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Essan

Did the Ancient Greeks Visit Canada?

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Piney
Just now, Captain Risky said:

no doubt. so if what you suggest is right then all the maps should be pretty much the same. i think i read that only a 1/3rd of the actual Piri Reis map has been found. imagine what could possibly be on the rest. 

Could be interesting if found. :tu:

 

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Captain Risky

such a fascinating topic. Im still reading up on it, Piney. 

This controversy was precipitated when Professor Charles Hapgood published, in 1965, his theory about Antarctica in the book Maps of the Ancient Sea Kings. Professor Hapgood, based at the University of New Hampshire, had studied the Piri Reis Map with his students and found several things that they could not explain. Not only was there the issue of Antarctica without its ice cap, but they noticed that the map was drawn using the Mercator Projection, a methodology not used by European cartographers until the late 16th century.

Flemish cartographer Gerardus Mercator devised the cylindrical map projection in 1569. The Greeks had the ability to create cylindrical maps utilizing their knowledge of the Earth as a sphere, along with the astrological and geometric skills to calculate latitude and longitude. The accuracy of the Mercator Projection was not absolute until the chronometer was invented in 1760.

http://www.thevintagenews.com/2018/01/02/piri-reis-map-of-1513/

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Piney
Quote
Not really. My guess is that it came from Greek or Fenician maps. There is a greek tombstone recently discovered in Uruguay as also fenician inscriptions in Brazil. In terms of distance it seems that it is more logical to consider Europe as an initial point than China that is in the other side of the world.

I just had to quote this comment from the article. :lol:

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Captain Risky

yeah it is pretty funny. fenician? still i wonder if the rest of the article can be so easily dismissed, thou. i googled mercator maps and this is what i found.

Image result for Mercator Projection piri reis

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Sir Wearer of Hats

Felician, phrom Fenice. You know, the sity of channels.

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Noteverythingisaconspiracy
9 hours ago, Captain Risky said:

yeah it is pretty funny. fenician? still i wonder if the rest of the article can be so easily dismissed, thou. i googled mercator maps and this is what i found.

Image result for Mercator Projection piri reis

The main mystery is why people think this map is amazingly accurate. If the bottom part is supposed to be the southern parts of South America they are out by 90 degrees. If it is supposed to show Antartica, it ignores the almost 1000 km wide Drake passage. Quite an oversight on a map that is supposed to be amazingly accurate, isn't it ?

Likewise North America is wildly inaccurate. 

The fact that only the northern parts of South America and the Carribean are fairly accurate supports the idea that this was a map based on geography as it was known at the time. Those were the only parts of the Americas that had been explored by then. At the time it was common practice to basically make up the parts of a map that wasn't known. The southern part of the map is probably meant to illustrate Terra Australis, a landmass that was thought to exist until the 18th century. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terra_Australis

This map by Mercator is a good example of this:

Mercator_1569.png

I think we can agree that large parts of this map is made up ?

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jmccr8
14 hours ago, Piney said:

Here's something else that's interesting from the article you posted @Captain Risky

 

Hi Piney

And they were all after America was discovered. Hmm:D

jmccr8

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jmccr8
14 hours ago, Captain Risky said:

no doubt. so if what you suggest is right then all the maps should be pretty much the same. i think i read that only a 1/3rd of the actual Piri Reis map has been found. imagine what could possibly be on the rest. 

Hi Risky

I would think that we could safely assume that if there was more to the map that it would be shown to have ink on it.

jmccr8

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Piney
31 minutes ago, jmccr8 said:

Hi Risky

I would think that we could safely assume that if there was more to the map that it would be shown to have ink on it.

jmccr8

Nobody likes a smartass....:lol:

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Captain Risky
8 hours ago, jmccr8 said:

Hi Risky

I would think that we could safely assume that if there was more to the map that it would be shown to have ink on it.

jmccr8

i sorta see how something like missing parts of a map could frustrate someone like you. ;)

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jmccr8
19 minutes ago, Captain Risky said:

i sorta see how something like missing parts of a map could frustrate someone like you. ;)

Hi Risky

Missing bits of a map are of little interest to me and the new maps have everything in the right place anyway. Besides my girl from Google always tells me where to go and how to get there.:lol:Politely as well.:lol:

jmccr8

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Captain Risky

Piri Reis produced many maps, but the most shocking one of all is probably his map compiled in 1521 when he was 50 years old. (Kitab-i Bahriye) It was acclaimed during his lifetime and a large number of copies were made. This map showed the entire world, using a projection that is immediately recognizable to the western reader. It is amazing to realize that this map was compiled only 29 years after Columbus first discovered the islands of central America. Here a Turkish Admiral had a map of the entire world, including North and South America, Antarctica, California, and more. The only major flaw in the map is a misunderstanding of Australia and Antarctica. (See below)

 

PeriReisWorldMap1.jpg

 

http://nabataea.net/ottomanmaps.html

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Piney
4 minutes ago, Captain Risky said:

Piri Reis produced many maps, but the most shocking one of all is probably his map compiled in 1521 when he was 50 years old. (Kitab-i Bahriye) It was acclaimed during his lifetime and a large number of copies were made. This map showed the entire world, using a projection that is immediately recognizable to the western reader. It is amazing to realize that this map was compiled only 29 years after Columbus first discovered the islands of central America. Here a Turkish Admiral had a map of the entire world, including North and South America, Antarctica, California, and more. The only major flaw in the map is a misunderstanding of Australia and Antarctica. (See below)

 

PeriReisWorldMap1.jpg

 

http://nabataea.net/ottomanmaps.html

North America is slightly off. No Florida or Alaska and Baja is WAY too big. :lol:

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Captain Risky
1 minute ago, Piney said:

North America is slightly off. No Florida or Alaska and Baja is WAY too big. :lol:

damn! what was Piri Reis thinking. correction, what were those ancient Greeks thinking. :o

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Piney
Just now, Captain Risky said:

damn! what was Piri Reis thinking. correction, what were those ancient Greeks thinking. :o

They had dune buggies and quads and thought Baja was the ****.

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Captain Risky

it is interesting to note that Australia and Antartica are drawn as one. not a bad map either way.

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Piney
40 minutes ago, Captain Risky said:

it is interesting to note that Australia and Antartica are drawn as one. not a bad map either way.

Well, they were millions of years ago, and connected to South America too. Maybe the original was drawn by a primitive possum.

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Sir Wearer of Hats
4 minutes ago, Piney said:

Well, they were millions of years ago, and connected to South America too. Maybe the original was drawn by a primitive possum.

A possum? Who are you attempting to kid. It was a shrew, working for the Felis Regis as they attempted to oust the Bassets.

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Piney
1 minute ago, Sir Wearer of Hats said:

A possum? Who are you attempting to kid. It was a shrew, working for the Felis Regis as they attempted to oust the Bassets.

I still think it was a possum. But we will never know because @Harte ate all their oral historians.

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Sir Wearer of Hats
12 minutes ago, Piney said:

I still think it was a possum. But we will never know because @Harte ate all their oral historians.

Good thing they weren’t annals of history then.

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Captain Risky
38 minutes ago, Piney said:

Well, they were millions of years ago, and connected to South America too. Maybe the original was drawn by a primitive possum.

Possum. are those ancient Greeks playing dead too? :rolleyes:

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stereologist
On 3/24/2018 at 9:18 PM, Captain Risky said:

such a fascinating topic. Im still reading up on it, Piney. 

This controversy was precipitated when Professor Charles Hapgood published, in 1965, his theory about Antarctica in the book Maps of the Ancient Sea Kings. Professor Hapgood, based at the University of New Hampshire, had studied the Piri Reis Map with his students and found several things that they could not explain. Not only was there the issue of Antarctica without its ice cap, but they noticed that the map was drawn using the Mercator Projection, a methodology not used by European cartographers until the late 16th century.

Flemish cartographer Gerardus Mercator devised the cylindrical map projection in 1569. The Greeks had the ability to create cylindrical maps utilizing their knowledge of the Earth as a sphere, along with the astrological and geometric skills to calculate latitude and longitude. The accuracy of the Mercator Projection was not absolute until the chronometer was invented in 1760.

http://www.thevintagenews.com/2018/01/02/piri-reis-map-of-1513/

Hapgood admitted he was wrong about his idea of crustal displacements.

The map does not show Antarctica despite claims.

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