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Waspie_Dwarf

12 New Hubble Images Released

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Waspie_Dwarf

Messier 58

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m58.png?itok=v91qp4wz

Discovered in 1779 by Charles Messier, M58 was one of the first galaxies recognized to have a spiral shape and is one of four barred spiral galaxies in Messier’s catalog. M58 is one of the brightest galaxies in the constellation Virgo. Located roughly 62 million light-years from Earth, M58 is the most distant Messier object.

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Messier 59

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m59_0.jpg?itok=q4VrwgTv

M59 is one of the largest elliptical galaxies in the Virgo galaxy cluster. However, it is still considerably less massive, and at a magnitude of 9.8, less luminous than other elliptical galaxies in the cluster.

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Messier 62

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m62_0.jpg?itok=agAXENfQ

M62 is known for being one of the most irregularly shaped globular clusters in our galaxy. This might be because it is one of the closest globular clusters to the center of our galaxy and is affected by galactic tidal forces, displacing many of the cluster’s stars toward the southeast.

arrow3.gif  Read More: NASA

 

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Messier 75

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m75_0.png?itok=TFG8tpCt

This beautiful image features the globular star cluster M75. Discovered in 1780 by Pierre Méchain, M75 was also observed by Charles Messier and added to his catalog later that year.

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Messier 86

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m86.png?itok=5qNyezq_

Located in the constellation Virgo, M86 is either an elliptical galaxy or a lenticular galaxy (a cross between an elliptical and spiral galaxy). This Hubble observation of M86 was taken in near-infrared and visible light using the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 and the Advanced Camera for Surveys. Featuring about half of the galaxy, it shows the bright central nucleus and surrounding regions of light. The image also reveals globular clusters in M86 (shown as points of light) and an edge-on galaxy (found to the lower left of M86’s core).

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Messier 88

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m88_0.jpg?itok=YWMyEaiq

Located approximately 47 million light-years away, M88 is a spiral galaxy with well-defined and symmetrical arms. Although it is a member of the Virgo cluster of galaxies, it appears in the neighboring constellation of Coma Berenices.

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Messier 89

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m89.png?itok=uZb_pubD

M89 is one of eight galaxies in the Virgo cluster that Charles Messier discovered in 1781. An elliptical galaxy, M89 is almost exactly circular. It is located about 50 million light-years away in the constellation Virgo.

arrow3.gif  Read More: NASA

 

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Messier 90

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m90_0.jpg?itok=BBCJxs6D

M90 is a bright, beautiful spiral galaxy situated in the Virgo cluster of galaxies. Located in the constellation Virgo, this galaxy is approximately 59 million light-years away from Earth and has a magnitude of 9.5. M90 is believed to be breaking away from the rest of the galaxies in the Virgo cluster and is one of the few galaxies traveling toward our Milky Way galaxy, not away.

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Messier 95

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m95_0.jpg?itok=-47BDuM7

Found in the constellation Leo, M95 is a beautiful barred spiral galaxy. It was discovered in 1781 by Pierre Méchain, a colleague of Charles Messier.

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Messier 98

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m98.png?itok=s9Kk4s3V

This image of M98 was taken in 1995 with Hubble’s Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. Its stair-step pattern results from the design of the camera. These observations were taken in infrared and visible light and feature a portion of the galaxy near the central core. Although it is a member of the Virgo cluster of galaxies, M98 appears in the neighboring constellation of Coma Berenices. Hubble’s observations of M98 were part of an examination of the cores of galaxies in the Virgo cluster.

arrow3.gif  Read More: NASA

 

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Messier 108

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m108.png?itok=iOGYobcU

M108, or the Surfboard galaxy, is located in the constellation Ursa Major approximately 46 million light-years away. It is called the Surfboard galaxy because, when viewed with a telescope, it is seen nearly edge-on with no apparent bulge or pronounced core.

arrow3.gif  Read More: NASA

 

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Messier 110

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m110.png?itok=nqxzmNFa

Located in the constellation Andromeda, M110 was discovered in 1773 by Charles Messier. It is a satellite galaxy of the Andromeda galaxy (M31) and a member of the Local Group, which is made up of the galaxies located closest to the Milky Way (our Milky Way is considered a member of the Local Group as well). M110 is approximately 2,690,000 light-years away from Earth and has a magnitude of 8.

arrow3.gif  Read More: NASA

 

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susieice

Pictures from Hubble are just beautiful. How awesome is the universe.

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