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Graphene filter can make seawater drinkable


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This sounds like a wonderful thing. I wonder if there will be household sized filters available ..... I suppose they will start off with commercial ones.

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There was brief discussion recently on current desalination systems and there deficiencies.This is welcome news and the kind of tech we need to improve the current process.As desalination becomes more prevalent and used at industrial levels I worry tho about the effects of by product released back into the ocean in the form of high concentrations of salt and other pollutants. This article points out desalination as NOT a viable solution  http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20170412-is-the-world-running-out-of-fresh-water  but cant help but feel the demand for freshwater will out weigh any economic and enviormental costs it creates. My hope is future technology such as graphene filtration and other improvements will make this process more viable.

Its interesting to note Israels contributions...as in above link...as well as what Australia has done in order to combat the demand for fresh water.

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So in therory, we can keep any rise in ocean levels to a minimum, turning the deserts green, and providing food and jobs for millions of folk? And clean some of the pollutants out of the ocean too.

So that's a win, win, win, win, win situation?

 

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Its just a small clog on the machines required to make the whole picture grand again ... making a future that is not so bleak for future generations

 

~

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21 minutes ago, third_eye said:

Its just a small clog on the machines required to make the whole picture grand again ... making a future that is not so bleak for future generations

 

~

Image result for small clogThis is a small clog. :P 

 

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Just now, ouija ouija said:

This is a small clog. :P 

Trust you to go Dutch on myself with this occasion ... :lol:

~

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Truly, graphene is a "miracle substance" with applications ranging from aerospace, super capacitors, filtration and more.

Go graphene!!

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5 hours ago, .ZZ. said:

We were purifying seawater when I was in the Navy in 1965-70.

meh...

Its been around a long time ZZ. My father served in the merchant marines from 42 to 45. They used large boilers to generate steam to extracted the freshwater. 

Considering the countless people that feel the effects of little or no water desalination technologies will have to be considered in specifac areas. Also its easy to not think about it when we can go to our tap and fill our kettle. If we study current trends indications show in 100 yrs it will be much different story and a real concern on a burgeoning population. Im not saying its the only answer. I can see desalination being used in conjunction with other methods. But anyway to make this process more efficient is a good thing for future generations

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This is awesome! Ive been working on an idea for fresh water after a disaster. If I can do it right, they will be stackable like kiddie pools and work completely by solar evaporation. These would be used mainly in hotter climes where monsoons, cyclones, and floods are common. Best part is that they can be booted out of airplanes and choppers without damage. They will be a stop gap measure till the waters recede enough for emergency supplies to get through. If graphene can be produced cheaply I may have to shelve the idea.

Inventing is hard but oh so fun.:)

Hank 

 

 

Edited by Hankenhunter
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Yes, yes, cool, et cetera, but I'm already tired of hearing about these graphene wonders and never touching or even seeing one with my own eyes. Hi-tech exhibitions don't count.

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On 17/02/2018 at 7:31 AM, Derek Willis said:

But can graphene make the coffee sold at McDonald's drinkable?

Whoa there big guy. It's a sieve, not a miracle device.

Hank

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I don't think they are producing pure graphene with their process and neither is the  complexity of their process explained in any detail at all.  That said, this "graphair" would be wonderful if it is as easy to accomplish as the story insinuates.  Sounds like one of those "ten years from now with millions of dollars of research money......" things.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 2/17/2018 at 2:32 AM, Chaldon said:

Yes, yes, cool, et cetera, but I'm already tired of hearing about these graphene wonders and never touching or even seeing one with my own eyes. Hi-tech exhibitions don't count.

Generally, "exhibitions" necessarily precede investor-fueled production.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Not impressed. How much pressure is needed to push the water through? It just looks like standard reverse osmosis to me.    

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