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Age of Christ's tomb revealed

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Age of 'Christ's tomb' is revealed: Mortar used in the complex dates to Rome's first Christian emperor suggesting it really IS where 'Jesus was buried and resurrected'

    It lends weight to the belief Christ was buried and resurrected in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre
    Until now, the earliest architectural evidence found in the tomb complex dated to the Crusader period
    Mortar from between limestone surface of tomb and a marble slab that covers it has been dated to 345 AD
    New date puts the construction of the tomb in the time of Constantine, Rome's first Christian emperor
    It provides proof that the spot pilgrims worship is the same tomb found by Constantine in 4th century


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-5124853/Experts-date-Jerusalem-tomb-Jesus-Roman-times.html#ixzz4zmr5TFts


 

 

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herbygant

Just another Roman monument.  "Tomb of Jesus", no proof.

Edited by herbygant
typo
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eight bits

First things first. There is little or no credible evidence that Constantine was ever a Christian. If he did join, then tradition has it that he was dunked on his death bed (on the other hand, "death bed conversion" is a Christian literary form in its own right, generally shelved under Fiction). What he did was to make all religions legal to practice in his Empire, and so Christianity became legal to practice there.

That worked out neatly, because Constantine's mother, Helena, was a devout Christian. In the 320's, she made a grand tour of the Holy Land, wishing to see for herself the actual places associated with the Jesus story. Accompanying her on the journey was more money than you or I will ever see in one place. Thus, if Helen wanted to acquire the True Cross, then a true-enough cross was presented to her, with a suitable price tag attached. Ka-ching.

So, the designation of a particular place where this happened or that happened to Jesus should date from Helen's time, or shortly afterwards, when the church building projects she commisssioned and bankrolled were completed.

Even if we accept that there ever was an interesting First Century "Jesus" figure (as I suppose we must here at S,R and B), there is no evidence that anybody maintained for 300 years a catalog or atlas of the places he frequented. Recall that Jerusalem was sacked twice between Pilate's time and Helena's, and was paved over both before and after the second time.

Dating construction material to Helena's time or shortly afterwards confirms what we already know from documentary evidence. That's interesting and useful complementation, but uninformative about what did or didn't happen about three centuries earlier than that.

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herbygant

Eight Bits, you are well informed and I enjoyed your thesis. On that basis then, it seems likely that this was a monument to the acceptance of religious diversity, with Christianity being very topical at that time, but not necessarily, wholly about Christianity.

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eight bits

herbygant

Thank you for the kind words.

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 On that basis then, it seems likely that this was a monument to the acceptance of religious diversity, with Christianity being very topical at that time, but not necessarily, wholly about Christianity.

I wouldn't be surprised if Constantine and his mother saw that issue differently. Helena seems all about promoting Christianity, while her son may have been thinking "good government" according to Roman traditions of civic virtue, which included a fair degree of religious toleration.

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third_eye

Ancient ROME likes and accepts all kinds of deities and religion. Just another and more reasons to have festive banquets and orgies I guess, not so much the Judaism or early Christians though, what with the monotheistic insistence, which to the Romans seems to be quite intolerant of other religions ... among other things ...

While we are on this track of little Constantine and how Christianity beat that overall ban on them by the Empire ...
 

Quote

 

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The Donation of Constantine: The Great Forgery

Though the Roman Catholic Church admits that the Donation of Constantine was a forgery, but it still claims that the pope "by reason of his office as Vicar of ...
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The Donation of Constantine (756 CE) - The Museum of Hoaxes

hoaxes.org/archive/permalink/the_donation_of_constantine
The Donation of Constantine was a document supposedly written by emperor Constantine (285-337 A.D.) granting the Catholic Church ownership of vast ...
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Lorenzo Valla Proves that the Donation of Constantine is a Forgery ...

www.historyofinformation.com/expanded.php?id=2172

A depiction of the Donation of Constantine in the Apostolic Palace, Vatican City, ... Because of church opposition the essay was not formally published in print ...

~

 

 

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jarjarbinks
16 hours ago, third_eye said:

Ancient ROME likes and accepts all kinds of deities and religion. Just another and more reasons to have festive banquets and orgies I guess, not so much the Judaism or early Christians though, what with the monotheistic insistence, which to the Romans seems to be quite intolerant of other religions ... among other things ...

While we are on this track of little Constantine and how Christianity beat that overall ban on them by the Empire ...
 

 

Yeah they accepted everyone, all their religion and beliefs, became too soft and got owned by invaders and it was the end.

looks like history is going to repeat itself...

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third_eye
13 minutes ago, jarjarbinks said:

Yeah they accepted everyone, all their religion and beliefs, became too soft and got owned by invaders and it was the end.

looks like history is going to repeat itself...

Not really ... if anything it was their incessant need to War just to keep the Aristocrats and Nobles well fed and wealthy that stretched them out thin ... not to mention the Insane Rulers and Dictators splitting up the Empire when it was nothing left but an empty shell ... those early Christians just took advantage by being more true to the Roman creed and greed than the Romans themselves ...

Hmmmm maybe you do have a point there ...

~

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paperdyer

OK So it's only really 1817 or did Jesus burial place keep getting moved as in Poltergeist? Enquiring Minds Want to Know!

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niteskywatcher

So it is basically a bogus tourist attraction..created 1800 years ago to attract early Christians..

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