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Opus Magnus

Why did Iscariot betray Jesus?

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Opus Magnus

There is a thought that has been going on for a while, and it seems it might be proper for discussion.

Why did Judas Iscariot betray Jesus for only thirty shekels of silver? 

First of all, lets understand the ancient value of silver. Thirty shekels of silver is about equal to fifteen ounces of silver. One shekel is one half ounce of silver. One ounce of silver is $20.06 today. So, thirty shekels of silver is about three hundred dollars.

But, was silver worth more two thousand years ago? Well, in the Torah, silver is a big deal, and payments must be exact with the law. For a man to pay to pledge an oath, he would pay fifty shekel of silver, but the cost of a woman to pledge an oath is only thirty shekels of silver. Also, everytime going to the temple, the law was everyone pays a half shekel of silver, whether rich or poor, one half shekel no more and no less. So, that's like paying five dollars everytime going to church, which was to pay off the plague.

So, Judas Iscariot pretty much took the price of a woman, and can't even be called a man. So, he ended up hanging himself, and then the guy who inherited the cursed thirty shekels bought a graveyard and tripped and was disembowled and died after buying it as described in the book of Acts.

So, thirty shekels of silver seems like a low price even in ancient time.

So, how do you feel about this? What reason would Iscariot have to betray his friend and teacher for such a small price?

Prophetically the price was set years before in the book of Hosea, in the prophecy of idol shepherds. But, why would a man like Iscariot fall for betraying his friend and filling the role as described in the Gospel. This idea always leaves me wondering as to what was going through his mind at the time.

Edited by Opus Magnus
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MysticWolf
32 minutes ago, Opus Magnus said:

There is a thought that has been going on for a while, and it seems it might be proper for discussion.

Why did Judas Iscariot betray Jesus for only thirty shekels of silver? 

First of all, lets understand the ancient value of silver. Thirty shekels of silver is about equal to fifteen ounces of silver. One shekel is one half ounce of silver. One ounce of silver is $20.06 today. So, thirty shekels of silver is about three hundred dollars.

But, was silver worth more two thousand years ago? Well, in the Torah, silver is a big deal, and payments must be exact with the law. For a man to pay to pledge an oath, he would pay fifty shekel of silver, but the cost of a woman to pledge an oath is only thirty shekels of silver. Also, everytime going to the temple, the law was everyone pays a half shekel of silver, whether rich or poor, one half shekel no more and no less. So, that's like paying five dollars everytime going to church, which was to pay off the plague.

So, Judas Iscariot pretty much took the price of a woman, and can't even be called a man. So, he ended up hanging himself, and then the guy who inherited the cursed thirty shekels bought a graveyard and tripped and was disembowled and died after buying it as described in the book of Acts.

So, thirty shekels of silver seems like a low price even in ancient time.

So, how do you feel about this? What reason would Iscariot have to betray his friend and teacher for such a small price?

Prophetically the price was set years before in the book of Hosea, in the prophecy of idol shepherds. But, why would a man like Iscariot fall for betraying his friend and filling the role as described in the Gospel. This idea always leaves me wondering as to what was going through his mind at the time.

Jesus betrayed Judas.

Edited by Mystic Crusader
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Opus Magnus
15 minutes ago, Mystic Crusader said:

Jesus betrayed Judas.

Yeah, that's considerable. That Jesus betrayed us all by accepting his crucifixation. There was that disciple next to his side who cut off the soldiers 's ear when they came to get him. But Jesus says, " No, don't protect me." and heals the ear of the soldier. Paraphrased. All knowing, that if he were to die, that all his disciples would get hunted next. And apparently only one of the twelve apostles died a natural death, all the others were killed sooner or later. So, if Jesus might have accepted his friend's help, maybe nobody would have had to be killed. But he says there was more to be gained in death.

Also, maybe Iscariot was just tired of the long journey and wanted a quick way out. Kind of like the guy from the Matrix film who makes a deal with the agents to get the blue pill back and reenter the matrix with wealth.

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The Narcisse

Jesus asked Judas to do it.

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Opus Magnus
24 minutes ago, The Narcisse said:

Jesus asked Judas to do it.

Yeah, sort of. Apparently he already knew it was Iscariot who was going to betray him. So, at the last supper, he told Iscariot to go do what you need to do, and the spirit of the Devil entered into Iscariot, and he went off to tell the Pharisees who Jesus was by marking him with a kiss.

Also, there were signs. At the foot washing, which personally is disgusting to me. It was said the one who raises his heel against the Son of Man would be the traitor. So, apparently Iscariot raised his heel to Jesus, and showed no shame. Which seems sort of gay to me.

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MysticWolf
49 minutes ago, Opus Magnus said:

Yeah, that's considerable. That Jesus betrayed us all by accepting his crucifixation.

You twisted what I said around, but:

22+Matthew+26:39-42+(NKJV).jpg

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Opus Magnus
14 minutes ago, Mystic Crusader said:

You twisted what I said around, but:

22+Matthew+26:39-42+(NKJV).jpg

Yeah, I don't know how that's betraying Judas Iscariot, but what it means to me, is that even Jesus was afraid to die and even cared about his own life. That if even Jesus can't obtain total perfection and fearlessness, then it's not going to be possible to completely impress God with what he asks for. It means forgiveness for things like the complaining in Exodus while wandering in the desert, and the rules about the mark of the beast that it appears impossible to conquer.

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MysticWolf
1 minute ago, Opus Magnus said:

Yeah, I don't know how that's betraying Judas Iscariot, but what it means to me, is that even Jesus was afraid to die and even cared about his own life. That if even Jesus can't obtain total perfection and fearlessness, then it's not going to be possible to completely impress God with what he asks for. It means forgiveness for things like the complaining in Exodus while wandering in the desert, and the rules about the mark of the beast that it appears impossible to conquer.

Jesus did not accept his crucifixion.

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Opus Magnus
1 minute ago, Mystic Crusader said:

Jesus did not accept his crucifixion.

No, it seems to me like he did. He knew the future that it was going to happen, but only briefly tried to stop it right before the end. However, he still went through his persecution without struggling too much.

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Will Due

Judas Iscariot

139:12.1

Judas Iscariot, the twelfth apostle, was chosen by Nathaniel. He was born in Kerioth, a small town in southern Judea. When he was a lad, his parents moved to Jericho, where he lived and had been employed in his father’s various business enterprises until he became interested in the preaching and work of John the Baptist. Judas’s parents were Sadducees, and when their son joined John’s disciples, they disowned him.

1,566

When Nathaniel met Judas at Tarichea, he was seeking employment with a fish-drying enterprise at the lower end of the Sea of Galilee. He was thirty years of age and unmarried when he joined the apostles. He was probably the best-educated man among the twelve and the only Judean in the Master’s apostolic family. Judas had no outstanding trait of personal strength, though he had many outwardly appearing traits of culture and habits of training. He was a good thinker but not always a truly honest thinker. Judas did not really understand himself; he was not really sincere in dealing with himself.

139:12.3

Andrew appointed Judas treasurer of the twelve, a position which he was eminently fitted to hold, and up to the time of the betrayal of his Master he discharged the responsibilities of his office honestly, faithfully, and most efficiently.

139:12.4

There was no special trait about Jesus which Judas admired above the generally attractive and exquisitely charming personality of the Master. Judas was never able to rise above his Judean prejudices against his Galilean associates; he would even criticize in his mind many things about Jesus. Him whom eleven of the apostles looked upon as the perfect man, as the “one altogether lovely and the chiefest among ten thousand,” this self-satisfied Judean often dared to criticize in his own heart. He really entertained the notion that Jesus was timid and somewhat afraid to assert his own power and authority.

139:12.5

Judas was a good business man. It required tact, ability, and patience, as well as painstaking devotion, to manage the financial affairs of such an idealist as Jesus, to say nothing of wrestling with the helter-skelter business methods of some of his apostles. Judas really was a great executive, a farseeing and able financier. And he was a stickler for organization. None of the twelve ever criticized Judas. As far as they could see, Judas Iscariot was a matchless treasurer, a learned man, a loyal (though sometimes critical) apostle, and in every sense of the word a great success. The apostles loved Judas; he was really one of them. He must have believed in Jesus, but we doubt whether he really loved the Master with a whole heart. The case of Judas illustrates the truthfulness of that saying: “There is a way that seems right to a man, but the end thereof is death.” It is altogether possible to fall victim to the peaceful deception of pleasant adjustment to the paths of sin and death. Be assured that Judas was always financially loyal to his Master and his fellow apostles. Money could never have been the motive for his betrayal of the Master.

139:12.6

Judas was an only son of unwise parents. When very young, he was pampered and petted; he was a spoiled child. As he grew up, he had exaggerated ideas about his self-importance. He was a poor loser. He had loose and distorted ideas about fairness; he was given to the indulgence of hate and suspicion. He was an expert at misinterpretation of the words and acts of his friends. All through his life Judas had cultivated the habit of getting even with those whom he fancied had mistreated him. His sense of values and loyalties was defective.

139:12.7

To Jesus, Judas was a faith adventure. From the beginning the Master fully understood the weakness of this apostle and well knew the dangers of admitting him to fellowship. But it is the nature of the Sons of God to give every created being a full and equal chance for salvation and survival. Jesus wanted not only the mortals of this world but the onlookers of innumerable other worlds to know that, when doubts exist as to the sincerity and wholeheartedness of a creature’s devotion to the kingdom, it is the invariable practice of the Judges of men fully to receive the doubtful candidate. The door of eternal life is wide open to all; “whosoever will may come”; there are no restrictions or qualifications save the faith of the one who comes.

1,567

This is just the reason why Jesus permitted Judas to go on to the very end, always doing everything possible to transform and save this weak and confused apostle. But when light is not honestly received and lived up to, it tends to become darkness within the soul. Judas grew intellectually regarding Jesus’ teachings about the kingdom, but he did not make progress in the acquirement of spiritual character as did the other apostles. He failed to make satisfactory personal progress in spiritual experience.

139:12.9

Judas became increasingly a brooder over personal disappointment, and finally he became a victim of resentment. His feelings had been many times hurt, and he grew abnormally suspicious of his best friends, even of the Master. Presently he became obsessed with the idea of getting even, anything to avenge himself, yes, even betrayal of his associates and his Master.

139:12.10

But these wicked and dangerous ideas did not take definite shape until the day when a grateful woman broke an expensive box of incense at Jesus’ feet. This seemed wasteful to Judas, and when his public protest was so sweepingly disallowed by Jesus right there in the hearing of all, it was too much. That event determined the mobilization of all the accumulated hate, hurt, malice, prejudice, jealousy, and revenge of a lifetime, and he made up his mind to get even with he knew not whom; but he crystallized all the evil of his nature upon the oneinnocent person in all the sordid drama of his unfortunate life just because Jesus happened to be the chief actor in the episode which marked his passing from the progressive kingdom of light into that self-chosen domain of darkness.

139:12.11

The Master many times, both privately and publicly, had warned Judas that he was slipping, but divine warnings are usually useless in dealing with embittered human nature. Jesus did everything possible, consistent with man’s moral freedom, to prevent Judas’s choosing to go the wrong way. The great test finally came. The son of resentment failed; he yielded to the sour and sordid dictates of a proud and vengeful mind of exaggerated self-importance and swiftly plunged on down into confusion, despair, and depravity.

139:12.12

Judas then entered into the base and shameful intrigue to betray his Lord and Master and quickly carried the nefarious scheme into effect. During the outworking of his anger-conceived plans of traitorous betrayal, he experienced moments of regret and shame, and in these lucid intervals he faintheartedly conceived, as a defense in his own mind, the idea that Jesus might possibly exert his power and deliver himself at the last moment.

139:12.13

When the sordid and sinful business was all over, this renegade mortal, who thought lightly of selling his friend for thirty pieces of silver to satisfy his long-nursed craving for revenge, rushed out and committed the final act in the drama of fleeing from the realities of mortal existence—suicide.

139:12.14

The eleven apostles were horrified, stunned. Jesus regarded the betrayer only with pity. The worlds have found it difficult to forgive Judas, and his name has become eschewed throughout a far-flung universe.

 

 

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WoIverine

"Then Satan entered Judas, called Iscariot, one of the Twelve. And Judas went to the chief priests and the officers of the temple guard and discussed with them how he might betray Jesus."

Luke 22:3-4

He comes to steal, kill and destroy, that's his game. It's likely he hit Judas where he was weak, greed, love of money, etc. Once a foot gets in the door...it's on.

"Be alert and of sober mind. Your enemy the devil prowls around like a roaring lion looking for someone to devour."

1 Peter 5:8

Since the beginning, Satan has known his days are numbered. Various interpretations suggest that he also knew of the coming Messiah and was on the lookout for Him.
 

Edited by WoIverine
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Opus Magnus

Yeah, that has a little about myself wondering if it's me being the Iscariot. Though some part of me tells me it's right to be angry.

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WoIverine
5 minutes ago, Opus Magnus said:

Yeah, that has a little about myself wondering if it's me being the Iscariot. Though some part of me tells me it's right to be angry.

It's awesome that you're looking into things, God loves you, the desire you have for truth might even be from Him. :tu:

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Opus Magnus

Yeah, hopefully so. If my memory serves correctly, in one of the Gospels, all of the disciples asked Jesus if they were the traitor, but in another one it was only Iscariot who asked.

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Will Due

 

Is it I?

 

 

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Essan

Its a story.  It isnt necessarily true ;) 

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Opus Magnus

Yeah, it's actually a spell, Go Spel. But there are supposedly records of St. Paul's physical existance.

And I don't think it's you Will. But if all the other apostles doubt Iscariot is the real Iscariot, then it seems there's no way out.

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Brother_Spirit
Posted (edited)

It's possible that Jesus asked Judas to betray him. That Judas was actually on a mission.

It was only a matter of time before the authorities got their hands on Jesus.

The Gospel of Judas, an apocryphal text, might give us some clues:

http://abcnews.go.com/Primetime/story?id=1810169&page=1

Edited by Clockwork_Spirit

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and then
1 hour ago, Clockwork_Spirit said:

It's possible that Jesus asked Judas to betray him. That Judas was actually on a mission.

It was only a matter of time before the authorities got their hands on Jesus.

The Gospel of Judas, an apocryphal text, might give us some clues:

http://abcnews.go.com/Primetime/story?id=1810169&page=1

That would indicate that the Christ CAUSED Satan to enter Judas.  That doesn't sound plausible, regardless what the Mystic-man may say about it ;) 

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MysticWolf
6 hours ago, Clockwork_Spirit said:

It's possible that Jesus asked Judas to betray him. That Judas was actually on a mission.

It was only a matter of time before the authorities got their hands on Jesus.

The Gospel of Judas, an apocryphal text, might give us some clues:

http://abcnews.go.com/Primetime/story?id=1810169&page=1

That's just plain crazy, who would willfully set them self up to be hated?

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South Alabam

He was simply a traitor and would betray Christ. And Jesus knowing this, foretold it, before it happened.

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DirtyDocMartens

Maybe it’s a myth. Or maybe the details were made up to fill in the gaps. Or maybe the story was translated wrong. 

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Brother_Spirit
Posted (edited)
11 hours ago, and then said:

That would indicate that the Christ CAUSED Satan to enter Judas.  That doesn't sound plausible, regardless what the Mystic-man may say about it ;) 

Not at all. That would indicate that Judas was a favored disciple of Jesus. That there was some kind of understanding between them.

Edited by Clockwork_Spirit

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Brother_Spirit
Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, Mystic Crusader said:

That's just plain crazy, who would willfully set them self up to be hated?

 Jesus said, “My kingdom is not of this world. If it were, my servants would fight to prevent my arrest by the Jewish leaders. But now my kingdom is from another place.”

- John 18:36

 

Edited by Clockwork_Spirit

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Will Due
28 minutes ago, Clockwork_Spirit said:

But now my kingdom is from another place.”

 

Jesus said, "my kingdom is a spiritual dominion, even the brotherhood of men who, through faith and by love, have become the sons of God."

 

 

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