander returned data showing Martian soil to be slightly alkaline and containing vital nutrients such as magnesium, sodium, potassium and chloride, all of which are necessary for living organisms to grow.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martian_soil


 

 

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13 hours ago, joc said:

First of all...it is NOT Martian soil.

Known already and nobody claimed it to be.

Quote

Secondly, Martian soil has no nutrients of any kind in it.
Thirdly, Mars has no atmosphere that would support life.
Consequently, and fourthly...because life exists only by the death of life....The only way you could get Earthworms to live in Martian Soil would be to bring the Martian Soil to Earth and then add the essential life giving nutrients...i.e....dead life.

You are the second one here who didnt understood the experiments aim but I will give you a little help. For starters like you:

Quote

...  the Red Planet is covered with regolith: crushed volcanic rock containing nothing organic. But it does contain some toxic chemicals, adding to the complexity of the challenge at hand.

The 100 pounds of Martian soil simulant being used at Florida Tech comes from Hawaii and was chosen based on spectral data from Mars orbiters. It will be a common simulant used for testing the performance of the hardware systems used to grow plants. The Florida Tech team will experiment with which and how much nutrients should be added to the simulant for optimal plant growth of various crops

During a 3.5-week pilot study, Drew Palmer, a professor of biochemistry and chemical ecology at Florida Tech, and Brooke Wheeler, an ecologist and professor in the College of Aeronautics at Florida Tech, grew lettuce plants in three conditions: one in simulant, one in simulant with added nutrients, and one in potting soil. The study began with 30 seeds planted in the simulant-only tubes, and ended with only half as many; although they tasted the same as the others, their roots were not as strong as the potting soil plants.

This preliminary research also found that germination rates were two to three days slower than in control groups, and therefore it’s important to gain an understanding of how the timelines involved in Martian farming differ from growth times on Earth.

According to Fritsche, this study will document and publish scientific data on growing plants in a widely available Martian simulant, providing a control for future studies.

Some of the plants they may try to grow during the nine-month test include radishes, Swiss chard, kale, Chinese cabbage, snow peas, dwarf peppers and tomatoes — all nutritious foods and, more importantly, all tested and selected menu items for astronauts.

NASA link

 

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For earth worms to survive in any soil requires micro-organisms for them to eat. So is NASA confirming life in the Martian soil?

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24 minutes ago, readerlurker said:

For earth worms to survive in any soil requires micro-organisms for them to eat. So is NASA confirming life in the Martian soil?

Read. The. #%@!ng. Article.

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Now that I think about it. This is really awesome. I mean using a combination of martian soil, human waste (processed) and worms to further mix the soil. This could potential solve quite a few mars mission issues. Plus if it came down to it the worms could be a protein source. 

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On ‎11‎/‎28‎/‎2017 at 2:14 PM, XenoFish said:

The future visitors of mars will have to deal with giant sandworms. The spice must flow.

Either you wanted Dune too many times or the old B&W Outer Limits. Outer Limits probably stole the idea from Dune.

 

Oh and I guess we won't have to worry about seeing Popeye on Mars.  The import price of spinach would be astronomical.

Edited by paperdyer
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Just now, paperdyer said:

Either you wanted Dune too many times or the old B&W Outer Limits. Outer Limits probably stole the idea from Dune.

I've read to books enough times that the pages were falling out of them.:D

Plus it was a joke based on the topic.

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I realized that.  I'm more than slightly crazy

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great....we spend millions of $$$$$$$$$$ to see if worms can screw on mars...yay.

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16 minutes ago, mackbolin said:

great....we spend millions of $$$$$$$$$$ to see if worms can screw on mars...yay.

Hardly millions, maybe a thousand if they really pushed the envelope.

Its important for any future colonizing attempts. Worms are part of soil renewal for farming. 

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