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Giant predatory worms have invaded France

16 posts in this topic

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Orphalesion
Posted (edited)

Are those things dangerous to humans, like parasitic? Or are they just "predatory" in the sense that they eat insects and dangerous in that they can have a negative environmental impact?

Edited by Orphalesion

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GiganticManchild

I read in another article that these "hammerhead" worms hunt and eat common earthworms which in turn throws off the balance.

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Sundew

France? Invaded? That's just not possible.

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eddword

This thing looks like some kind of creature from the Alien Prometheus

movie. The one that got inside one of the  astronau'ts space suit .

 

5b04a3c1c4c7e_prometheuscreature.jpg.0aae52ca2d1b708af91c6d19d3875148.jpg

 

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Jon the frog

Creepy worms, lots of these unseen critters are surprising !

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ChaosRose

I was picturing Dune or Tremors.

And then the thing was 40 lousy cm long. 

Pfffft.

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Tom the Photon
Posted (edited)

I'm sure the French will come up with a recipe for them.  "Ver plat à l'ail, monsieur?"

Edited by Tom the Photon
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UFOwatcher
Posted (edited)

For those interested, 40 CM = 15.7480314961 inches. So what has changed in France?

Edited by UFOwatcher

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TonopahRick

Hmmm...They might make good fish bait as long as they don't bite when you put them on a hook.

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paperdyer
Posted (edited)

If frogs will eat these, the French should put a moratorium on eating Kermit for a while and release the frogs!  There has to be something that will eat the flat worms. Larger birds maybe?

Edited by paperdyer
Corrected my fat finger typing

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WolfHawk

This is what I don't get:

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Matt221
On 23/05/2018 at 4:27 PM, TonopahRick said:

Hmmm...They might make good fish bait as long as they don't bite when you put them on a hook.

That's why I'm not a big fan of ragworm you pick them up to hook them and the cheeky little buggas nip you for your troubles

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DanteHoratio
Posted (edited)

There is alot of animals who have invaded where they are not meant to, such as Cane Toads, Red Foxes, or Wild Boar.

 

On 5/25/2018 at 1:29 AM, WolfHawk said:

This is what I don't get:

What don't you get?

Edited by DanteHoratio

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oldrover
On 25/05/2018 at 2:13 PM, Matt221 said:

That's why I'm not a big fan of ragworm you pick them up to hook them and the cheeky little buggas nip you for your troubles

Better than those giant exploding lug though.

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WolfHawk
On 5/28/2018 at 9:05 AM, DanteHoratio said:

There is alot of animals who have invaded where they are not meant to, such as Cane Toads, Red Foxes, or Wild Boar.

 

What don't you get?

Wow, almost my whole comment is gone!  What I don't get is why living in a developed country should have an affect on worms invading gardens?

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