Jump to content
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Carnoferox

T. rex Vocalization Recreated

19 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

 
ChaosRose

Those people annoyed me by talking over it. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tmcom

Talking over what?

Sounds like a baby blowing bubbles.

Let's hope that Spielberg ignores this.

B)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bee
1 hour ago, tmcom said:

Talking over what?

Sounds like a baby blowing bubbles.

Let's hope that Spielberg ignores this.

B)

 

haha yes -

it was funny when she said... isn't that the scariest sound you ever heard and he paused and then politely replied..

'the scariest sound I ever felt --'

it sounded like a woodpecker or at worst a sleepy lion waking up to me... :)

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tmcom
18 minutes ago, bee said:

 

haha yes -

it was funny when she said... isn't that the scariest sound you ever heard and he paused and then politely replied..

'the scariest sound I ever felt --'

it sounded like a woodpecker or at worst a sleepy lion waking up to me... :)

 

Yes,  the scariest sound l ever heard, is translated to "l want to rake in as much money as possible from TY views, by pushing the baby blowing bubbles sound".

I would say that if l heard a dinosaur make those sounds, l would want to get up a ladder and slap him about?

:o

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
stevewinn

Jurassic World Fallen Kingdom Trailer. hear some proper Dino's. :lol:

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tmcom
1 hour ago, stevewinn said:

Jurassic World Fallen Kingdom Trailer. hear some proper Dino's. :lol:

 

Yes, imagine if T-rex is replaced by that, the franchise would die a quicker death than The Hunger Games, part 113.

:sleepy:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bee

 

I think that T Rex and any other dinosaur with the little 'arms' will turn out to be some kind of prehistoric flightless bird -

But the atmosphere then could have been 'thicker' and the wings could have been used for low level gliding .. ?
rather than higher flight -

The guttural clicking  of the T Rex reconstruction sound reminded me a bit of a crow.. they have quite a vocal
range and some of it is guttural like that --

had a quick look at bird skeletons for comparison with T Rex and picked this one for an example -- the extinct Elephant Bird - 

 

link

Aepyornis maximus.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Carnoferox

Despite your doubts, this is most likely what a T. rex would sound like. Vocalizations would be limited to low bellows and hisses similar to crocodilians because non-avialan dinosaurs lacked a syrinx.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bee

 

I've now had another listen through some decent headphones and I wasn't hearing it right when I made my other post
about a woodpecker or sleepy lion :) 

NOW I've heard it better I'm going more for it sounding a bit like a whale.. that deep resonance that carries a long
way through water --

which fits in nicely with what I said about the possible 'thick atmosphere' in times past and T Rex maybe being some kind of
flightless bird that glided and had bouyancy rather than high flight -

Nothing as big as the biggest dinosaurs could live on earth now because our atmosphere wouldn't allow it with gravity being
different -

did T Rex communicate with that whale ish sound because it works well in an atmosphere as thick as or nearly as thick as water ?

link about Thick Atmosphere Theory

It may be hard to imagine that the Earth’s air could be so thick that its density would be comparable to water. Nevertheless, there is no reason why a gas can not be compressed so much that it has properties similar to that of a liquid, and in fact compressing a gas into a liquid is a common industrial process.

In order to compress the air near the Earth’s surface, there has to be a substantial amount of overlapping air pressing down on the ground level air. Thus the high density ground level air is evidence of an extremely thick Mesozoic atmosphere.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bee


I think that Whale ish sound of T Rex adds some more weight to the Dinosaur / Thick atmosphere theory --

I don't think a land animal in our atmosphere would make that kind of sound -

 

home page of thick atmosphere / dinosaur theory

DinosaurTheory gives the solution to the paradox of how the dinosaurs and pterosaurs grew so large. Solving the large dinosaur paradox is an important scientific achievement and yet DinosaurTheory is much more than just a discussion about dinosaurs. This is because the large dinosaur paradox has existed for centuries so that now it is entangled with numerous other science incongruities and misconceptions and this has caused considerable confusion. All of this confusion needs to be sorted out so that science can move forward.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Carnoferox
8 hours ago, bee said:

 

I've now had another listen through some decent headphones and I wasn't hearing it right when I made my other post
about a woodpecker or sleepy lion :) 

NOW I've heard it better I'm going more for it sounding a bit like a whale.. that deep resonance that carries a long
way through water --

which fits in nicely with what I said about the possible 'thick atmosphere' in times past and T Rex maybe being some kind of
flightless bird that glided and had bouyancy rather than high flight -

Nothing as big as the biggest dinosaurs could live on earth now because our atmosphere wouldn't allow it with gravity being
different -

did T Rex communicate with that whale ish sound because it works well in an atmosphere as thick as or nearly as thick as water ?

link about Thick Atmosphere Theory

 

 

Yeah, no. While certainly flightless, T. rex was not a bird at all. There is also no evidence that the atmosphere was "thicker" during the Mesozoic or that the gravity was higher. The whole idea that dinosaurs were too large and could not support their weight without these conditions is pure BS.

8 hours ago, bee said:


I think that Whale ish sound of T Rex adds some more weight to the Dinosaur / Thick atmosphere theory --

I don't think a land animal in our atmosphere would make that kind of sound -

 

home page of thick atmosphere / dinosaur theory

 

Plenty of land animals make low frequency sounds. The most similar to the recreated T. rex vocalizations would be crocodilians.

Edited by Carnoferox
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bee
14 hours ago, Carnoferox said:

Yeah, no. While certainly flightless, T. rex was not a bird at all. There is also no evidence that the atmosphere was "thicker" during the Mesozoic or that the gravity was higher. The whole idea that dinosaurs were too large and could not support their weight without these conditions is pure BS.

 

I disagree - :) 

IMO I think what I said has some weight to it ^_^

and didn't you think the skeleton of the flightless Elephant Bird was interesting for comparison ?
concerning the 'little arms' - ? - which on the standard model of T Rex just don't look right  to me -
 

And then we have the feet...

comparison of T Rex and Emu feet

Comparison of T. rex and emu feet

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Carnoferox
8 hours ago, bee said:

 

I disagree - :) 

IMO I think what I said has some weight to it ^_^

and didn't you think the skeleton of the flightless Elephant Bird was interesting for comparison ?
concerning the 'little arms' - ? - which on the standard model of T Rex just don't look right  to me -
 

And then we have the feet...

comparison of T Rex and Emu feet

Comparison of T. rex and emu feet

 

T. rex is not a member of the clade Avialae, and is therefore not a bird. A recent study (Bell et al. 2017) has cast doubt on the presence of feathers in tyrannosaurids, so there is a good chance that the arms weren't even covered with feathers. Even if feathers were present, they would not cover nearly enough area to form a gliding surface large enough to get off the ground. The similarities in the foot structure are due to the fact that both are theropods, but there are some key differences. Most notable is the arctometatarsalian condition (meaning that the middle metatarsal is pinched in between the other two) in T. rex, which is not present in the emu. The small arms of flightless birds and T. rex are convergently evolved and their structure is not actually all that similar. Here is a comparison of T. rex forelimbs (top, from Lipkin & Carpenter, 2008) with an emu forelimb (bottom, from Maxwell & Larsson, 2007) :

 

Forelimb comparison.png

Edited by Carnoferox
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bee
On 12/12/2017 at 5:29 PM, Carnoferox said:

Even if feathers were present, they would not cover nearly enough area to form a gliding surface large enough to get off the ground.

 

and this is where the 'thick' atmosphere theory comes into the equation - but you are resistant to that -

enabling bouyancy and allowing a prehistoric flightless bird to use their wings for lift and gliding at low levels...

because of the shape of the T Rex head with teeth, I just had a look for something on 'prehistoric ducks with teeth' 
and this turned up!

If a prehistoric 'bird like' creature with wings for high flying could have a rounded mouth with teeth I don't see why a flightless bird like  creature couldn't -

link

Quote

An ancient relative of modern ducks and geese that skimmed the swampy wetlands of what is today England had a 16-foot wingspan and a beak full of crocodile-like teeth, scientists said on Friday.

]

ancient-goose-2.jpg

 

Edited by bee

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bee
On 12/12/2017 at 5:29 PM, Carnoferox said:

The small arms of flightless birds and T. rex are convergently evolved and their structure is not actually all that similar. Here is a comparison of T. rex forelimbs (top, from Lipkin & Carpenter, 2008) with an emu forelimb (bottom, from Maxwell & Larsson, 2007) :

thanks for your response -- 

my thoughts on that is that I wouldn't expect the T Rex and emu to be exactly the same because T Rex died out and the Emu didn't -

there must be reasons for that and perhaps that is partly down to the skeleton structure -?

Perhaps Emu type prehistoric birds were the little ones that could cope with the change in the atmosphere but all
the big prehistoric creatures couldn't .. ie size mattered in terms of surviving a thinning atmosphere ...

I don't know why you won't consider a thinning atmosphere being part of the equation why the big ones died out -

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Carnoferox
11 hours ago, bee said:

 

and this is where the 'thick' atmosphere theory comes into the equation - but you are resistant to that -

enabling bouyancy and allowing a prehistoric flightless bird to use their wings for lift and gliding at low levels...

because of the shape of the T Rex head with teeth, I just had a look for something on 'prehistoric ducks with teeth' 
and this turned up!

If a prehistoric 'bird like' creature with wings for high flying could have a rounded mouth with teeth I don't see why a flightless bird like  creature couldn't -

link

]

ancient-goose-2.jpg

 

In order for something as massive as a T. rex to be buoyant in air, the atmospheric pressure would be so high that it would crush any living thing. See the obvious problem here? 

Having teeth has nothing to do with flying capabilities. By the same logic I could say that a T. rex could fly like a bird just because they both have eyes, without considering all the anatomical characteristics that show that it couldn't fly at all. Besides, the bird in the article you linked is a pelagornithid, which don't even have real teeth. They have pseudoteeth that are just extensions of their maxillae and dentaries.

11 hours ago, bee said:

thanks for your response -- 

my thoughts on that is that I wouldn't expect the T Rex and emu to be exactly the same because T Rex died out and the Emu didn't -

there must be reasons for that and perhaps that is partly down to the skeleton structure -?

Perhaps Emu type prehistoric birds were the little ones that could cope with the change in the atmosphere but all
the big prehistoric creatures couldn't .. ie size mattered in terms of surviving a thinning atmosphere ...

I don't know why you won't consider a thinning atmosphere being part of the equation why the big ones died out -

The differences in the structure of the forelimb between T. rex and emus are because they aren't particularly closely related and because they don't have a similar ecological niche. 

An impact event was responsible for the K-Pg extinction, not a thinning atmosphere. Size did not matter in this extinction as many non-avialan dinosaur species at the end of the Cretaceous were fairly small. Not to mention the numerous families of birds and mammals that also went extinct, none of which were particularly big either.

I don't consider the "thicker atmosphere" hypothesis (or the similarly bad "lower gravity", "higher oxygen levels", and "fully aquatic dinosaurs" hypotheses) at all because it entirely relies on the misconception that dinosaurs could not support their own masses, a misconception made by people who have not actually studied dinosaurs and whose knowledge of them is terribly inaccurate. It ignores all of the extensive research published on dinosaur pneumaticity, which shows how such large sizes were possible without vastly different environmental conditions.

Edited by Carnoferox
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tatetopa

Seems to me that if those sonics started passing through my internal organs and vibrating my liver, I would be  pretty terrified.  Not really a paralyzing roar, more like the unrelenting menace of the score when Jaws approaches a swimmer.

 

To help Bee escape the problem of the super dense atmosphere:  here ya go:  An enormous gut, reduced front limbs to save weight, air sacs, a large rigid, rudder-like tail,  and consumption of large quantities of rotting meat to produces copious amounts of hydrogen and methane.  Voila, a carnivorous  Zeppelin!  I will leave it to you to imagine how altitude control and propulsion are achieved.  Suffice it to say that if a triceratops heard flatulence from above, he would have bare instants to bolt before the pounce.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tatetopa

Oh No!  I may have to abandon this thesis.  With all of the heavy bony parts on the back, poor T. rex might have been blown about belly up. Not very dignified or terrible.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.