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Still Waters

One person dies after plane engine fails

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Still Waters

A person on board a Southwest Airlines plane was killed Tuesday after the plane's left engine failed, damaging the fuselage and forcing the plane to make an emergency landing in Philadelphia, officials said.

Officials did not immediately detail what happened on board, but passengers described a terrifying experience that started when a piece of a jet engine apparently flew into a window, shattering the window and depressurizing the plane.

https://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/airplane-mode/southwest-airlines-plane-makes-emergency-landing-philadelphia-airport-n866686

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toast

That is the reason why I never book a seat parallel to the engines. I know, its a little paranoid but I feel uncomfortable sitting just some meters away from a device thats doing 10.000rpm.

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aztek

that is very fortunate that only 1 died, and plane made it relatively safely to the ground. 

 

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susieice
Posted (edited)

It was just on Philadelphia news at 11pm. The engine suffered metal fatigue and one of the blades struck the window, shattering it. The woman was half way sucked out of the plane. The female pilot brought the plane down safely. Southwest said they are checking all the engines on their aircraft for signs of metal fatigue. Scary flight for all the passengers.  It is fortunate that only one person died. Seven others were injured. This link is from an earlier broadcast.

http://6abc.com/1-dead-after-jet-blows-an-engine;-woman-nearly-sucked-out/3356147/

Edited by susieice

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pallidin

Yeah, what an absolute tragedy.

GOSH...

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pallidin

My only hope is that the NTSB will get to the bottom of this.

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pallidin

Seems like a serious maintenance failure, I guess.

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pallidin
Posted (edited)

I am very thankful that the pilots, crew and passengers handled this obviously emergency situation so well as to not cause further loss of life.

Edited by pallidin
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Daughter of the Nine Moons

 

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Dark_Grey

I hate flying. I know the safety statistics but being 30,000 feet over the ground gets my anxiety going :blink: No matter how many times I've flown, I just can't get used to it.

Incredible work by the pilot in this story, btw. Bravo!

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susieice
Posted (edited)

Pieces of this plane are turning up all over the area.

http://www.wfmz.com/731251153

pictures:

http://www.wfmz.com/news/berks/photos-pieces-of-southwest-airlines-plane-found-in-berks/731322268

Edited by susieice

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glorybebe

I flew Southwest once and wouldn't again. It was like a tin can with wings.  I was terrified the whole flight. 

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susieice
5 hours ago, glorybebe said:

I flew Southwest once and wouldn't again. It was like a tin can with wings.  I was terrified the whole flight. 

I never flew Southwest, but most planes make me a little uncomfortable. There isn't much between you and the other side of the window.

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Tatetopa
On 4/17/2018 at 1:47 PM, toast said:

That is the reason why I never book a seat parallel to the engines. I know, its a little paranoid but I feel uncomfortable sitting just some meters away from a device thats doing 10.000rpm.

Well placed paranoia, but consider the 3-4 rows back  from the engine.dangerous too.

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Tatetopa
10 hours ago, susieice said:

Southwest Air gave each passenger $5,000 and a $1,000 flight voucher.

All the survivors that is.

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Tatetopa

The pilot was very calm and awesome.  They practice one engine landings, so they have that skill to draw on.   This is from a CBS Nov.4, 2010 article:

Following an emergency landing of a Qantas A380 in Singapore, analysts speculated an "uncontained engine failure" caused the power plant's housing to disintegrate and damage the wing structure/

CBS News correspondent Celia Hatton reports that Qantas has never had a fatal accident in its 90 year history. There has never been a fatality involving an Airbus A380, and the engine failure is the most serious incident involving that type of aircraft since the model went into service in October 2007.

In the wake of the incident, here's a glance at airline engine safety:

• According to international safety statistics, there are about 25 incidents a year involving a jet engine failing either in flight or on the ground. That translates into less than one for every million flights worldwide.

• The overwhelming majority of such occurrences ends without incident because crews are trained on simulators to handle the loss of an engine.

• One of the best-known incidents of uncontained engine failure occurred in 1989, when 111 people were killed when a United Air Lines DC-10 crashed while making an emergency landing at Sioux City, Iowa. There were 185 survivors.

• In January 2009, a US Airways jetliner ditched in the Hudson River after its engines failed when the plane struck a flock of geese. All 155 people on board survived.

• More recent incidents include a Saudi Arabian Airlines 747 after takeoff from Jeddah in July 2008; a Jett8 Cargo Boeing 747 freighter after takeoff from Singapore last December; and an ACT Cargo Airbus A300 at takeoff from Bahrain in April. All ended without injury.

• The most frequent causes of engines breaking up are the ingestion of objects on the runway or birds trikes. Also, mechanical problems such as rotor imbalances can cause microscopic cracks to form on the turbine blades, leading to their failure.

• In May, the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board recommended more frequent engine inspections to deal with the problem.  END Article.

Maybe inspection frequency will increase yet again after this incident.

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susieice
22 minutes ago, Tatetopa said:

All the survivors that is.

Fortunately there was only one fatality. The airline was assisting that family also. I don't remember right off hand what was said they were doing. There are pieces of that plane spread over a wide area. I didn't realize it broke up that badly until the news started reporting it. Planes do need to be much better inspected than they are. All airlines.

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toast
4 hours ago, susieice said:

Planes do need to be much better inspected than they are. All airlines.

The global high standards for A/C maintenance are not the problem, people who dont follow the standards, maybe some of them are badly trained in the mattter, who cause problems.

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toast
4 hours ago, susieice said:

Planes do need to be much better inspected than they are. All airlines.

The global high standards for A/C maintenance are not the problem, people who dont follow the standards, maybe some of them are badly trained in the mattter, who cause problems.

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Thanato

Who ever signed off on the part of that engine that caused this failure is in some big trouble.

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