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Stephen61

There was a time when the moon did not exist

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Aquila King
3 hours ago, kmt_sesh said:

Damn evidence, always so inconvenient. Best just to close one's eyes and plug the ears.

I'd say that's most people's unspoken motto.

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ChrLzs
On 1/14/2018 at 0:51 PM, Aquila King said:

I'm amazed that not only did the moon supposedly not exist back then, but that it came into just the right proximity to Earth so that it didn't crash into the Earth, and instead maintain such a perfect orbit around it so as to allow for life as we know it to exist without the forces of gravity creating massive storms and natural disasters.

Oh right... Guess they'll just blame it on 'Aliens' or somethin. <_<

Ever think that given there are bazillions of earth-like planets, by the laws of probability there had to be one that inherited a moon, and just about at the right distance?  (Rather like them monkeys typing shakespeare?)  To be reminded about just how many stars (and thus solar systems, thus planets and moons..), go outside on a clear night, away from city lights.  Look up..  Start counting, but remember that EVERY star you are seeing is right next to us - within a small region of our arm of that galaxy... (the only objects outside our tiny little galaxy that you can see with the naked eye are Andromeda and the Magellanic clouds, in other words our 3 nearest neighbors, and they are pretty faint..)...

And doesn't that fit rather well with the fact that we don't see other life out there (yet)?  That's becoz it is un-frickin-believably rare.........  Lucky old us to have a moon...

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Jarocal
18 hours ago, kmt_sesh said:

Damn evidence, always so inconvenient. Best just to close one's eyes and plug the ears.

Why not, it has worked for Egyptologists...

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stereologist

Another interesting fact is that fossil corals show that the year once had around 420 days in it. Tides would have been about 9 times what they are now in size. The Moon  has been moving away from the Earth and the rotation of the Earth has slowed.

https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2016/02/fossilized-coral-calendar-changes-leap-day/471180/

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/1996-07/UoA-TRTM-050796.php

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Early modern-day astronomers realized from 2,000-year-old records that the timing of lunar eclipses was changing, so Earth-and-moon dynamics were altering

There I tied this into ancient history.

 

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stereologist

I forgot to look for the tide heights links. Here is a place I've visited, Miguasha. If you ever are close by stop in. Only place in the world where the 4 classes of fish can be found: acanthodians , placoderms, cChondrichthyans, actinopterygians

http://miguasha.ca/mig-en/a_devonian_day.php

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but when added up over hundreds of millions of years, we can calculate that the Moon is now twice as far from Earth as it was during Devonian time. As a consequence, Devonian tides were up to seven times larger than today’s tides.

 

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Socks Junior

The methodology behind coral "line counting" is pretty interesting. I pity the lab peons who did all the grunt work.

From: Zhang et al., 2010. Experimental measurement of growth patterns on fossil corals: Secular variation in ancient Earth-Sun distances

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There are three hierarchies of growth patterns on fossil corals...Each corresponds to an astronomical period. (1) Daily patterns. Fine ‘ridges’ on the surface of the coral epitheca are parallel to the growing edge of the corallum. The vertical thickness of the ridges also varies. It has been long accepted that these fine ridges, or growth lines, are an expression of the daily fluctuation of the periodicity of constrictions [1]. Among diurnal animals, activity increases in daylight. Kawaguti and Sakumoto [30] initially inferred that calcification occurs in the light but not in the dark by measuring variations in the levels of Ca2+ in seawater in which they incubated corals. Goreau [12] proved that the rate of calcium deposition is directly proportional to the light intensity. Moya et al. [15] confirmed this point with experiments on modern coral tissues. (2) Lunar patterns. The coral epitheca also shows constrictions along its length, demarcating successive groups of ridges for which the term ‘bands’ is proposed. Ditch-like constrictions divide the epitheca into several bands, each containing 27–34 diurnal ridges, indicating that the bands are lunar. Usually the constrictions are simply deep grooves around the circumference of the epitheca, but occasionally they are emphasized by a change in the thickness of the corallite, most often being of smaller diameter above than below the groove. Such bands have been interpreted as being controlled by lunar-month breeding periodicity [6]. Here the motivating factor appears to be moonlight [14], with breeding usually falling between the full moon and last quarter. (3) Annual patterns. On many fossil corals, several major ‘annulations’ in the form of swells can be distinguished, as presented in Figure 1(a) and (b) (enlargement). There are 12–14 lunar bands between neighboring annulations on all specimens. A typical lunar band on fossil coral contains 27–34 daily ridges. Annual periodicity in coral growth has long been accepted [1,6,9–12]. This is related to seasonal variation in the water temperature [11]. Knutson et al. [10] took autoradiographs and X-radiographs through the centers of reef corals from Eniwetok and found that the cyclic variations in radial density revealed by X-radiography are annual. Therefore, by taking the statistics of quantitative relationships, both the ancient number of lunar months per year and the ancient number of days per year can be obtained. Following basic principles developed by Wells [1], modern technologies of pattern recovery including the fast Fourier transform and ImagePro Phase matching are used here to overcome the abrasion of the fossils. Maximum counting on each individual [4] and consecutive counting [8] are employed to yield a higher, more accurate value. Fossils with more than two consecutive annulations are chosen and analyzed.

An MUCH MORE readable summary comes from SK Runcorn, who was a jack of all trades geophysicist. I recommend this one. The art of readable scientific writing is slowly getting lost, I think.

http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdf/24931079.pdf?refreqid=excelsior%3A05111457ec3feff36ec51ac54e630e17

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