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rashore

What ya got cooking UM?

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rashore

We have a popular thread here on UM, What's for dinner?. A lot of us post regularly in it, and I've often found myself wanting to derail that thread to ask folks for how they are making stuff, or other food tangents.. and a lot of us have posted randomly in other areas about cooking.

I figured it was nigh time we got to talking about what we got cooking goin on. A thread to share recipes, or hit the UM community up for help with cooking. Tips and tricks you do in the kitchen to share, look for inspiration when you are dead beat tired of zucchini or pasta a gajillion ways and looking for something new. A thread to share how you keep your larder well stocked.. and with what.

So what ya got cooking UM? Or want to get cooking, here's the thread for it :tu:

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Grandpa Greenman

Leftover homemade pork carnitas.  

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rashore
3 minutes ago, Grandpa Greenman said:

Leftover homemade pork carnitas.  

Mmmm, did you make the pork? I'm always up for trying a new meat stewing recipe.

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Grandpa Greenman

My roommate cooked it.  We bought a carnitas seasoned pork roast from Publix. Which he dropped in a roaster and put it in the oven at 350 for a few hours, then took it out and shredded it with a fork.  Then we made taco sides.  Yummy stuff.  

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tcgram

That sounds good.  We usually simmer out pork shoulder in broth and spices for 2-3 hours, then take it out and crisp it up in the oven, shredding it.  We make an asian slaw to go with it, and have limes, cilantro and red onion.  Here's the recipe:   

  • 1/4 cup vegetable oil
  • 4 pounds pork shoulder, cut into several large pieces
  • 3 tablespoons kosher salt
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, crushed

 

  • 3 tablespoons lime juice
  • 1 tablespoon chili powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 4 (14.5 ounce) cans chicken broth

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C).
  2. Heat the vegetable oil in a large Dutch oven over high heat. Season the pork shoulder with salt, then arrange the pork in the Dutch oven. Cook until browned on all sides, about 10 minutes. Add the onion, garlic, lime juice, chili powder, oregano, and cumin. Pour in the chicken broth, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover, and continue to simmer until pork is very tender, about 2 1/2 hours.
  3. Transfer the pork shoulder to a large baking sheet, reserving the cooking liquid. Drizzle with a small amount of the reserved cooking liquid and lightly season with salt.
  4. Bake the pork in the preheated oven until browned, about 30 minutes. Drizzle more of the cooking liquid on the meat every 10 minutes, and use two forks to shred the meat as it browns.

 

 

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Piney

Native style tomato sauce ( yes we invented it) with red peppers, carrots, porkchops, deer sausage and chicken over sticky rice covered in crumbled feta cheese.

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Daughter of the Nine Moons

Pinned.

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SecretSanta

Following because I need more ideas because I’m sick of everything I fix. 

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Piney
17 minutes ago, SecretSanta said:

Following because I need more ideas because I’m sick of everything I fix. 

Your from the South. Do you like spicy? Because I use cumin and wild garlic in EVERYTHING and I know garlic grows wild a lot in the South. 

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tcgram
16 hours ago, tcgram said:

That sounds good.  We usually simmer out pork shoulder in broth and spices for 2-3 hours, then take it out and crisp it up in the oven, shredding it.  We make an asian slaw to go with it, and have limes, cilantro and red onion.  Here's the recipe:   

  • 1/4 cup vegetable oil
  • 4 pounds pork shoulder, cut into several large pieces
  • 3 tablespoons kosher salt
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, crushed

 

  • 3 tablespoons lime juice
  • 1 tablespoon chili powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 4 (14.5 ounce) cans chicken broth

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C).
  2. Heat the vegetable oil in a large Dutch oven over high heat. Season the pork shoulder with salt, then arrange the pork in the Dutch oven. Cook until browned on all sides, about 10 minutes. Add the onion, garlic, lime juice, chili powder, oregano, and cumin. Pour in the chicken broth, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover, and continue to simmer until pork is very tender, about 2 1/2 hours.
  3. Transfer the pork shoulder to a large baking sheet, reserving the cooking liquid. Drizzle with a small amount of the reserved cooking liquid and lightly season with salt.
  4. Bake the pork in the preheated oven until browned, about 30 minutes. Drizzle more of the cooking liquid on the meat every 10 minutes, and use two forks to shred the meat as it browns.

 

 

Forgot to add: we also use the zest from 1-2 limes in the cooking liquid.  Gives it a better flavor, IMO.  

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SecretSanta
13 hours ago, Piney said:

Your from the South. Do you like spicy? Because I use cumin and wild garlic in EVERYTHING and I know garlic grows wild a lot in the South. 

I like flavorful foods that can have some heat but I definitely don’t like things so hot/spicy that my eyes tear and my nose runs. 

I’ve never used wild garlic though. 

My problem is this...no one likes the same stuff in this house. My son eats...well, not much. My husband likes meat and potatoes (how many different ways can you cook ground beef, a roast or steak?),  my daughter likes something,eats it until she’s tired of it and never wants it again. 

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tcgram
2 hours ago, SecretSanta said:

I like flavorful foods that can have some heat but I definitely don’t like things so hot/spicy that my eyes tear and my nose runs. 

I’ve never used wild garlic though. 

My problem is this...no one likes the same stuff in this house. My son eats...well, not much. My husband likes meat and potatoes (how many different ways can you cook ground beef, a roast or steak?),  my daughter likes something,eats it until she’s tired of it and never wants it again. 

My hubby has gotten better about trying new things over the years, my daughter will eat about anything but my son is a different story altogether.  He doesn't like most veggies, and loves meat and pasta.  So I keep trying to find things that everyone will eat, sometimes tweaking recipes until I find something I like.  Will your hubby eat any other meat besides beef or maybe will give beans a try?

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rashore
On 1/19/2018 at 5:57 PM, Piney said:

Native style tomato sauce ( yes we invented it) with red peppers, carrots, porkchops, deer sausage and chicken over sticky rice covered in crumbled feta cheese.

So how do you make Native style tomato sauce with all that good stuff in it? Don't just say that without sharing how it's made man.. that's just mean. 

 

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Piney
46 minutes ago, rashore said:

So how do you make Native style tomato sauce with all that good stuff in it? Don't just say that without sharing how it's made man.. that's just mean. 

 

Frozen home grown tomatoes ( they pop out their skin that way after they are defrosted)

Touch of sage 

Basil lots of basil

Touch of cumin

Chop carrot or arrowroot 

Chopped wild scallions or onions

Chopped and peeled roasted sweet red peppers.

chopped wild garlic and I throw a couple of cloves of elephant garlic in there because I like to eat them separate.

Chopped meat and chicken or chopped seafood. whatever's laying around. Lots of it.

Touch of cumin again so the health benefits aren't cooked out of it.

Cook for no less than 1/1/2 hours. Touch of tumeric after cooked

I make sure the skin and seeds are out of, and off the tomatoes and peppers because I have the same problems as @XenoFish but mine is from scar tissue and fibrosis from too many injuries in the midsection. Not diverticulitis. Sometimes I'll throw in some hot peppers or smoked paprika depending upon my mood

 

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tcgram

We made 15 bean soup in the crock pot with pork loin, onion, a huge smoked ham hock, salt and pepper.  

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Piney
2 hours ago, tcgram said:

We made 15 bean soup in the crock pot with pork loin, onion, a huge smoked ham hock, salt and pepper.  

I love making multiple bean soup with bacon and pork chops in it. I also throw paprika in it and of course.....cumin. Put the crock pot on at 8am. 6pm it is READY!

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tcgram
Just now, Piney said:

I love making multiple bean soup with bacon and pork chops in it. I also throw paprika in it and of course.....cumin. Put the crock pot on at 8am. 6pm it is READY!

Yep, I buy the dried beans, soak them overnight, then drain most of the liquid off, throw them in the crock pot with some onion, salt, pepper, and usually some kind of meat in there.  

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Piney
2 minutes ago, tcgram said:

Yep, I buy the dried beans, soak them overnight, then drain most of the liquid off, throw them in the crock pot with some onion, salt, pepper, and usually some kind of meat in there.  

Too much work. I'll buy a bunch of different cans of beans and throw them in. Natives like their beans cooked to paste. We invented refried beans. 

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tcgram
Just now, Piney said:

Too much work. I'll buy a bunch of different cans of beans and throw them in. Natives like their beans cooked to paste. We invented refried beans. 

Canned beans seem a bit too salty for my taste.  And I have a recipe for refried beans that I want to try using leftover cooked pinto beans.  

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Piney
16 minutes ago, tcgram said:

Canned beans seem a bit too salty for my taste.  And I have a recipe for refried beans that I want to try using leftover cooked pinto beans.  

I need the salt because I don't add it to anything I cook and work outdoors sweating or freezing.

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tcgram
Just now, Piney said:

I need the salt because I don't add it to anything I cook and work outdoors sweating or freezing.

I have borderline high blood pressure so I don't use a lot of salt in my cooking.  

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Piney
1 minute ago, tcgram said:

I have borderline high blood pressure so I don't use a lot of salt in my cooking.  

I have such a "screw it" attitude I doubt I'll ever have high blood pressure.

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Overdueleaf

Tomorrow is homemade 5 cheese Macaroni and cheese with little smokies added for the kids big and small

I start out by cooking 2 pounds of elbow macaroni in salted water

Make a rue from real butter and flour

On medium heat

Amounts are estimates as I eye based off of the depth of my dutch oven

Stir in chicken stock ..3 cups till rue dissolves

Add in some half in half ..3 cups

stir occassionally

Add hand shredded colby, mild cheddar, smoked gouda and montery jack add to sauce

Stir until melted, add salt and pepper to taste dash of cayenne pepper

Place noodles into butter baking dish with little smokies, spoon cheese mixture onto noodles and mix thoroughly until desired coverage

Top with slices of havarti

Bake 350 for about 35 minutes

 

Left over cheese sauce makes for great nacho dipping or on veggie for kids who are reluctant to eat them

 

 

 

 

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Overdueleaf

Tonight we finally had country fried steaks

just about anyone can do mashed potatoes, corn and saurkraut

for my country fried steaks i use a pork cube steak

i make a quick butter milk by mixing 2% milk and vinegar i don't really know amounts as i just eye them based on the dish i use

i make a flour mixture and season it generously with garlic powder, onion powder, seasoning salt, paprika, cumin,and black pepper

Simply dip the steak into the buttermilk then dredge in the flour. I pat the flour into the steak so it gets into every nook and cranny

Then deep fry at 350 for 5 and a half minutes

 

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Piney
5 minutes ago, Overdueleaf said:

Left over cheese sauce makes for great nacho dipping or on veggie for kids who are reluctant to eat them

or poured over sticky rice or cooked cauliflower. :tu:

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