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Still Waters

Canberra man falls victim to the Uluru curse

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Black Monk
On 27/06/2018 at 9:29 PM, DingoLingo said:

Australians *grins* like I said..

Rubbish.

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it has not been called Ayers Rock since the 90's..

Codswallop.

Quote

it is call Uluru..

It's also called Ayers Rock. That's its name.

 

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Black Monk
On 28/06/2018 at 3:23 AM, ChrLzs said:

 virtually everyone in Oz refers to it as Uluru.

How do you know this?

Quote

That's even though Henry Ayer has absolutely no connection whatsoever to the rock or the region. 

Apart from the fact that he was Governor of South Australia at a time when Ayers Rock was in South Australia.

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Still Waters

Oh for goodness sake, all this nit-picking over a name!

Ayers Rock, Uluru, it doesn't matter which name it goes by. Enough please.

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DingoLingo
9 hours ago, Black Monk said:

Rubbish.

Codswallop.

It's also called Ayers Rock. That's its name.

 

well me and Chrlz know it because .. well.. we are australian *laughing* your talking about our country mate.. I'm a born and bred west aussie

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Vlad the Mighty
Posted (edited)
On 28/06/2018 at 3:23 AM, ChrLzs said:

That's even though Henry Ayer, the guy whose name it was given by a gov't surveyor back in the 1950's, has absolutely no connection whatsoever to the rock or the region.  Back in that era, indigenous owners were rudely ignored.

I see you corrected yourself, so I withdraw the pedantry 

Edited by Vlad the Mighty

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DerDesertRat

I have a piece of Uluru, Hawaiian Volcanoes, Rock of Gibraltar, AND a piece of the Great Pyramid in my rock garden. Also have numerous burial/grave goods from North American first nations sites on private property or from prior to the archaeological act passed in the 70's. And I have fantastic luck. No kidding. I constantly get comments about it. How did yiu get tickets to the sold out show, how many royal flushes can one person possibly draw? How many near miss Chupacabra/Sasquatch attcks.have you survived (probably dozens - but I didn't even know it). Near misses in shootouts I could go on and on. Its not the rocks dude. Its the dude that rocks.

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openozy
4 minutes ago, DerDesertRat said:

I have a piece of Uluru, Hawaiian Volcanoes, Rock of Gibraltar, AND a piece of the Great Pyramid in my rock garden. Also have numerous burial/grave goods from North American first nations sites on private property or from prior to the archaeological act passed in the 70's. And I have fantastic luck. No kidding. I constantly get comments about it. How did yiu get tickets to the sold out show, how many royal flushes can one person possibly draw? How many near miss Chupacabra/Sasquatch attcks.have you survived (probably dozens - but I didn't even know it). Near misses in shootouts I could go on and on. Its not the rocks dude. Its the dude that rocks.

You won't be having good luck if the aboriginals find out you have a chunk of Uluru.

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Piney
11 hours ago, DerDesertRat said:

Also have numerous burial/grave goods from North American first nations sites on private property or from prior to the archaeological act passed in the 70's.

:mellow: You sound like a person who is full of respect for indigenous cultures.........

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moonman
17 hours ago, DerDesertRat said:

I have a piece of Uluru, Hawaiian Volcanoes, Rock of Gibraltar, AND a piece of the Great Pyramid in my rock garden. Also have numerous burial/grave goods from North American first nations sites on private property or from prior to the archaeological act passed in the 70's. And I have fantastic luck. No kidding. I constantly get comments about it. How did yiu get tickets to the sold out show, how many royal flushes can one person possibly draw? How many near miss Chupacabra/Sasquatch attcks.have you survived (probably dozens - but I didn't even know it). Near misses in shootouts I could go on and on. Its not the rocks dude. Its the dude that rocks.

Not sure if serious...

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Black Red Devil

His problems started way before visiting Uluru.  Living in Canberra is enough of a curse.  Too cold, too many politicians and not enough ocean. :P

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Mr Walker
On 27/05/2018 at 8:25 PM, XenoFish said:

Those who are more spiritual and/or religious are more susceptible to the idea of being "cursed". Which is nothing more than a self-induced nocebo effect. 

 https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/think-well/201803/how-stop-self-fulfilling-prophecies-failure

https://www.aconsciousrethink.com/6134/self-fulfilling-prophecy-law-of-attraction/

It's all in our heads.

Of course, to a great extent, EVERYTHING is just in our heads,  because  humans are mind more than body. 

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Mr Walker

Uluru/ Ayres rock are both official names for the rock. It was the first landmark given official dual names in Dec 1993, from memory.

What an Australian calls it is up to their own sense of political correctness, although there has been some govt and community consensus to call it Uluru. as a cultural  recognition of its importance to our native peoples.

It still ignites passions, especially with new moves to ban climbing on it.

  I climbed it early  one morning back in 1973, before any controversy arose. It was Jan and the temps during the day were in the 40s  C  so we set off early, a t dawn. Even so the rock was too hot to touch by the time we got back down.  Then we had 4 inches of rain on the rock and it was one of the most beautiful experiences in my life, to see it change colour from red to silver, and all the water holes fill with fresh water.  Back then you could camp at the base of it, and to wake up and come out of your tent, and look up, and up, and up,  at the rock,  was a spiritual experience in itself.     

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