Jump to content
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Still Waters

Did neolithic man practise surgery on cows?

4 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

Still Waters

A stone age cow skull boasting a hole the size of a biscuit has been hailed as a first by archeologists, who say the gouge is the earliest evidence of either a veterinary attempt or animal experimentation.

Human skulls from around the world, some dating as far back as almost 10,000 years ago, have been found with very similar holes – evidence, say experts, of a cranial surgery called trepanation in which humans scraped away at the skull, or drilled it, to form an aperture.

But the cow skull, dating to at least 3,000 BC and found at the neolithic site of Champ-Durand in France, is the earliest example of such surgery on an animal.

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/apr/19/did-neolithic-man-practice-trepanning-on-cows

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
Not A Rockstar

Wow. I honestly think the Ancients were smarter than I was taught to think of them in schooling. This is intriguing.

... then my mind drifts off to cattle mutilations and I decide I need more coffee :).

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jmccr8
3 hours ago, Not A Rockstar said:

Wow. I honestly think the Ancients were smarter than I was taught to think of them in schooling. This is intriguing.

... then my mind drifts off to cattle mutilations and I decide I need more coffee :).

Hi Not a Rockstar

Bovine lobotomies, interesting concept I just wonder if anyone would know the difference in how they behaved afterwards.:whistle:

jmccr8

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hammerclaw

Maybe somebody was hungry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.