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New group of ancient Native Americans found

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I wonder what kind of idiot theory the LDS schmucks at Brigham Young are gonna cook up for this.

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So something besides my invading ancestors wiped out this native tribe? 

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This is going to upset a few theories banking on the land route into the America's.

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Do we need to unrest any corpses we find?

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First, the actual paper:

https://www.nature.com/articles/nature25173

With the supplements:

4GZUhap.jpg

As you see in the graph a, the closest modern group are American peoples, so these Ancient Beringians and they share ancestry. This is just as I expected. If my theory is right, this group (or his cousins) is the one who brought Y-DNA haplogroup C and mt-DNA X into North American.

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Posted (edited)

11 hours ago, Jon the frog said:

Do we need to unrest any corpses we find?

Important conclusion:

"For whatever reason, while other Native American populations moved south as the ice caps thawed, the ancient Beringians chose to remain behind in the north until they eventually died out."

The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act of 1990 pertains to the "rights of Native American lineal descendants, Indian tribes, and Native Hawaiian organizations with respect to the treatment, repatriation, and disposition of Native American human remains, funerary objects, sacred objects, and objects of cultural patrimony, referred to collectively in the statute as cultural items, with which they can show a relationship of lineal descent or cultural affiliation."

I suppose "we" (including the copenhageners?) can do whatever we want with the remains, including give them to skeletally-named fraternities to spawn new US Uniparty presidents and Big Media executives, or whatever.

 

Edited by Almighty Evan
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Posted (edited)

They came from Siberia. So they're not natives. They're immigrants.

Edited by Black Monk
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2 hours ago, Almighty Evan said:

Important conclusion:

"For whatever reason, while other Native American populations moved south as the ice caps thawed, the ancient Beringians chose to remain behind in the north until they eventually died out."

The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act of 1990 pertains to the "rights of Native American lineal descendants, Indian tribes, and Native Hawaiian organizations with respect to the treatment, repatriation, and disposition of Native American human remains, funerary objects, sacred objects, and objects of cultural patrimony, referred to collectively in the statute as cultural items, with which they can show a relationship of lineal descent or cultural affiliation."

I suppose "we" (including the copenhageners?) can do whatever we want with the remains, including give them to skeletally-named fraternities to spawn new US Uniparty presidents and Big Media executives, or whatever.

 

So without descendant, ancient Beringians corpse have no right and i can make a toothbrush with their bones ? It's just disgusting to have no respect for the dead... a grave site is a grave site and for me, it have to stay undisturbed. We have so many tools now to look at it without disturbing with it...

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On 1/4/2018 at 10:53 AM, NightScreams said:

So something besides my invading ancestors wiped out this native tribe? 

maybe the Short Faced Bear and Smilodon had some effect on them as well

 

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On 1/3/2018 at 11:53 PM, NightScreams said:

So something besides my invading ancestors wiped out this native tribe? 

Native is relative, Native Americans came across the Bering straights I believe. This particular group either died because of disease or more likely by the violent action of another group.....IMO.

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Having said that, the treatment of Native Americans by Europeans and the US was disgusting.

 

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Posted (edited)

On 1/5/2018 at 11:34 AM, seanjo said:

Having said that, the treatment of Native Americans by Europeans and the US was disgusting.

And yet, the disgust works both ways: 

Quote

MASSACRE OF THE MOORES.
Of the many cruel massacres committed by the Indians within
the bounds of the present Tazewell County that of the Moore family
was the most tragic and pathetic. Captain Moore had shown such
wonderful fortitude as a frontiersman, and proved himself such a
gallant soldier in the Indians Wars and in the Revolution, that his
death was a grievous loss to his county and State. Dr. Bickley's
acccount of the tragedy is based upon information he received from
the immediate descendants .of Captain Moore, and from contem
porary written narratives. Therefore it must be an accurate narra
tive of the terrible affair, and I will reproduce it in full, as follows :
'•'In July, 1786, a party of forty-seven Indians, of the Shawnees
tribe, again entered Abb's Valley. Capt. James Moore usually kept
five or six loaded guns in his house, which was a strong log building,
and hoped, by the assistance of his wife, who was very active in
loading a gun, together with Simpson, a man who lived with him,
to be able to repel the attack of any small party of Indians. Rely
ing on his prowess, he had not sought refuge in a fort, as many
of the settlers had; a fact of which the Indians seem to have been
aware, from their cutting out the tongues, of his horses and cattle, 

and partially skinning them. It seems they were afraid to attack
him openly, and sought rather to drive him to the fort, that they
might sack his house.

"On the morning of the attack, Capt. Moore, who had pre
viously distinguished himself at Alamance, was at a lick bog, a short
distance from his house, salting his horses, of which he had many.
William Clark and an Irishman were reaping wheat in front of the
house. Mrs. Moore and the family were engaged in the ordinary
business of housework. A man, named Simpson, was sick up-stairs.
"The two men, who were in the field, at work, saw the Indians
coming, in full speed, down the hill, toward Captain Moore's who
had ere this discovered them, and started in a run for the house.
He was, however, shot through the body, and died immediately.
Two of his children, William and Rebecca, who were returning
from the spring, were killed about the same time. The Indians had
now approached near the house, and were met by two fierce dogs,
which fought manfully to protect the family of their master. After
a severe contest, the fiercest one was killed, and the other subdued.
I shall again use Mr. Brown's narrative, it being quite authentic.
"The two men who were reaping, hearing the alarm, and seeing
the house surrounded, fled, and alarmed the settlement. At that
time, the nearest family was distant six miles. As soon as the alarm
was given, Mrs. Moore and Martha Ivins (who was living in the
family) barred the door, but this was of no avail. There was no
man in the house, at this time except John Simpson, the old English
man, already alluded to, and he was in the loft, sick and in bed.
There were five or six guns in the house, but having been shot off
the evening before, they were then empty. It was intended to have
loaded them after breakfast. Martha Ivins took two of them and
went up stairs where Simpson was, and handing them to him, told
him to shoot. He looked up, but had been shot in the head through
a crack, and was then near his end. The Indians then proceeded
to cut down the door, which they soon effected. During this time,
Martha Ivins went to the far end of the house, lifted up a loose
plank, and went under the floor, and requested Polly Moore (then
eight years of age) who had the youngest child, called Margaret,
in her arms (which was crying), to set the child down, and come
under. Polly looked at the child, clasped it to her breast, and
determined to share its fate. The Indians, having broken into the 

house, took Mrs. Moore and children, viz; John, Jane, Polly, and
Peggy prisoners, and having taken everything that suited them,
they set it and the other buildings on fire, and went away. Martha
Ivins remained under the floor a short time, and then came out and
hid herself under a log that lay across a branch, not far from the
house. The Indians, having tarried a short time, with a view of
catching horses, one of them walked across this log, sat down on the
end of it, and began to fix his gunlock. Miss Ivins, supposing that 

she was discovered, and that he was preparing to shoot her, came
out and gave herself up. At this he seemed much pleased. They
then set out for their towns. Perceiving that John Moore was a
boy, weak in body and mind, and unable to travel, they killed him
the first day. The babe they took two or three days, but it being
fretful, on account of a wound it had received, they dashed its brains
out against a tree. They then moved on with haste to their towns.
For some time, it was usual to tie, very securely, each of the
prisoners at night, and for a warrior to lie beside each of them, with 

tomahawk in hand, so that in case of pursuit, the prisoners might
be speedily dispatched. . * * *
"Shortly after they reached the towns, Mrs. Moore and her
daughter Jane were put to death, being burned and tortured at the
stake. This lasted sometime, during which she manifested the
utmost Christian fortitude, and bore it without a murmur, at
intervals conversing with her daughter Polly, and Martha Ivins,
and expressing great anxiety for the moment to arrive, when her
soul should wing its way to the bosom of its Savior. At length
an old squaw, .more humane than the rest, dispatched her with a
tomahawk.
"Polly Moore and Martha Ivins eventually reached home, as
described in the narrative of James Moore.
"Several incidents, in this narrative, have been left out. When
the Indians set fire to the house and started, they took from the
stable the fine black horse Yorick. He was a horse of such a vicious
nature, that no one could manage him but Simpson. The Indians
had not proceeded far when one mounted him, but soon the horse
had him on the ground, and was pawing him to death with his feet ;
•for this purpose a few strokes were sufficient. Another mounted
him and was served in like manner. Perfectly wild with rage, a
Very large Indian mounted him, swearing to ride him or kill him;
-i few plunges and the Indian was under the feet of the desperate
horse, his teeth buried in his flesh, and uttering a scream as if he
intended to avenge the death of his master; he had just dispatched
the Indian, when another running up, stabbed him, and thus put
an end to the conflict. 'Alas ! poor Yorick.'
"It is said that Mrs. Moore had her body stuck full of lightwood
splinters which were fired, and she was thus tortured three days,
before she died.
"When Martha Evans and Polly Moore were among the French,
they fared much worse than when among the Indians. The French
had plenty, but were miserly, and seemed to care little for their
wants. The Indians had little, but would divide that little to the
last particle.

"A song, in commemoration of the Moore captivity, is sung by
some of the mountaineers to this day, but as it is devoid of poetical
merit I omit its insertion. It may be seen in Howe's History of
Virginia."

Source:  Pendleton's History of Tazewell County and Southwest Virginia 

https://books.google.com/books?id=KiQSAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=Pendleton's+History+of+Tazewell+County&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjpmfepi8rYAhXM5YMKHd9JA6kQ6AEIJzAA#v=onepage&q=Pendleton's History of Tazewell County&f=false

Rarely is history ever so cut and dried that the blame can be laid solely at the feet of one side over the other. 

cormac

Edited by cormac mac airt
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And yet, the disgust works both ways: 

Rarely is history ever so cut and dried that the blame can be laid solely at the feet of one side over the other. 

cormac

Yup! The Swedes and Dutch sent us after criminals and colony runners and we would bring back just their heads. Until we learned from Europeans scalps were easier to carry.

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