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Still Waters

Nefertiti was no pharaoh

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Still Waters

Contrary to popular opinion, one of the most famous women in ancient history did not rule Egypt, according to a new book.

Dr. Joyce Tyldesley, an Egyptologist from The University of Manchester, says Queen Nefertiti was just one of a series of powerful queens who played an influential role in Egyptian history.

It was, argues Dr. Tyldesley, the beauty of her famous limestone and plaster sculpture—reportedly Hitler's favourite piece of ancient art—which propelled her into the public spotlight after it was put on public display in 1923.

https://phys.org/news/2018-01-nefertiti-pharaoh-renowned-egyptologist.html

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khol

Here is her sculpture

 

4cb937d0904b1a32d939f8ce02d373f8--nefertiti-bust-queen-nefertiti.jpg

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The Wistman

This theory may be contrary to popular opinion, but it is also disputed among Egyptological academics.  Dr. Aidan Dodson, of the University of Bristol, who once agreed with the cited author's thesis of Nefertiti's non-kingship, has changed his mind and now sees her ruling (after the premature death of Crown Prince Smenkhkare) as co-regent and then as king/Pharaoh Neferneferuaten:

http://www.academia.edu/8206029/Amarna_Sunset_the_late-Amarna_succession_revisited

Dodson's theory gives plausibility to the notion of Nefertiti being buried in state behind the wall of Tutankhamun's burial chamber, because it had originally been her own royal tomb as Pharaoh.  Finding her there would most likely provide answers to the Amarna succession and (maybe) cool the debate among scholars.

Dr. Tyldesley's argument seems predicated on the discovery and glamour of Nefertiti's famous sculptural image capturing the imagination of the public and of academics, exploding in their minds Nefertiti's actual importance.  It also argues that she being of non-royal birth, she simply could not have succeeded to the throne.  The first point seems overly pompous to me, the second could be and has been thoroughly argued.

There is still a pressing need to see beyond the wall of Tut's tomb.

Edited by The Wistman
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Jon the frog

Well in our world of instant success and instant forgotten, she was quite a women to be headline thousands of years after her death.

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DebDandelion

Interesting read! Thanks @Still Watersand @The Wistman

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The Wistman
21 hours ago, Jon the frog said:

Well in our world of instant success and instant forgotten, she was quite a women to be headline thousands of years after her death.

On that issue I'd say Dr. Tyldesley's point is valid: the superb finesse of the sculpture by the Amarna court sculptor-in-chief Thutmose, which so captured the stunning image and queenly pride of this extraordinary woman, has truly raised her star in our modern eyes.  She's visually unforgettable. And, naturally, we want to know her story.  Since the story is fragmentary (particularly the finish) and there's been no recovery of her tomb or her remains, we are left with much conjecture built on bits of evidence.  However, I don't think it's helpful to dismiss the scholars who patiently study the available evidence as more-or-less starry eyed fanbots.

Edited by The Wistman
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Jarocal
On 1/22/2018 at 6:10 PM, The Wistman said:

 

There is still a pressing need to see beyond the wall of Tut's tomb.

Shame Vyse isn't still around. He really knew how to get through walls. Of course after he gained entry there would probably be quarry marks from one of Khufu's stone gangs in there.:D

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The Wistman
On 1/24/2018 at 4:40 PM, Jarocal said:

Shame Vyse isn't still around. He really knew how to get through walls. Of course after he gained entry there would probably be quarry marks from one of Khufu's stone gangs in there.:D

Yes....oh for the good old days!  Even Mariette used dynamite to blow apart the caved-in roof that blocked his access to the main axis of the Lesser Vaults of the Serapeum.  This area, to this day, has never been completely cleared or explored, due to the dangerous condition of the halls and galleries.  Even Mohammed Ibraham Aly, doing his major re-clearance of the Serapeum in the 1980's, had to abandon his efforts inside the Lesser Vaults, due to the volatile instability.  No one has since taken up the task. There's even an unexplored room(s?) beneath the floor of the original vestibule that has neither been explored nor cleared at all, being just too scary to risk.  Considering the care that the Prince Khaemwaset took toward all his endeavors, it seems improbable that this original section of the Serapeum, for which he was responsible, was poorly built or imperfectly conceived, or that the site was wrongly considered and chosen.  It is therefore plausible that the Lesser Vaults' ruinous and dangerous condition is due to shock waves from the explosion of Mariette's dynamite.  Some people attribute the collapsed ceiling to an earlier intrusion, not to the natural fracturing and instability.  However, it must be noted that the Grand Galleries themselves had serious ceiling fracturing which has had to be rigorously braced with limestone and, in many places, steel girder trussing...rather spoiling the original effect.  Whether the shock waves from Mariette's dynamite contributed to the Grand Galleries' unstable condition is also a matter of conjecture, but surely a possibility.

5a6a708edd1b6_lesservaults.jpg.6e6fba59b5f75166b7a1118d5514ed2b.jpg

The Lesser Vaults 

Red:  Original entrance and stairway built by Khaemwaset (later changed and section [2] buried, closing off original entrance until 1980's rediscovery)                                    

a, b:   Extensions of entrance built by Psamtek

c:       New entrance into Lesser Vaults from newly built Grand Galleries by Psamtek

3:        Original vestibule

4:        Main axis of Lesser Vaults galleries

5:        (shaded gray) Room below vestibule, accessed thru north wall of vestibule (too dangerous to explore)

6:        Collapsed ceiling blocking north galleries and chambers

Sorry for the digression, but I think it's a point worth making,  We don't want to ruin or destabilize anything in our quest for knowledge...and treasure.

Edited by The Wistman
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The Wistman
17 hours ago, The Wistman said:

  Whether the shock waves from Mariette's dynamite contributed to the Grand Galleries' unstable condition is also a matter of conjecture, but surely a possibility.

Oops...my lack of expertise is showing.  Should have said the Greater Vaults, not Grand Gallery.   Sorry dad.  :wacko:

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