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Ikki

Preserved memories of Ireland's prehistory?

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Ikki

In the light of new discoveries about migrations, plagues, and population replacement in the third millenium BC, it's interesting to read some of the entries from the Annals of the Four Masters, a 17th century pseudohistorical chronicle about the prehistory of Ireland:

Anno mundi 2820 (2380 BC): "Nine thousand of Parthalon's people died in one week [...] Ireland was thirty years waste till Neimhidh's arrival."

Anno mundi 2859 (2341 BC): "Neimhidh afterwards died of a plague, together with three thousand persons."

Anno mundi 3066 (2134 BC): "[...] After this Ireland was a wilderness for a period of two hundred years."

The archaeologist Richard Warner has previously drawn attention to some linkages between the Irish annals and prehistoric chronology. It seems that histories of legendary migrations might have some basis in actual events.

What do you think? Pseudohistory or faint memories of a real prehistory?

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Harte

It CAN be both, you know.

Harte

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Windowpane

I think it's been suggested that accounts of some celestial events from the 1st millennium AD might have found their way into the Annals of the Four Masters.

As for the events in remoter eras, though, I would think it most unlikely.  What evidence is there that accurate chronological records were being kept that far back?

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jaylemurph
6 hours ago, Ikki said:

In the light of new discoveries about migrations, plagues, and population replacement in the third millenium BC, it's interesting to read some of the entries from the Annals of the Four Masters, a 17th century pseudohistorical chronicle about the prehistory of Ireland:

Anno mundi 2820 (2380 BC): "Nine thousand of Parthalon's people died in one week [...] Ireland was thirty years waste till Neimhidh's arrival."

Anno mundi 2859 (2341 BC): "Neimhidh afterwards died of a plague, together with three thousand persons."

Anno mundi 3066 (2134 BC): "[...] After this Ireland was a wilderness for a period of two hundred years."

The archaeologist Richard Warner has previously drawn attention to some linkages between the Irish annals and prehistoric chronology. It seems that histories of legendary migrations might have some basis in actual events.

What do you think? Pseudohistory or faint memories of a real prehistory?

Well, plagues are not uncommon in history. Even lots of people dying from one is not unusual, so I don't see how the Book of Four Masters is any more or less true for citing a plague.

--Jaylemurph

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Piney
1 minute ago, jaylemurph said:

Well, plagues are not uncommon in history. Even lots of people dying from one is not unusual, so I don't see how the Book of Four Masters is any more or less true for citing a plague.

--Jaylemurph

The Indo-Europeans brought yersinia pestis in with them.

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Harte

And curry.

Harte

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Kenemet

I'm skeptical.  

Ireland's not a relatively untouched culture - unlike, say, some of the Polynesian Islands or Australia (for example) but rather it's a place that's traded extensively with other cultures and has been overrun by many other cultures:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prehistoric_Ireland#Copper_and_Bronze_Ages_(2500–500_BC)  Without further evidence, I would find "memories of ancient stories" to be not quite as credible in areas where lots of people have come through with lots of different stories from across the world.

And, speaking as someone who's written fiction, it's pretty easy to fabricate a culture with heroic deeds and plagues and wars.  I don't think the writer of this piece (which, as you say is fiction) was listening to the Akashic Record Player's Greatest Hits List.

 

Edited by Kenemet
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