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Maryanne xoxo1993

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Essan
9 minutes ago, Carnoferox said:

Compare different vertebrates that are considered to be intelligent (corvids, cetaceans, elephants, apes, etc.) and you'll see that their bauplans are nothing alike. This idea that intelligent beings will all have a humanoid bauplan due to convergent evolution is absolute nonsense.

And then there are invertebrates to throw into the mix. 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/mar/28/alien-intelligence-the-extraordinary-minds-of-octopuses-and-other-cephalopods

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Erno86
On ‎2‎/‎15‎/‎2018 at 5:59 PM, Carnoferox said:

Darren Naish has an excellent rundown of the dinosauroid concept if you want more information.

https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/tetrapod-zoology/dinosauroids-revisited-revisited/

I've already read Naish's rundown...just after you posted this.

I'm talking about the feasibility of big-brained, highly intelligent dinosauroids, that live on other star systems.

Naish - "The notion that these dinosaurs (troodontids) were 'big brained' and therefore 'intelligent' seems to have given rise to a myth, however: that these were really smart dinosaurs, approaching anthropod level in terms of their ability to solve problems and understand the world around them."

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Erno86
25 minutes ago, Essan said:

Octopuses and other cephalopods are intelligent, but given the nature, that they don't have two legs/feet/two arms and hands that can build and operate a nuts an bolts starship...will make them a heck of a lot harder to accomplish that feat.

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Essan
1 minute ago, Erno86 said:

Octopuses and other cephalopods are intelligent, but given the nature, that they don't have two legs/feet/two arms and hands that can build and operate a nuts an bolts starship...will make them a heck of a lot harder to accomplish that feat.

No, they have eight arms that can build and operate a nuts and bolts starship ;) 

Obviously on our world they are constrained by their aquatic lifestyle.  But if they had evolved lungs instead of fish .....

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Carnoferox
21 minutes ago, Erno86 said:

I've already read Naish's rundown...just after you posted this.

I'm talking about the feasibility of big-brained, highly intelligent dinosauroids, that live on other star systems.

Naish - "The notion that these dinosaurs (troodontids) were 'big brained' and therefore 'intelligent' seems to have given rise to a myth, however: that these were really smart dinosaurs, approaching anthropod level in terms of their ability to solve problems and understand the world around them."

Both he and I have already explained why the idea of the dinosauroid is outdated and inaccurate. Are you going to actually bring anything to this discussion instead of just quoting other people and not elaborating?

Edited by Carnoferox
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Erno86
1 minute ago, Essan said:

No, they have eight arms that can build and operate a nuts and bolts starship ;) 

Obviously on our world they are constrained by their aquatic lifestyle.  But if they had evolved lungs instead of fish .....

Yet how could they defend themselves against land based creatures? In order to do so...they would have to evolve more than just lungs --- imho.

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Erno86
2 minutes ago, Carnoferox said:

Both he and I have already explained why the idea of the dinosauroid is outdated and inaccurate. Are you going to actually bring anything to this discussion?

I don't think it is outdated...because I have a laser holographic image photograph of an alien dinosauroid.

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Carnoferox
Just now, Erno86 said:

I don't think it is outdated...because I have a laser holographic image photograph of an alien dinosauroid.

Care to elaborate?

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Essan
1 hour ago, Erno86 said:

Yet how could they defend themselves against land based creatures? In order to do so...they would have to evolve more than just lungs --- imho.

How would walking fish have defended themselves against land based octopoids had the latter been the first to colonise the land ;)    A quite feasible scenario IMO

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Orphalesion
On 2/15/2018 at 11:52 PM, Carnoferox said:

The dinosauroid is an outdated speculative evolution concept from a 1982 paper (link) by paleontologist Dale Russell and sculptor Ron Seguin. In the paper they hypothesized that some small theropod dinosaurs (in this case Stenonychosaurus) may have evolved into intelligent beings had they not gone extinct. Seguin created a model of an upright, large-brained humanoid with reptilian features to represent this hypothetical descendant of Stenonychosaurus. Nowadays we know that Stenonychosaurus and its relatives would have been feathered and significantly more bird-like; such a human-like body plan for a descendant is unlikely as well.  Interestingly, Russell and Seguin's dinosauroid predates the fringe idea of reptilian aliens and probably was an influence for it.

And the Greys as an archetype originate from a paper by H.G. Wells about future human evolution: https://mikejay.net/man-of-the-year-million/

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stereologist

There is the assumption that a water based creature which is intelligent would have to defend itself against other land based species. Why? Look at whales. They turned to the seas and do just fine. Mosasaurs became snakes (I think that is the  evolutionary path). What if a distant world does not create a system like ours? Can a mollusca become a land animal? Yes.

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