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third_eye

Meanwhile ....

39 posts in this topic

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FLOMBIE
5 minutes ago, Piney said:

Too many syllables . We just say Skins among ourselves.:lol: 

Well, Skins refers to skin heads in Germany. :wacko:

And yeah, German words can be huge. 

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Piney
3 minutes ago, FLOMBIE said:

Well, Skins refers to skin heads in Germany. :wacko:

They make great "punching clowns".:tu:

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FLOMBIE
1 minute ago, Piney said:

They make great "punching clowns".:tu:

They do. Too bad they seem to only appear in groups. 

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Piney
Just now, FLOMBIE said:

They do. Too bad they seem to only appear in groups. 

That part makes it more enjoyable.:D

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FLOMBIE
6 hours ago, Piney said:

That part makes it more enjoyable.:D

Depends on how many are on your side, I assume. 

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Piney
Just now, FLOMBIE said:

Depends on how many are on your side, I assume. 

I'm a widowmaker logger and former chainsaw carver so 1 vs 3-6 is good odds for me. When I do have backup it's usually my baby sister. But she's a rough saddle breaker.

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FLOMBIE
Just now, Piney said:

I'm a widowmaker logger and former chainsaw carver so 1 vs 3-6 is good odds for me. When I do have backup it's usually my baby sister. But she's a rough saddle breaker.

Well, that is good to know. If there is any problem, I‘m gonna call for you, buddy, and we mess them up. :devil:

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Black Monk

Are these photos REALLY proof that polar bears are being killed by climate change? Doubts raised over claims after it emerges that no post mortem was carried out

Nicklen said that he had taken it in Svalbard in 2014 where he had encountered a number of dead bears. He went on: ‘These bears were so skinny, they appeared to have died of starvation as, in the absence of sea ice, they were not able to hunt seals . . . [Finding a dead polar bear] is now becoming much more common.’

The key word there is ‘appeared’, an admission echoed in the SeaLegacy report about the Somerset Island bear. ‘It wasn’t possible for scientists to tell us exactly what was causing this bear to starve to death,’ the accompanying text says.

But that attempt at objectivity is completely overshadowed by a headline declaring: ‘This is the face of climate change.’

The outcry is understandable — but there is just one problem with these stories. Although the bear was presumed to have died in the days following the sighting, no post mortem was carried out on it

And it is this message which has been picked up around the world, much to the anger of climate change sceptics who decry such images as ‘tragedy porn’.

Among them is Canadian evolutionary biologist and blogger Dr Susan Crockford. ‘This may be how you get gullible people to donate money to a cause but it isn’t science,’ she wrote in a post three days after the release of the video.

Others have gone further, calling the story ‘fake news’ and a ‘scam’.

While SeaLegacy and other campaigning organisations are never going to win over climate change sceptics, there are signs of a more general backlash against the Somerset Island footage. This ranges from the BBC’s restrained headline ‘Polar bear video: is it really the “face of climate change”?’ to Canada’s National Post newspaper accusing SeaLegacy of a ‘calculated public relations exercise’.

***************************************

But it’s also true that in many parts of the Arctic, including around Baffin Island, the sea ice has always melted in the summer. The grassy terrain the bear was seen staggering through is normal for that time of year.

What is striking, of course, is this bear’s dreadful physical condition — yet even that is not so unusual.

These animals are well-adapted to survive this period of seasonal famine, building up enormous reserves of fat during the spring and summer to help them survive the winter.

But the accounts of those living and working in the Arctic suggest that there have in fact been malnourished polar bears there for as long as there have been polar bears at all.

By the time this video was shot in August, the mating period would have been long over, as would their hunting season. Seals form the basis of their diet and the bear’s best chance of a kill is when a seal pops up through breathing holes in the sea ice. Without that ice to hunt on, the bears will go hungry. No one disputes that

‘These images might be shocking and disturbing, but if you talk to any kind of polar bear scientist they will tell you that this is not a new thing,’ says Dr Higdon. So too will members of the Inuit community whose ancestors are believed to have first settled in the Arctic Circle 4,000 years ago.

 
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DieChecker

I was going to post similar to what Black Monk just did. Basically there was zero done to determine CONTEXT regarding this polar bear. I read numerous articles that said this video was horrendously bad science. It almost entirely is an Appeal to Emotion.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appeal_to_emotion

Quote

Appeal to emotion or argumentum ad passiones is a logical fallacy characterized by the manipulation of the recipient's emotions in order to win an argument, especially in the absence of factual evidence.[1] This kind of appeal to emotion is a type of red herring and encompasses several logical fallacies, including appeal to consequences, appeal to fear, appeal to flattery, appeal to pity, appeal to ridicule, appeal to spite, and wishful thinking.

Instead of facts, persuasive language is used to develop the foundation of an appeal to emotion-based argument. Thus, the validity of the premises that establish such an argument does not prove to be verifiable.[2]

Appeals to emotion are intended to draw inward feelings from the acquirer of the information. And in turn, the acquirer of the information is intended to be convinced that the statements that were presented in the fallacious argument are true; solely on the basis that the statements may induce emotional stimulation such as fear, pity and joy. Though these emotions may be provoked by an appeal to emotion fallacy, effectively winning the argument, substantial proof of the argument is not offered, and the argument's premises remain invalid.[3][4][5]

This could have been a diseased bear, or an old bear, or an injured bear. All of which happen NORMALLY to polar bears. The video/article was cleverly worded to pull on people's emotions and trigger a emotional response and intent to help.

NOT... that we shouldn't help the polar bears, or be aware of the decreasing (maybe... maybe not?) polar ice sheet, but this one video/article is clearly just a emotion influence piece.

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Doug1o29
11 hours ago, Black Monk said:

Are these photos REALLY proof that polar bears are being killed by climate change? Doubts raised over claims after it emerges that no post mortem was carried out

Polar bears starving to death is nothing new.  Ups and downs in bear populations and fluctuations in habitat virtually guarantee that there are going to be some bears starving to death.  There isn't sufficient evidence to conclude that these bears are the victims of climate change.

Doug

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Timonthy
On 25/12/2017 at 2:23 AM, ChaosRose said:

Are we so certain that we can?

That we can influence the natural cycle? Yes.

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ChaosRose
Just now, Timonthy said:

That we can influence the natural cycle? Yes.

I meant are we so certain that we can adapt to changes we have made that we can survive.

The jury's out on that.

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Timonthy
12 minutes ago, ChaosRose said:

I meant are we so certain that we can adapt to changes we have made that we can survive.

The jury's out on that.

We could struggle on for a time, but less sustainable than if the environment was healthier.

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ChaosRose
Just now, Timonthy said:

We could struggle on for a time, but less sustainable than if the environment was healthier.

I would venture to say that some people have already not survived it.

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