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Brittanyvt

Newly discovered petroglyphs

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Brittanyvt
Posted (edited)

Approximately 2 miles from a road or trail, we stumbled upon a tucked away wall of petroglyphs in the Valley of Fire, NV.  Because of upload size limitations, this is only a screenshot from a short mp4.  One petroglyph seems to depict a shonisaurus.  Any ideas what the others depict?

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1E14U6o4_WbNaZ68HX7Fx2UNMR_3-Lu6R/view?usp=drivesdk

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1utrhuZ2v28FLCNs5qXPontxFBKXI_yOi/view?usp=drivesdk

rsz_20180520_111925.jpg

Edited by Brittanyvt
Google drive photo link addition
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danydandan

I don't see anything, sorry.

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XenoFish
40 minutes ago, danydandan said:

I don't see anything, sorry.

I do. However I'm cautious. Might be pareidolia.

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Lilly

Contact your nearest university, they may send someone out to look at these markings. A trained archaeologist could most likely tell you what's what there. 

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Not A Rockstar

That is a really lovely find, but hard to make details out. Sorry.

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freetoroam
54 minutes ago, Brittanyvt said:

Approximately 2 miles from a road or trail, we stumbled upon a tucked away wall of petroglyphs in the Valley of Fire, NV.  Because of upload size limitations, this is only a screenshot from a short mp4.  One petroglyph seems to depict a shonisaurus.  Any ideas what the others depict?

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1E14U6o4_WbNaZ68HX7Fx2UNMR_3-Lu6R/view?usp=drivesdk

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1utrhuZ2v28FLCNs5qXPontxFBKXI_yOi/view?usp=drivesdk

rsz_20180520_111925.jpg

There is no comparison. 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcT4NWznlTrSQQmsQYsG0x3

You can often see what could be seen as strange  markings on rocks...it could be water marks, fossils, sedimentary marks. But although there can be some very intriging marks, there is a difference between them.and petroglyphs.

As advised...get an trained archaeologist to have a look.and maybe they can tell you what made the marks. 

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Tatetopa

Long time no sea, all dry land.

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Tatetopa

People have been pecking at stones for a long time.  Not all are artists.  Some are just people recounting an event in their lives.  There are a lot of those small sites in Oregon too. Looks like paw prints in a trail going up on the right .  As advised, consult an expert.  What looks to you like a shonisaurus  could more mundanely be a large chuckwalla lizard doing a head bobbing territorial; display.  It is a good find.  Maybe you can have some empathy for the person that put them there.  You can imagine what his life was like, maybe it will get you interested in reading more on the subject.

 

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Piney
2 hours ago, Brittanyvt said:

One petroglyph seems to depict a shonisaurus.  Any ideas what the others depict?

One of the many depictions of a lizard found in the area.

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Guyver

I do see the petroglyphs, but can't tell you what we're looking at.  People, trees, snake?  The snake seems part of the sandstone....so....idk.  

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khol
Posted (edited)

Very nice find. The little I've read looks like they may be Anasazi ? which would date them pre Columbian  Im sure youve checked all that out

 

Edited by khol
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Piney
32 minutes ago, khol said:

Very nice find. The little I've read looks like they may be Anasazi ? which would date them pre Columbian  Im sure youve checked all that out

 

I was just going to say that. I see a Anasazi Kachina. 

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Piney
Posted (edited)
48 minutes ago, Guyver said:

I do see the petroglyphs, but can't tell you what we're looking at.  People, trees, snake?  The snake seems part of the sandstone....so....idk.  

The wiggly line just below the Kachina is a river. It looks like a "rain charm" etched on the rock. 

Edited by Piney
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Stiff

I can see Laurel. And I think, Yanni.

Seriously, I can definitely make out things in there that look man made.

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Kenemet
4 hours ago, Brittanyvt said:

Approximately 2 miles from a road or trail, we stumbled upon a tucked away wall of petroglyphs in the Valley of Fire, NV.  Because of upload size limitations, this is only a screenshot from a short mp4.  One petroglyph seems to depict a shonisaurus.  Any ideas what the others depict?

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1E14U6o4_WbNaZ68HX7Fx2UNMR_3-Lu6R/view?usp=drivesdk

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1utrhuZ2v28FLCNs5qXPontxFBKXI_yOi/view?usp=drivesdk

rsz_20180520_111925.jpg

Beautiful, and yes, I see them.  Check the NRAF website to see if this is a known location.  If not, give the approximate location (with some directions) so they can be cataloged and noted for preservation: http://www.nvrockart.org/

These are actually fairly old.

 

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Not A Rockstar

So @Tatetopa and @Piney it was common for early peoples to "jot" down experiences on rocks? It was not always ceremonial and this may have been just a small team of hunters writing out their hopes for a good hunt? This is interesting.

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Piney
8 minutes ago, Not A Rockstar said:

So @Tatetopa and @Piney it was common for early peoples to "jot" down experiences on rocks? It was not always ceremonial and this may have been just a small team of hunters writing out their hopes for a good hunt? This is interesting.

From the Kachina, Lizard and river I would say it was a "rain charm". Like a Veve for rain.

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Piney
32 minutes ago, Kenemet said:

Beautiful, and yes, I see them.  Check the NRAF website to see if this is a known location.  If not, give the approximate location (with some directions) so they can be cataloged and noted for preservation: http://www.nvrockart.org/

These are actually fairly old.

 

If you have seen the sites that the BLM allows mining and drilling companys destroy, you would be sick to your stomach. Another erasure of the American genocide to add to the "untamed wilderness" myth.

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Not A Rockstar
6 minutes ago, Piney said:

If you have seen the sites that the BLM allows mining and drilling companys destroy, you would be sick to your stomach. Another erasure of the American genocide to add to the "untamed wilderness" myth.

Sadly I see this warfare in the world out there and in the minds trying to kill off the past as well and deny where we have been. 

Agendas, served by so many who do not even realize what they serve :( . Anyway, this is really a sweet find to me. I would love a copy on my wall here, being into rain especially.

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Carnoferox
10 hours ago, Brittanyvt said:

One petroglyph seems to depict a shonisaurus.

Not sure where you see a Shonisaurus there.

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kmt_sesh

I'm not convinced they're anything, but others gave very good advice about contact archaeological authorities (at a nearby university, for instance). On the off chance they're legit, they need to be registered and protected.

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Tatetopa
7 hours ago, Not A Rockstar said:

So @Tatetopa and @Piney it was common for early peoples to "jot" down experiences on rocks? It was not always ceremonial and this may have been just a small team of hunters writing out their hopes for a good hunt? This is interesting.

Thanks Rockstar, you are too kind. Don't put me in a class with Piney.  I am a piker by comparison.  I know what a few friends have told me and read a little.  Piney has studied the subject and he has a passion.  The best thing I could do is follow him around and hope to learn something.  

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Tatetopa
7 hours ago, Not A Rockstar said:

Sadly I see this warfare in the world out there and in the minds trying to kill off the past as well and deny where we have been. 

You know Rockstar, your own region has a rich history.  I think the Poverty Point complex stems from about 700 BCE.    Maybe you can visit while it is still there.  The South was alive with cities and cultures and trade long before Columbus.  Rivers and trails went for hundreds of miles.  To the south, the gulf and the Caribbean islands were alive with seaborne trade. Some of the traces still exist, but I encourage you to visit what you can now..

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Timonthy

Welcome to UM @Brittanyvt,

Certainly looks interesting to me, but I have pretty much zero professional knowledge on the subject. 

I’d follow others advice to check if what you’ve found is known, or not, and to have it examined and catalogued.

Can you please keep us updated on what happens? Or possibly provide a more accurate location so that the knowledgeable ones here can add a few more cents.

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Not A Rockstar
10 minutes ago, Tatetopa said:

You know Rockstar, your own region has a rich history.  I think the Poverty Point complex stems from about 700 BCE.    Maybe you can visit while it is still there.  The South was alive with cities and cultures and trade long before Columbus.  Rivers and trails went for hundreds of miles.  To the south, the gulf and the Caribbean islands were alive with seaborne trade. Some of the traces still exist, but I encourage you to visit what you can now..

Yes, I was thrilled when Poverty Point became a World Heritage site. A lot remains but it is in plain sight and most do not know the history behind it, it is just that road or this field. I plan to go back to Poverty Point this Fall when it cools down again. 

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