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INeedAnswersPLZ

Judgement Day, Is It Real?

105 posts in this topic

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davros of skaro
2 hours ago, DieChecker said:

You assumption though is that following reason is always going to be for the best.

It's reasonable that things would be for the best.

2 hours ago, DieChecker said:

I think the failed Soviet nations show that isn't always so.

I doubt you'd find anyone here that thinks Soviet Communism is reasonable. 

2 hours ago, DieChecker said:

Could be Judgement Day. Only time will tell. Unless you are a Prophet?

No.... I did research.

2 hours ago, DieChecker said:

I'm as childlike as I need to be, while remaining a logical, and faith embracing, adult

Through pretty much the same method for the Magic Kingdom scenario. 

2 hours ago, DieChecker said:

I'll check it out.

Yeah.... Not much of it.

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DieChecker
1 hour ago, davros of skaro said:

It's reasonable that things would be for the best.

I doubt you'd find anyone here that thinks Soviet Communism is reasonable. 

I thought you meant "reason", as in logic, not as in "common sense".

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davros of skaro
17 hours ago, DieChecker said:

I thought you meant "reason", as in logic, not as in "common sense".

 

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eight bits

davros

Well, the video a mixed bag. I think part of the problem is that there is a temptation for each side to adopt the opponents' tactics.

It is a distortion of history to say that the United States was founded as a "Christian nation." It is equally a distortion to say that the United States was founded as a secular nation, and simply fantasy to imagine that "freedom from religion" is a general-purpose Constitutional mandate, at least in the sense that anti-theists frame the phrase (thereby achieving dopamine self-dosing at its finest).

The original small English settlements in North America were commercial ventures (what is now York, Maine is the oldest survivor). But the early big successes (Plymouth and Massachusetts Bay, later consolidated) did have explicit Christian aims, including Christian missionary goals.

All of that activity took place against a background of European competition for North American real estate. The two biggest rivals of Britan, France and Spain, were Roman Catholic states, and aggressive missionary promoters as well.

How that cashed out in actual behavior varied, So you had neighboring Massachusetts and Rhode Island, equally Christian in origin, but diamterically opposed about what it meant to be a Christian state (RI being from its outset the beacon of what became the general American approach to separation of church and state, because of its Christian idealism, not despite it).

By the time the United States (plural) achieved their independence from Britain, and after a brief flirtation with loose confederation that went nowhere, the states differed in how they dealt with the churches. We lionize Thomas Jefferson today for his role in Viriginia's legislative decision not to establish a church, but should also recall that whether or not that was a good idea was hotly contested at the time.

So, all this claptrap about the wisdom of the Founders, and their shrewd application of the lessons of history is manure. The Founders could not agree among themselves what the state religion ought to be as much as whether there ought to be one at all. For example, Massachusetts established any Protestant denomination a town chose to support, thereby papering over the denominational divisions within the state. And "the lessons of history" are a mixed bag. Religion was also widely viewed as a moderating influence upon collective human behavior. For all the anti-theist complaining about the causes of war, there are pro-theist complaints about how unchecked human greed and other vices can turn day-to-day life in nominal peace into a hell on earth.

Finally, the United States (plural) decided to cede some of their sovreignity to a new common federation, the United States of America (singular). Part of the deal was that the new mini-nation-state would not interfere in any of the member states' religious decision making. Those state-level decisions could AND DID include establishing a religion, and interfering with individuals' free expression of religious sentiment. The legal requirement that those things were to be protected by the federal government, nation-wide, as personal rights came after the Civil War, when for a wide variety of practical purposes, the United States was refounded anew.

Final score: The fundies on both sides exaggerate the one-sidedness of the facts for rhetorical advantage. Now that's a lesson of history we'd all do well to learn.

-

Edited by eight bits
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Omnaka
On 1/8/2018 at 4:45 AM, INeedAnswersPLZ said:

God is omnipotent without a doubt so I ask why would he destroy the world he created because of the crime and hate when he can easily manipulate our minds to make us believers and all equal in the name of peace?

Its not love if it's forced.

Everyone believing the same thing, and peace on this world is not as important as many would hope. Reincarnation is true, and after this world comes to a close, you can choose a better place to incarnate, with the experience, learned here.

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