Jump to content
Unexplained Mysteries uses cookies. By using the site you consent to our use of cookies as per our Cookie Policy.
Close X
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Still Waters

Woodpeckers show signs of brain damage

8 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

Still Waters

With woodpeckers, the answer's in the question—true to their name, they peck wood. And when they do, they peck hard—with each peck, the bird undergoes a force of 1,200 to 1,400 g's. By comparison, a measly force of 60-100 g's can give a human a concussion. The fact that a woodpecker can undergo fourteen times that without getting hurt has led helmet makers model their designs around these birds' skulls. However, a new study in PLOS ONE complicates this story by showing that woodpecker brains contain build-ups of a protein associated with brain damage in humans.

https://phys.org/news/2018-02-woodpeckers-brain-bad.html

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
Hankenhunter

Thousands of hits? You might want to bump that up a bit. If the romantic b***** that beats on the top of the power pole by my bedroom to entice females is any indication, he would rattle off a thousand hits in one morning. By the end of mating season he must have one hammer of a headache. :blink:

Hank

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sundew

That explains a lot.....woody-woodpecker-1940-01-g.jpg

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hankenhunter
2 hours ago, Hankenhunter said:

Thousands of hits? You might want to bump that up a bit. If the romantic bird  that beats on the tin covered top of the power pole by my bedroom to entice females is any indication, he would rattle off a thousand hits in one morning. By the end of mating season he must have one hammer of a headache. :blink:

Hank

 

Edited by Hankenhunter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Silent Trinity

I can see some merit perhaps in the research but surely, evolution has made the Woodpecker what it is and they have developed like most other creatures according to their needs, and according to the requirements of their life, therefore I would have thought that they would not have such a violent concussive impact as perhaps a human would who has not developed a need to hammer wood with their heads at high speed. Perhaps any calcified deposits on their brains would therefore actually come from the human impact on their lives, making metal and concrete poles etc that they won't know are not trees until they have given themselves headache trying to hammer through a lamppost etc lol.

I would have thought that if Woodpeckers were damaging their brains we would know about it by now as they staggered around town shouting at traffic and declaring Justin Bieber their one true god lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DirtyDocMartens

As long as they live long enough to reproduce, it doesn't matter what happens to their brains later in their lives. That's how evolution works.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
TripGun

What is the baseline to measure a birds stupidity? The glass box test? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
paperdyer

Hey - let's capture some Woodpecker families that are nesting.  Let the eggs hatch and have the NFL equipment manufacturers fit half of the baby woodpeckers with helmets when they come of age to want wood and run a study to see if the helmets work.  We could save the woodpeckers from extinction and stupidity from brain damage.  If there isn't any brain damage noted either way, then the construction of the woodpecker skull needs to be looked at to help the NFL equipment manufacturers to make better helmets.  Of course all the animal rights people would prevent this study from getting off the ground.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.