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Not A Rockstar

Ancient Technology In Egypt

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Not A Rockstar

I ran into this 15 minute video which is actually an ad for some coming tour to Egypt by a guy I never heard of so know nothing of his reputation or anything. What interested me was the artifacts in the Cairo Museum he features to support his ideas. 

It begins with an apparent mistake, a block being worked which broke while cutting the future planned lid free. He makes a lot about the saws needed. To me this is not too mysterious as these folks were experts working with stone, and people who could cut a pillar out and carve it into a lotus petal effect can cut a lid. How they did it is not something I know but they were very advanced and masters with stone, so while interesting I am not surprised. It is interesting to see, though. I am always impressed by what our ancestors could do.

One he called the shish (sp? idk know this word) bowl, which appears tough enough for us to make now as artisans let alone how old it supposedly is. It was found with 30k of pottery items dated as pre-dynastic, yet rival some of the work I saw while roaming about in Turkey with stone for pottery and bowls. He says it needed a lathe to make and at such a high velocity it infers a machine of some sort. Perhaps. IDK.

There are 10 and 12 foot tall sarcophagus I would be grateful for our experts to remark on. Were a few people that tall? Did they have the occasional basketball player before his time? Or are these known to be for another purpose?

Towards the very end he shows a curious boxlike object with sort of dips in the top which do honestly seem to take something more like a high speed process to make so uniformly. Given the date on it (he says 12k years old?) I wonder about ideas that before our culture and history rose up maybe there was a civilization before that died out and maybe some items were reused for a time in ancient Egypt and known about?

I do not believe we had ET running around doing all of this, I will be candid about that. I am asking sincere questions about what is known of these items please, and hoping to learn a lot from discussions about the many things here in this video, irrespective of whatever reputation this fellow has or doesn't. I am fine if his information is wrong, I would just like to know more about these things and the technology they had then. One item really appears to have been drilled into like a tube almost. Plus, they had boomerangs?? Really? What are those really, experts, please?

Anyway, here it is, please enjoy and comment if only to share what surprises you in it. About 15 minutes with book ads at the end. IDK this guy and have nothing to do with that. It sounds a bit fringe, but the film is what it is and interesting nevertheless. 

 

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Alien Origins

Hi....The tall sarcophagus is not unusual at all...A King Tut exhibit I visited here where I live had the top piece of Tut's sarcophagus....The thing was at least 10 feet tall it towered above everything in the room...Now having said that a lot of the pieces were replicas made by the University of Texas I believe...Most of the artifacts that were found in Tuts Tomb are in such bad shape that they will not let them leave the country.....Now some of the jewelry was reported real I don't know. The Egyptians did nothing small.... 

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Not A Rockstar
2 minutes ago, Alien Origins said:

Hi....The tall sarcophagus is not unusual at all...A King Tut exhibit I visited here where I live had the top piece of Tut's sarcophagus....The thing was at least 10 feet tall it towered above everything in the room...Now having said that a lot of the pieces were replicas made by the University of Texas I believe...Most of the artifacts that were found in Tuts Tomb are in such bad shape that they will not let them leave the country.....Now some of the jewelry was reported real I don't know. The Egyptians did nothing small.... 

When I saw the Tut exhibit in the 70's and later when I was in Egypt got to see some there, they just seemed proportionately wider if they were tall and one of the outer cases/sarcophagus versus the inner one. Perhaps it is just seeing these in film which makes them seem taller. It could be they have mixed inner and outer cases here and lump them in together. 

Seeing Tut was great, wasn't it? :)

 

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Alien Origins

Yeah it was great....There were three sarcophagus, the top, inner and then the one that actually covered the body...I could be wrong though. 

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Harte

Hidden Inca Tours is the property of Brien Foerster, a lying sack o'sheet.

Harte

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Not A Rockstar
4 minutes ago, Harte said:

Hidden Inca Tours is the property of Brien Foerster, a lying sack o'sheet.

Harte

still wanna know what da pictures be about :). As I didn't know the name I assumed it was fringe but the pics are da pics.

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Windowpane
17 minutes ago, Harte said:

Hidden Inca Tours is the property of Brien Foerster, a lying sack o'sheet.

 

He's mentioned (in connection with Egypt) here and here; and, in connection with Peru, here (Fr. lang.)

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Alien Origins
Posted (edited)

Links  to Colavito's site...That guy complains about everything he sees....And I don't  like his smug arrogant attitude.

Edited by Alien Origins
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Alien Origins
32 minutes ago, Harte said:

Hidden Inca Tours is the property of Brien Foerster, a lying sack o'sheet.

Harte

Good to know Harte thanks man.

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Windowpane
33 minutes ago, Alien Origins said:

Links  to Colavito's site...That guy complains about everything he sees....And I don't  like his smug arrogant attitude.

All of which takes attention away from the main point: namely, that Mr. Foerster is someone whose approach to archaeological and other questions has evidently been found wanting, at least by some (and Colavito isn't the only one).

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Alien Origins
9 minutes ago, Windowpane said:

All of which takes attention away from the main point: namely, that Mr. Foerster is someone whose approach to archaeological and other questions has evidently been found wanting, at least by some (and Colavito isn't the only one).

Well this is the first I have heard of this Mr. Foerster...Anyone got a link or something? 

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Alien Origins
24 minutes ago, Harte said:

I am wondering what in that makes him a lying sack of sheet? Guess I need to Google this guy.

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Not A Rockstar

:( well I was just interested in the items shown from the museum, not this guy or what he said. I mean the items in the film are sitting there, no matter what he says. 

But OK. I will ask a friend in Egyptology what they are or where to find a reference on what is being shown there. I was not at all putting this guy up as an authority, I even said he was doubtless fringe as I never heard of him.

Thanks for your input Alien Origins. That was a great link you posted.

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Harte
1 hour ago, Alien Origins said:

I am wondering what in that makes him a lying sack of sheet? Guess I need to Google this guy.

I posted his claim concerning the Paracas skulls - "25% larger than human," when the fact is, the skull's cranial capacities (using Foerster's own numbers) are well within the normal human range.

I'm in no way associated with the medical industry, and I was able to find this out in less than 5 minutes. 

Foerster was lying, and knew he was lying.

The "25% larger than human" is that the capacities are 25% larger than the low end of the normal range of human cranial capacities.

Harte

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bison
Posted (edited)

For cutting hard stone, the ancient Egyptians had copper hand saws, onto which they could have applied abrasive quartz sand. As the sawn groove deepened, more sand could be added to it. Driven by the saw, the quartz sand could have made it possible to eventually wear away a kerf of any desired depth. All that is required, really, is sufficient patience and diligence. Our hard, fast modern tools can make us disparage these workmanlike virtues of the ancients.

The same sort of steadfastness is apparent in working fine symmetrical bowls from hard stones. A stone of roughly the correct shape could be rubbed with sand-coated cloth or animal skin, with extraordinary persistence, by our modern standards, until the finished product was attained. The slowness of the process would probably have contributed to their highly symmetrical, finely figured shapes. 

The odd-looking slab with a multitude of holes in it could be a set of mortars for grinding and storing various substances, such as culinary or medicinal herbs, or colored mineral for paints and dyes. The raised rims could help keep the different substances from getting accidentally mixed together. 

 

 

Edited by bison
removed defunct link, superfluous word
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ShadowSot
4 hours ago, Not A Rockstar said:

Given the date on it (he says 12k years old?) I wonder about ideas that before our culture and history rose up maybe there was a civilization before that died out and maybe some items were reused for a time in ancient Egypt and known about?

 Don't recogzine the object off hand, but that's definitely not 12k years old, and it's clearly Egyptian. What he calls burn marks are just normal aging, so he doesn't know much about geology. Not that I do either, but well enough to recognize such marks. 

Be nice if he knew enough to identify what the object is called. Or maybe he does, and wants to make it difficult to research.

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Not A Rockstar
4 minutes ago, ShadowSot said:

 Don't recogzine the object off hand, but that's definitely not 12k years old, and it's clearly Egyptian. What he calls burn marks are just normal aging, so he doesn't know much about geology. Not that I do either, but well enough to recognize such marks. 

Be nice if he knew enough to identify what the object is called. Or maybe he does, and wants to make it difficult to research.

That was my problem, no names so I could look things up from good sources. It looks too fine to be that old unless there was more tech than I am aware of that far back, so how to run it down without asking? I am also very curious about that pottery and what techniques they used. I do not think diamond tech needs to be there, but perhaps a sand and water abrasive process or something .... they were pretty awesome for the alleged age they came from. I have a friend who has a doctorate in this and am emailing her now to ask what this supposed huge find of 30k pottery was and if there is a report I can access to read about it, but catching her is like a lotto. :)

The tech to make something that detailed and smooth on that big box thing is on par with the pottery so is not out there for the Ancients to have done, I just don't know their technique and would like to.

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Harte
12 minutes ago, bison said:

For cutting hard stone, the ancient Egyptians had copper hand saws, onto which they could have applied abrasive quartz sand. As the sawn groove deepened, more sand could be added to it. Driven by the saw, the quartz sand could have made it possible to eventually wear away a kerf of any desired depth. All that is required, really, is sufficient patience and diligence. Our hard, fast modern tools can make us disparage these workmanlike virtues of the ancients.

The same sort of steadfastness is apparent in working fine symmetrical bowls from hard stones. A stone of roughly the correct shape could be rubbed with sand-coated cloth or animal skin, with extraordinary persistence, by our modern standards, until the finished product was attained. The slowness of the process would have probably have contributed to their highly symmetrical, finely figured shapes. 

That doesn't account for the narrow-necked jars made from diorite and dated to Pre-Dynastic Egypt.

But these do:

Link1

Link2

Solenhofen rears his head still every now and then on the Hancock website.

Harte

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Not A Rockstar
14 minutes ago, bison said:

For cutting hard stone, the ancient Egyptians had copper hand saws, onto which they could have applied abrasive quartz sand. As the sawn groove deepened, more sand could be added to it. Driven by the saw, the quartz sand could have made it possible to eventually wear away a kerf of any desired depth. All that is required, really, is sufficient patience and diligence. Our hard, fast modern tools can make us disparage these workmanlike virtues of the ancients.

The same sort of steadfastness is apparent in working fine symmetrical bowls from hard stones. A stone of roughly the correct shape could be rubbed with sand-coated cloth or animal skin, with extraordinary persistence, by our modern standards, until the finished product was attained. The slowness of the process would have probably have contributed to their highly symmetrical, finely figured shapes. 

 

 

I mean they cut stone right out of the quarries and made amazing things so I do not agree they somehow were unable to do these items I saw. I am just interested in them. I was thinking a water sand usage for the pottery details and they had more tools than I know of I am sure. Plus not all of appears to be granite as he inferred. There are a lot of softer materials they could have used for some of it. 

I saw this one item where they had honed the stone so thin it was a lamp and glowed because the flame inside actually got through the sides as if it was frosted glass. Talk about effort and perseverance! That certainly was not granite either, but I was very young then and do not remember what it was beyond a type of mineral/stone

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ShadowSot
Just now, Not A Rockstar said:

That was my problem, no names so I could look things up from good sources. It looks too fine to be that old unless there was more tech than I am aware of that far back, so how to run it down without asking? I

Well simply put, 12k is far outside of ancient Egypt, so no clue how he came up with that date. 

 The straight forward method would have been to quarry the block, plot out the design, and hammer and polish it out. The bowl indentions would have used a drill and abrasive. 

 From my own experience, probably would have been a stop to make the regular depth and some sort of guide. 

 

 

Just now, Not A Rockstar said:

 

 

am also very curious about that pottery and what techniques they used. I do not think diamond tech needs to be there, but perhaps a sand and water abrasive process or something .... they were pretty awesome for the alleged age they came from. I have a friend who has a doctorate in this and am emailing her now to ask what this supposed huge find of 30k pottery was and if there is a report I can access to read about it, but catching her is like a lotto. :)

If you mean the diorite vessels. There's a few threads here on the topic, as always Kmt's posts are the go to for explanations.

Just now, Not A Rockstar said:

The tech to make something that detailed and smooth on that big box thing is on par with the pottery so is not out there for the Ancients to have done, I just don't know their technique and would like to.

Or the post that Harte just made.

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Not A Rockstar
4 minutes ago, ShadowSot said:

Well simply put, 12k is far outside of ancient Egypt, so no clue how he came up with that date. 

 The straight forward method would have been to quarry the block, plot out the design, and hammer and polish it out. The bowl indentions would have used a drill and abrasive. 

 From my own experience, probably would have been a stop to make the regular depth and some sort of guide. 

 

 

If you mean the diorite vessels. There's a few threads here on the topic, as always Kmt's posts are the go to for explanations.

Or the post that Harte just made.

Diorite! Now I have a name :). That dude showed an item with drill marks and I do not find that somehow suspicious. If it was secured and they had a hand drill, there is nothing out there about that. 

Harte's links got blocked by Malwarebytes so am sorting that now. 

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ShadowSot
Just now, Not A Rockstar said:

Diorite! Now I have a name :). That dude showed an item with drill marks and I do not find that somehow suspicious. If it was secured and they had a hand drill, there is nothing out there about that. 

Yeah, drilling as a technology is ancient. Good mark of how much these folks know is when they think it was invented. 

 

Just now, Not A Rockstar said:

Harte's links got blocked by Malwarebytes so am sorting that now. 

Here's a video of granite drilling using a tube drill. 

 

 

 

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