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Article 13, link tax and the end of fair use


Saru
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When something like this was tried in Germany - at the bequest of the major News publishers - it was a disaster for them. They rapidly backed down because - without Google - traffic to their OWN news websites dropped dramatically. 

A similar story applies to Spain. 

I really don't think the EU is going to do this. 

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I think they are. George Soros was exposed by Wikileaks talking about how they have to shut down the flow of information and make the internet like cable TV. 

This has to be stopped. 

Edited by preacherman76
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Posted (IP: Staff) ·

It's not looking good so far:

Quote

'Disastrous' copyright bill vote approved

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-44546620

Next step:

Quote

It will now go to the wider European Parliament to vote on in July.

 

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Posted (IP: Staff) ·

From the above link:

Quote

A committee of MEPs has voted to accept major changes to European copyright law, which experts say could change the nature of the internet.

The European Parliament's Committee on Legal Affairs voted by 15 votes to 10 to adopt Article 13 and by 13 votes to 12 to adopt Article 11.

*sigh* what a surprise...

Unsurprisingly, the news hasn't gone down too well.

At least it's not through quite yet though, as mentioned it looks like there's another vote before it will become law.

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3 hours ago, Saru said:

From the above link:

*sigh* what a surprise...

Unsurprisingly, the news hasn't gone down too well.

At least it's not through quite yet though, as mentioned it looks like there's another vote before it will become law.

Would I be right Saru in thinking that this Law can be overturned when the UK leaves the EU considering that this is EU Legislation?

 

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Posted (IP: Staff) ·
24 minutes ago, keithisco said:

Would I be right Saru in thinking that this Law can be overturned when the UK leaves the EU considering that this is EU Legislation?

Websites in all countries will need to comply with this law when linking to or quoting content from European websites.

When the UK leaves the EU though (which will be before this law comes in to effect) it will hopefully mean that it won't apply when linking to UK sites.

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Well this is getting interesting...

 

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Hopefully this will be voted down at the next stage, but then again this is the EU who loves bureaucracy and over burdening regulation.-  but what do we expect from a organisation that as 4,232 rules on toothpaste alone, but on this link tax, it might be a long process if its passed anyway as it took the EU 4 years to agree on the definition of what Chocolate is. :o but i guess its all for our own good comrades.

Edited by stevewinn
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  • 2 weeks later...
Posted (IP: Staff) ·

So the next vote is actually in two days' time on July 5th.

Wikipedia has put up a large banner about it:

Quote

This Tuesday we need your help. On 5 July 2018, the European Parliament will vote on a new copyright directive. If approved, these changes threaten to disrupt the open Internet that Wikipedia is a part of. You have time to act. Join the discussion. Thank you.

https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/EU_policy/2018_European_Parliament_vote

Among other things, it writes:

Quote

We believe that:

  • The requirement for platforms to implement upload filters is a serious threat for freedom of expression and privacy. Our foundational vision depends on the free exchange of knowledge across the entirety of the web, and beyond the boundaries of the Wikimedia projects.
  • A new exclusive right allowing press publishers to restrict the use of news snippets will make it more difficult to access and share information about current events in the world, making it harder for Wikipedia contributors to find citations for articles online.
  • The proposal does not support user rights, is missing strong safeguards for the public domain, and does not create exceptions that would truly empower people to participate in research and culture.
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So basically the EU only.cares about it self and not the public?

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Posted (IP: Staff) ·
On 03/07/2018 at 12:14 PM, Mr.United_Nations said:

So basically the EU only.cares about it self and not the public?

Personally, I think politicians have been pressured in to voting for this by big businesses who will benefit financially from the move.

Unlike GDPR which sought to protect users' data, this new copyright legislation is detrimental, rather than beneficial, to users in general.

It also favors large businesses and sites (especially news sites in the EU), at the expense of smaller sites (like UM).

Some more coverage today - looks like Wikipedia Italy has closed its doors temporarily in protest:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-44696302

http://www.iflscience.com/technology/the-eu-is-about-to-decide-the-fate-of-the-internet-and-it-affects-us-all/

I guess we'll have to see what happens tomorrow.

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Posted (IP: Staff) ·

Success! (for now at least)

Quote

MEPs reject controversial copyright law

MEPs have voted to reject a controversial copyright law in its current form, deciding to return to the issue in September.

Julia Reda, a Pirate Party MEP who had campaigned against the legislation tweeted: "Great success: Your protests have worked! The European Parliament has sent the copyright law back to the drawing board."

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-44712475

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Its good news for the moment but it goes back to the legislators in September for a rethink.

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Woohoo. I'd say Wikipedia played a big part in this.

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  • 6 months later...

Articles 11 and 13 have both been rejected by EU Council. 

No links I just seen it on the TV.

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5 minutes ago, danydandan said:

Articles 11 and 13 have both been rejected by EU Council. 

No links I just seen it on the TV.

Sorry I'm alittle late to the party lol

So is it defeated now ? I thought it already passed ?

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5 minutes ago, spartan max2 said:

Sorry I'm alittle late to the party lol

So is it defeated now ? I thought it already passed ?

no not passed! they are thinking of bringing in the SSAS

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3 hours ago, Dejarma said:

no not passed! they are thinking of bringing in the SSAS

Were thinking. Not anymore.

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Posted (IP: Staff) ·

Here's a link:

https://www.theverge.com/2019/1/18/18188571/europe-copyright-directive-link-tax-article-11-13

This is really good news, it looks like 11 EU member states rejected the proposals.

The EU has until the end of next month to make amendments, however it will need to please everyone before progress can be made.

So we're not totally out of the woods, but it's a major step towards ditching articles 11 and 13 for good.

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6 minutes ago, Saru said:

Here's a link:

https://www.theverge.com/2019/1/18/18188571/europe-copyright-directive-link-tax-article-11-13

This is really good news, it looks like 11 EU member states rejected the proposals.

The EU has until the end of next month to make amendments, however it will need to please everyone before progress can be made.

So we're not totally out of the woods, but it's a major step towards ditching articles 11 and 13 for good.

After March 29th would this ruling or any EU ruling apply to this forum.

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Posted (IP: Staff) ·
9 minutes ago, stevewinn said:

After March 29th would this ruling or any EU ruling apply to this forum.

EU Internet laws are applicable in all countries - they are about how you do business with EU countries, regardless of whether your country is in the EU.

They even apply in the US, which is why after GDPR so many US sites have blocked access to EU (and UK) visitors entirely.

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12 minutes ago, Saru said:

Here's a link:

https://www.theverge.com/2019/1/18/18188571/europe-copyright-directive-link-tax-article-11-13

This is really good news, it looks like 11 EU member states rejected the proposals.

The EU has until the end of next month to make amendments, however it will need to please everyone before progress can be made.

So we're not totally out of the woods, but it's a major step towards ditching articles 11 and 13 for good.

Excellent news ! 

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19 minutes ago, Saru said:

EU Internet laws are applicable in all countries - they are about how you do business with EU countries, regardless of whether your country is in the EU.

They even apply in the US, which is why after GDPR so many US sites have blocked access to EU (and UK) visitors entirely.

bloody EU.

If the EU passed Article 11 & 13. what would be the solution for this forum. block access to EU citizens?

 

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5 minutes ago, stevewinn said:

bloody EU.

If the EU passed Article 11 & 13. what would be the solution for this forum. block access to EU citizens?

 

Well, anyone linking to a story on - say - the Guardian website could result in Saruman being sued by the Guardian ? 

In essence, the forum would have to ban external linkage. 

We would have to link EVERY discussion to Wikipedia :D

Oh wait.. Wikipedia would possibly have to be taken down :o 

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Posted (IP: Staff) ·
10 minutes ago, stevewinn said:

bloody EU.

If the EU passed Article 11 & 13. what would be the solution for this forum. block access to EU citizens?

Articles 11 and 13 in their proposed forms would put countless thousands of sites, businesses and content creators out of business.

All Internet forums and social media sites would have to implement complex, draconian content filtering mechanisms - however as things stand there's no practical way to pre-emptively determine if any given piece of text is copyrighted at the time of posting.

This is the biggest problem with it really - it's not just overly restrictive, it's literally impossible for sites to fully comply.

This would make forums and other sites with user-generated content unworkable in the vast majority of cases.

Sites that can't find or afford a solution will simply disappear.

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