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Fossil footprints hint at giant sloth chase

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NicoletteS

I just want to point this out the the person who mocked me on an earlier thread for saying people probably hunted the giant ground sloths for food... to extinction. Not so ridiculous now is it.

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Seti42
Posted (edited)

I've pretty much always thought that once humankind figured out fire, knives, spears, and bows (and succinct communication)...We hunted the s**t out of everything we could. It's our nature, sadly. We are the ancestors of hard core killers. Far beyond any predator that has ever existed in the natural world.

I still think meat tastes great, though.

Edited by Seti42

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Piney
51 minutes ago, NicoletteS said:

I just want to point this out the the person who mocked me on an earlier thread for saying people probably hunted the giant ground sloths for food... to extinction. Not so ridiculous now is it.

No the extinction came from catastrophic glacier flooding, climate change and diseases related to constantly warm wet weather....:rolleyes:

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Oniomancer
Just now, Oniomancer said:

One does not normally expect to see the words sloth and chase together in the same sentence.

 

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paperdyer
On ‎4‎/‎26‎/‎2018 at 11:43 AM, Oniomancer said:

One dos not normally expect to see the words sloth and chase together in the same sentence.

It must have been a short pursuit!

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Jon the frog

They need to revive all these lost species so I can taste them on my BBQ !

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NicoletteS
Posted (edited)
On 4/26/2018 at 7:38 AM, Piney said:

No the extinction came from catastrophic glacier flooding, climate change and diseases related to constantly warm wet weather....:rolleyes:

Yeah and when I suggested people hunted them I was ridiculed and told they didn't have to worry about predators... Now they find proof of it and you think flooding wiped them out? Honestly do you think any giant animal has ever gone extinct from a flood? No. Not likely by any means. Did anything else go extinct in this great flood? Or just the things we were hunting?

Edited by NicoletteS

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Piney
10 minutes ago, NicoletteS said:

Yeah and when I suggested people hunted them I was ridiculed and told they didn't have to worry about predators... Now they find proof of it and you think flooding wiped them out? Honestly do you think any giant animal has ever gone extinct from a flood? No. Not likely by any means. Did anything else go extinct in this great flood? Or just the things we were hunting?

Your haste to assert musings as fact is very telling.

It wasn't one it was 4 major glacier lakes that cut loose and really messed up the plant life and we did hunt them, but not to extinction. The North American environment was really nasty. That's what did them in.

I have a background in archaeology, geology and anthropology. It isn't a musing. I been on a team tracking the glacier floodwater. I've been on digs that have done pollen floatation.

What is your background? 

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Hammerclaw
8 hours ago, Piney said:

It wasn't one it was 4 major glacier lakes that cut loose and really messed up the plant life and we did hunt them, but not to extinction. The North American environment was really nasty. That's what did them in.

I have a background in archaeology, geology and anthropology. It isn't a musing. I been on a team tracking the glacier floodwater. I've been on digs that have done pollen floatation.

What is your background? 

Sea levels rose, we lost our vast coastal plains that teemed with megafauna. As the ice sheets melted, they no longer had the mountain effect on atmospheric circulation over the continent and the rain belts moved south causing desertification of a great swath of the heartland. Habitat loss caused a drastic reduction of grazing and browsing species with a consequent reduction of predator species. While human predation factors into the extinction event, it was but one of many and not the most significant one at that. In fact, new discoveries are hinting at a much longer presence of man in the New World than hitherto acknowledged, on the order of tens of thousands of years, in which no such extinction event occurred.

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NicoletteS
Posted (edited)
On 5/1/2018 at 7:51 AM, Piney said:

It wasn't one it was 4 major glacier lakes that cut loose and really messed up the plant life and we did hunt them, but not to extinction. The North American environment was really nasty. That's what did them in.

I have a background in archaeology, geology and anthropology. It isn't a musing. I been on a team tracking the glacier floodwater. I've been on digs that have done pollen floatation.

What is your background? 

Do you actually think that means you tracked the demise of the last sloth? What does that have to do with pollen?  Did you even study sloths? Ever seen a piece of one?

I recently turned down an archaeology job, I do nothing. Nothing. What do you mean by background tho? I have one as well but i hardly find it relevant to have to list my formal relations in a discussion of plain observances. I've collected quite a few prehistoric fossils tho in my downtime :) I'm not going to pretend that your self proclaimed authority means people didn't hunt sloths though, because obviously they did. Also won't pretend that you studying those topics means you could possibly be aware of how each of the sloths died I mean it's a little obvious that they all met different ends extinction could hardly be justified by one means. Saying they were hunted and driven to extinction doesn't mean I'm wrong if a few members were killed by natural causes. That is just painfully obvious and wouldnt seem like a necessary disclaimer to add to the statement if I was speaking to someone educated in the matter...

Edited by NicoletteS

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Piney
Just now, NicoletteS said:

Do you actually think that means you tracked the demise of the last sloth? What does that have to do with pollen?  Did you even study sloths? Ever seen a piece of one?

I recently turned down an archaeology job, I do nothing. Nothing. I've collected quite a few prehistoric fossils tho in my downtime :) I'm not going to pretend that your self proclaimed authority means people didn't hunt sloths though, because obviously they did. Also won't pretend that you studying those topics means you could possibly be aware of how each of the sloths died I mean it's a little obvious that they all met different ends extinction could hardly be justified by one means. Saying they were hunted and driven to extinction doesn't mean I'm wrong if a few members were killed by natural causes. That is just painfully obvious and wouldnt seem like a necessary disclaimer to add to the statement if I was speaking to someone educated in the matter...

I did say we hunted sloths! I also said the pollen indicated a loss of plants which the sloths eat!  Can you read?

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Aardvark-DK

Maybe big sloths were fast, and deadly... ;)

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