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Mass extinction triggered age of the dinosaurs

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Not A Rockstar

This really makes you wonder what came before them and what the world was like, what lived then, if anything. 

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Podo
59 minutes ago, Not A Rockstar said:

This really makes you wonder what came before them and what the world was like, what lived then, if anything. 

Amphibians, mostly, as well as other reptiles and early proto-mammals, the synapsids.

https://www.livescience.com/43295-triassic-period.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triassic

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Permian

 

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Not A Rockstar
27 minutes ago, Podo said:

Amphibians, mostly, as well as other reptiles and early proto-mammals, the synapsids.

Thanks. That would make sense that acid would be devastating to amphibians and perhaps allow an advantage to repitles. Probabaly was also traumatic to the plant life, causing big changes in what dominated and where.

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paperdyer

Let's see...We have acid rain from smog and other stuff, global warming- I mean climate change. All we need are the volcanoes to go crazy again, then star measuring your lizards daily!  Can't think of a better reason to start pruning the reptile world awhile.

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acute
2 minutes ago, paperdyer said:

Let's see...We have acid rain from smog and other stuff, global warming- I mean climate change. All we need are the volcanoes to go crazy again, then start measuring your lizards daily!  Can't think of a better reason to start pruning the reptile world awhile.

Does this include our reptilian overlords, such as Presidents George W BushCroc and Barack Iguana, and Queen Lizard The Second?

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paperdyer
7 minutes ago, acute said:

Does this include our reptilian overlords, such as Presidents George W BushCroc and Barack Iguana, and Queen Lizard The Second?

If they're your lizards, be my guest.  You have odd names for your lizards.:rofl:

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Hammerclaw

A new study? There's nothing new about the Permian Extinction Event clearing the table and leading to the rise of the Age of Dinosaurs. 

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Carnoferox
20 minutes ago, Hammerclaw said:

A new study? There's nothing new about the Permian Extinction Event clearing the table and leading to the rise of the Age of Dinosaurs. 

This new paper isn't about the Permian mass extinction, but rather a later and lesser extinction during the Carnian stage of the Late Triassic (c. 232 Ma).

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-018-03996-1

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Tatetopa
6 hours ago, Podo said:
7 hours ago, Not A Rockstar said:

This really makes you wonder what came before them and what the world was like, what lived then, if anything. 

Amphibians, mostly, as well as other reptiles and early proto-mammals, the synapsids.

https://www.livescience.com/43295-triassic-period.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triassic

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Permian

There were great ages of marvelous creatures and an earth so different it would be hard to recognize.  Well worth the reading. The famous sail-backed Dimetrodon comes from that time as well as some big scary, long, legged. fast running, proto-crocodiles (excuse me Carnoferox)  . Dragon flies with a 2 foot wing span, 6ft long millipedes, sea scorpions and a lot more.  Check it out.  Like going to another planet almost.

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jaylemurph
24 minutes ago, Tatetopa said:

There were great ages of marvelous creatures and an earth so different it would be hard to recognize.  Well worth the reading. The famous sail-backed Dimetrodon comes from that time as well as some big scary, long, legged. fast running, proto-crocodiles (excuse me Carnoferox)  . Dragon flies with a 2 foot wing span, 6ft long millipedes, sea scorpions and a lot more.  Check it out.  Like going to another planet almost.

Look up Ediacaran Biota ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ediacaran_biota ) and then get freaked out by the fact Lovecraft seems to have been on to something nobody found out about til a few decades after he died.

--Jaylemurph

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Not A Rockstar
21 minutes ago, jaylemurph said:

Look up Ediacaran Biota ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ediacaran_biota ) and then get freaked out by the fact Lovecraft seems to have been on to something nobody found out about til a few decades after he died.

--Jaylemurph

No surprise to me, I think of some of our great sci fi writers as the prophets of our times :)  Ray Bradbury used to transfix me with some of his tales.

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Carnoferox
1 hour ago, Tatetopa said:

The famous sail-backed Dimetrodon comes from that time as well as some big scary, long, legged. fast running, proto-crocodiles (excuse me Carnoferox)  . 

You referring to Postosuchus? If so, it was indeed a terrifying creature.

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UFO_Monster

Extinctions typically lead to a massive loss of life, and opens the door for new species anyway. Doesn't really surprise me.

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Tatetopa

One of my all time favorites is Tullimonstrum from Pennsylvanian era.  A perfect candidate for the Loch Ness monster if they were about 20 times bigger: worm like body, weird neck/proboscis, aquatic, no need to surface to breathe. Read a couple of accounts of knights

killing wurms, sounds like a big tulimomstrum.  Just a little too little and too early.  Now surmised to be a lamprey kin.  And me a little too late.  Somebody wrote a book about it already.  Well, still the state fossil of Pennsylvania, not bad for a 300 year old jawless fish.

 

Image result

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Carnoferox
1 hour ago, Tatetopa said:

One of my all time favorites is Tullimonstrum from Pennsylvanian era.  A perfect candidate for the Loch Ness monster if they were about 20 times bigger: worm like body, weird neck/proboscis, aquatic, no need to surface to breathe. Read a couple of accounts of knights

killing wurms, sounds like a big tulimomstrum.  Just a little too little and too early.  Now surmised to be a lamprey kin.  And me a little too late.  Somebody wrote a book about it already.  Well, still the state fossil of Pennsylvania, not bad for a 300 year old jawless fish.

 

Image result

The vertebrate identity for Tullimonstrum has recently been questioned (see Sallan et al. 2017), so its affinities remain enigmatic as ever. It's just another one of the many Paleozoic oddities.

Edited by Carnoferox
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MissJatti

Dinosaurus had their shot, and nature selected them for extinction.

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paperdyer

Seeing that an asteroid "just missed" the Earth with very little advanced warning, we may be on borrowed time.  So as Waspie's new picture tag says - Don't Worry.

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Essan
17 hours ago, jaylemurph said:

Look up Ediacaran Biota ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ediacaran_biota ) and then get freaked out by the fact Lovecraft seems to have been on to something nobody found out about til a few decades after he died.

--Jaylemurph

Aye, but for an accident of circumstance, life on Earth could have evolved into perfectly normal creatures, rather than the utterly bizzare and unique monstrosities we have with 4 limbs and mouths in the heads!  :D

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Tatetopa
22 hours ago, Tatetopa said:

300 year old jawless fish.

 

Sorry 300 million year old I meant to say.  

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