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seeder

Yeti mystery finally solved?

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seeder
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Yeti mystery is finally solved: DNA evidence suggests ancient samples of the 'abominable snowman' belong to bears

    Sightings of the Yeti or abominable snowman have been reported for centuries
    Now, a DNA study is providing insight into the origins of the Himalayan legend
    Experts analysed specimens - including bone, skin, hair and faecal samples
    The findings showed that one was from a dog and the other eight were from Asian black bears, Himalayan brown bears or Tibetan brown bears


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-5125347/DNA-evidence-suggests-Yetis-Asian-bears-dogs.html#ixzz4zmiU6yua

 

 

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Carnoferox

I've checked out a couple of articles relating to this study, and all of the links given to the original paper in Proceedings of the Royal Society B don't work. A search on the Proceedings of the Royal Society B website turns up no results either. I wonder if the paper has since been retracted.

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seeder
3 minutes ago, Carnoferox said:

I've checked out a couple of articles relating to this study, and all of the links given to the original paper in Proceedings of the Royal Society B don't work. A search on the Proceedings of the Royal Society B website turns up no results either. I wonder if the paper has since been retracted.

 

here you go

https://www.google.co.uk/search?client=firefox-b&dcr=0&ei=pCIeWuiWJszpUtrqoegK&q=Dr+Charlotte+Lindqvist%2C+yeti&oq=Dr+Charlotte+Lindqvist%2C+yeti&gs_l=psy-ab.3...3166.4855.0.5325.6.6.0.0.0.0.120.497.5j1.6.0....0...1c.1.64.psy-ab..0.5.425...0i22i30k1j33i21k1j33i160k1.0.3ATppRBTPFc

 

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Carnoferox

It appears that the study will actually be published tomorrow according to the press release.

http://www.buffalo.edu/news/releases/2017/11/037.html

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oldrover

Is this the one who was so restrained, yet so disdainful of the earlier Sykes yeti/bear/ancient polar bear debacle? That was great.

Edited by oldrover
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Myles

It seems they put forth the effort and got results.   Pretty damming for the believers.  

Of course it is not 100%, but sure explains these sightings.

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stereologist

Quite interesting. I'm not surprised. One misidentifcation leads to a suggestive state for others to misidentify.

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oldrover
26 minutes ago, stereologist said:

Quite interesting. I'm not surprised. One misidentifcation leads to a suggestive state for others to misidentify.

But it depends on which 'yeti' you mean, the various local traditions, or the modern Western appropriation of them. 

I really don't think the yeti has anything to do with bears, or sightings of anything. If you read really early British accounts, as in pre Origin of the Species ..., you get a primitive tribesman/giant human type thing, it's only later after the whole evolution/man ape/missing link becomes a morbid point of fascination for the public at large do man beasts, as in ape men, start coming into peopls's minds. 

The original local idea is of a semi religous spiritual type animal. So that's based on belief and culture more than misidentification.

Edited by oldrover
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Podo

Yetis are bears. That makes perfect sense, really. Bears look humanish when they stand up, especially when in poor visibility conditions.

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Guyver
22 minutes ago, Podo said:

Yetis are bears. That makes perfect sense, really. Bears look humanish when they stand up, especially when in poor visibility conditions.

That's the conclusion that Reinhold Messner has reached....and he is not only a completely awesome individual, but he has encountered the yeti twice himself.  

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stereologist

My wife says I look like a bear - even in good lighting conditions.

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_KB_

No it's the people who whenever they see any animal they don't know yell out "bigfoot"

Edited by _KB_
WHY DOES THE NORMAL WEBSITE (not the forum) KEEP SHORTENING MY POSTS WHEN USE QUOTES???
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highdesert50

Nice example of Ockam's Razor favoring simpler theories that are more testable.

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Woodwose

All this tells me is that the region can support multiple species of large mammalian omnivores, if anything this is encouragement for those looking for the ecological niche that such a creature would fill. I still personally believe that the Yeti was Homo Denisova which we know passed on the genes allowing for greater blood hemoglobin levels to the modern human population of Tibet, maybe as recently as 7000 years ago. If that's the case then theres no reason oral history/tradition couldn't have lasted that long. (the gene passed between Denisovans and modern Tibetans was called EPAS1)

Edited by Woodwose
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Myles
2 hours ago, Woodwose said:

All this tells me is that the region can support multiple species of large mammalian omnivores, if anything this is encouragement for those looking for the ecological niche that such a creature would fill. I still personally believe that the Yeti was Homo Denisova which we know passed on the genes allowing for greater blood hemoglobin levels to the modern human population of Tibet, maybe as recently as 7000 years ago. If that's the case then theres no reason oral history/tradition couldn't have lasted that long. (the gene passed between Denisovans and modern Tibetans was called EPAS1)

Welcome Woodwose!

It should also tell you that the people who believed they had physical evidence of the Yeti were mistaken. 

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Woodwose
6 minutes ago, Myles said:

Welcome Woodwose!

It should also tell you that the people who believed they had physical evidence of the Yeti were mistaken. 

Thank you for the welcome Myles, I totally agree and am not in anyway contesting the findings of the study. Just pointing out the fact that this region would theoretically be able to support said creatures. My working hypothesis is simply that Homo Denisova (or a closely related as yet undiscovered hominid) is responsible for the humanoid Yeti legends as i'm sure the local people can tell the difference between a bear and a massive hairy person, and that the stories of these likely now Extinct creatures/people have persisted in folklore for millennia to the modern day. Throw in western obsession with monsters, Exploration and generally thinking we know better than the locals and the result is this convoluted mess we have now.

 

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Woodwose

Apologies for linking a daily mail article, but the idea of truly ancient information surviving thousands of years via folklore ins't to be ignored. imagine if the native Canadians/ Americans brought these tales with them across the land bridge from East Asia. Could go a ways to explaining the legends surrounding American Cryptids. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2929775/Aboriginal-folklore-oldest-accurate-oral-history-world-Stories-ancient-sea-level-rise-survived-10-000-years.html

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Carnoferox
3 hours ago, Woodwose said:

Thank you for the welcome Myles, I totally agree and am not in anyway contesting the findings of the study. Just pointing out the fact that this region would theoretically be able to support said creatures. My working hypothesis is simply that Homo Denisova (or a closely related as yet undiscovered hominid) is responsible for the humanoid Yeti legends as i'm sure the local people can tell the difference between a bear and a massive hairy person, and that the stories of these likely now Extinct creatures/people have persisted in folklore for millennia to the modern day. Throw in western obsession with monsters, Exploration and generally thinking we know better than the locals and the result is this convoluted mess we have now.

 

I'd highly doubt that the yeti would be a Denisovan, as what is known about Denisovans really doesn't match the typical description of the yeti. I'm always confused why people try to shoehorn existing hominid species that don't match into cryptohominids when it could easily be a completely new genus and species.

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oldrover
3 hours ago, Woodwose said:

Apologies for linking a daily mail article, but the idea of truly ancient information surviving thousands of years via folklore ins't to be ignored. imagine if the native Canadians/ Americans brought these tales with them across the land bridge from East Asia. Could go a ways to explaining the legends surrounding American Cryptids. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2929775/Aboriginal-folklore-oldest-accurate-oral-history-world-Stories-ancient-sea-level-rise-survived-10-000-years.html

I don't agree with you overall, but I do see points which I do sort of agree with.

This idea of long persisting folk memories though, firstly, like man beast myths, most cultures have a lost land to the sea myth, we have one locally, and it's true that the Bristol Channel was once the forest etc that the stories tell of, but that's not why we tell it today. Also, if this was the case, why has all trace of the thylacine disappeared from Australian Aboriginal tradition after only around 3,500 years? 

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oldrover
12 minutes ago, Carnoferox said:

I'd highly doubt that the yeti would be a Denisovan, as what is known about Denisovans really doesn't match the typical description of the yeti. I'm always confused why people try to shoehorn existing hominid species that don't match into cryptohominids when it could easily be a completely new genus and species.

To Change the subject slightly, I've just finished the draft. Only took 10 months. Now the references 

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Carnoferox
2 minutes ago, oldrover said:

To Change the subject slightly, I've just finished the draft. Only took 10 months. Now the references 

Referencing should be fun with all the information you've included. 

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oldrover
7 minutes ago, Carnoferox said:

Referencing should be fun with all the information you've included. 

Oh yeah. I'm saving it for an extra Christmas treat. 

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