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First Britons had dark skin: The Cheddar Man

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hetrodoxly
3 hours ago, jmccr8 said:

Ahh they have fur covering their bodies so the comparison is useless.

jmccr8 

So you're saying as soon as the fur came off they turned black?

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jmccr8
15 minutes ago, hetrodoxly said:

So you're saying as soon as the fur came off they turned black?

Mutation to environment because the skin would be expose to the sun amd would need to be protected from burning. In the Northern colder climates the conditions are different so the body adapted.

jmccr8

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hetrodoxly
1 minute ago, jmccr8 said:

Mutation to environment because the skin would be expose to the sun amd would need to be protected from burning. In the Northern colder climates the conditions are different so the body adapted.

jmccr8

So they were white and turned black.

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jmccr8
2 minutes ago, hetrodoxly said:

So they were white and turned black.

Or vice versa adaptation to environment

jmccr8

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Piney
On 2/8/2018 at 9:52 AM, oldrover said:

That was Bryan Sykes though. He's no noted for his accuracy.

You mean the whole Ivar the Boneless affair? My mothers family was part of that study and I never told him I was tri-racial. :lol:

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Carnoferox
42 minutes ago, Piney said:

You mean the whole Ivar the Boneless affair? My mothers family was part of that study and I never told him I was tri-racial. :lol:

I think he was referring to Sykes' infamous yeti genetic study. 

Edited by Carnoferox
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Piney
10 minutes ago, Carnoferox said:

I think he was referring to Sykes' infamous yeti genetic study. 

I missed that one. I'll look it up. :tu:

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oldrover
1 hour ago, Carnoferox said:

I think he was referring to Sykes' infamous yeti genetic study. 

Not just that one, there are a few. 

Speaking of genetics; I spoke to one of the researchers in the recent tiger genome study,  you were quite right, the results there support that the numbat is indeed their closest relative, I stand corrected. Again. 

1 hour ago, Piney said:

You mean the whole Ivar the Boneless affair? My mothers family was part of that study and I never told him I was tri-racial. :lol:

Not sure which one that is, sounds very interesting though, can you expand? There's been quite a few apparently. 

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Piney
1 minute ago, oldrover said:

Not just that one, there are a few. 

Speaking of genetics; I spoke to one of the researchers in the recent tiger genome study,  you were quite right, the results there support that the numbat is indeed their closest relative, I stand corrected. Again. 

Not sure which one that is, sounds very interesting though, can you expand? There's been quite a few apparently. 

He was looking for the genetic marker for the brittle bone disease and assumed they were Ivar's descendants. He took samples all over Yorkshire. 

"He didn't know Septimus Severus's Numidian Laeti and the Sarmatian/Hun Laeti left such a strong genetic mark." :lol:

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Carnoferox
20 minutes ago, oldrover said:

Speaking of genetics; I spoke to one of the researchers in the recent tiger genome study,  you were quite right, the results there support that the numbat is indeed their closest relative, I stand corrected. Again.  

I still find it humorous that the closest relative of the thylacine is a small insectivore.

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hetrodoxly
10 hours ago, oldrover said:

Not just that one, there are a few. 

Speaking of genetics; I spoke to one of the researchers in the recent tiger genome study,  you were quite right, the results there support that the numbat is indeed their closest relative, I stand corrected. Again. 

Not sure which one that is, sounds very interesting though, can you expand? There's been quite a few apparently. 

With Sykes being discredited it makes you wonder why they're still towing the 'local decedants' line, i'm sure they'd provide another sample.

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Essan

If this is to be believed Cheddar Man wasnt our ancestor anyway, he and his people, who went on to build Stonehenge, were largely wiped out and replaced by immigrants from Europe ....

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/feb/21/arrival-of-beaker-folk-changed-britain-forever-ancient-dna-study-shows

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Everdred
3 hours ago, Essan said:

If this is to be believed Cheddar Man wasnt our ancestor anyway, he and his people, who went on to build Stonehenge, were largely wiped out and replaced by immigrants from Europe ....

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/feb/21/arrival-of-beaker-folk-changed-britain-forever-ancient-dna-study-shows

Evidence suggests that British hunter-gatherers like Cheddar Man contributed a small but detectable amount of ancestry to modern Britons. Cheddar Man's cousins in Western Europe contributed a more significant amount of ancestry to modern Britains, by mixing with the Neolithic farmers who spread there way along the Mediterranean and eventually up into Britain. These farmers are the ones who built Stonehenge (or at least the earlier portions of it--the present stone structure dates right around the time of the Bell Beaker incursion). Then these Bell Beaker folk, who genetically were descendants of the Yamnaya Steppe Pastoralists (the Proto-Indo-Europeans), migrated into Britain. Their genetic legacy is most pronounced in Y-DNA lineages--R1b-M269 is their characteristic lineage, reaching 80-90% in different parts of the British Isles. But maternally and autosomally their impact wasn't quite as high, and we still see significant ancestry from the hunter-gatherers and farmers that preceded them.

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hetrodoxly

Descended from 'Bell Beaker' is what i thought the majority of people believed for many years now, you'd have thought the researchers on the Cheddar Man would have known about 'Bell Beaker' before releasing that statement to the media.

I brought some 3 year old cheddar cheese i had to eat it in 3 days, that's what you call accuracy.

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