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Vista From Mars Rover


Waspie_Dwarf
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Posted (IP: Staff) ·

Vista From Mars Rover Looks Back Over Journey So Far

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pia22210-nasac.jpg?itok=kwq2LsnA

A panoramic image that NASA's Curiosity Mars rover took from a mountainside ridge provides a sweeping vista of key sites visited since the rover's 2012 landing, and the towering surroundings.

The view from "Vera Rubin Ridge" on the north flank of Mount Sharp encompasses much of the 11-mile (18-kilometer) route the rover has driven from its 2012 landing site, all inside Gale Crater. One hill on the northern horizon is about 50 miles (about 85 kilometers) away, well outside of the crater, though most of the scene's horizon is the crater's northern rim, roughly one-third that distance away and 1.2 miles (2 kilometers) above the rover.

arrow3.gif  Read More: NASA

 

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Very cool!  Thanks Waspie!

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Wow! I've never seen anything quite like this before.

Edited by pallidin
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20 minutes ago, goodgodno said:

How would these images look to the human eye? 

They look very much like a barren Earth. 

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16 hours ago, freetoroam said:

They look very much like a barren Earth. 

If goodgodno is like me, he's wondering what it would look like without the colors having been changed. You know, red surface, pink sky etc.

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Posted (IP: Staff) ·
On 2/2/2018 at 9:56 PM, goodgodno said:

How would these images look to the human eye? 

Despite freetoroam's rather dismissive answer (rather suggesting she didn't understand it) this is a very good question.

 

7 hours ago, DirtyDocMartens said:

If goodgodno is like me, he's wondering what it would look like without the colors having been changed. You know, red surface, pink sky etc.

How they would look to the human eye is a little subjective, given that the brain tends to compensate for different lighting conditions. For example a piece of white paper looks white even if you are in a room illuminated by fluorescent lighting, which has a distinctly yellow output. If you photograph the same piece of paper (without using the white balance that exists on many modern digital cameras) the paper will appear yellow in the photograph.

Photograph the same piece of paper under sodium light and it will appear orange, but once again if you look at it with the naked eye then you will know it is white.

Things are made even more complicated by the fact that human perception varies from individual to individual. If you have ever bought a new TV it is highly likely that you have altered the colour, brightness and contrast settings to give an image that looks right to you. Someone else, with the same TV, would quite likely not adjust the settings in exactly the same way you have,

The image in the original post has had it's colours balanced so that the rocks look how they would under Earth illumination. Given that this is effectively what the human brain is doing then it quite likely that this image is a better representation of how a human on Mars would perceive the view. However the images which have not been colour balanced are more representative of the actual colours visible.

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