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Waspie_Dwarf

Huge Dust Storm Hits Opportunity Mars Rover

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Merc14
10 hours ago, pallidin said:

Are you serious?

Space probes forever have had a dual power supply. RTG's and solar.

I'm not going to do the research for you, as this is common space probe science.

Happy Googling.

I did my "happy googling" and came up empty.  Waspie checked in and backs this up, zero operational craft with both solar and RTG power sources except for test beds.  Couldn't find a single dual powered craft, space borne or rover so I am calling BS on your "common space probe science" (highlighting is your's) and can only guess at why you would make this claim when it is so easily disproved.

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Waspie_Dwarf
8 hours ago, Merc14 said:

Do the Russians or some other country have any such craft? 

 

I know the Russians have nuclear powered satellites but I don't think that they use RTGs. They have never sent a spacecraft beyond Mars orbit and I believe all their deep space probes have been solar powered.

I don't know of anyone other than the USA using RTGs. Something in the back of my mind says that ESA used an RTG but it was supplied by NASA. Currently on the bus home so I will have to look into that later.

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Waspie_Dwarf
Quote

 

NASA Mars Exploration Rover Status Report

Updated at 1:20 p.m. PDT on June 20, 2018

As of Tuesday morning, June 19, the Martian dust storm had grown in size and was officially a "planet-encircling" (or "global") dust event. The storm has starkly increased dust at Gale Crater, where NASA's Curiosity rover is studying the storm's effects from the surface.

There still was no signal received from NASA's Opportunity rover, despite efforts to listen in case it's coming out of sleep during its fault window -- the period of time when it attempts to communicate. A recent analysis of the rover’s long-term survivability in Mars’ extreme cold suggests Opportunity’s electronics and batteries can stay warm enough to function. Regardless, the project doesn’t expect to hear back from Opportunity until the skies begin to clear over the rover. That doesn’t stop them from listening for the rover every day.

arrow3.gif  Read More: NASA/JPL

 

 

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Waspie_Dwarf

Martian Dust Storm Grows Global: Curiosity Captures Photos of Thickening Haze

Quote

A storm of tiny dust particles has engulfed much of Mars over the last two weeks and prompted NASA’s Opportunity rover to suspend science operations. But across the planet, NASA’s Curiosity rover, which has been studying Martian soil at Gale Crater, is expected to remain largely unaffected by the dust. While Opportunity is powered by sunlight, which is blotted out by dust at its current location, Curiosity has a nuclear-powered battery that runs day and night.

The Martian dust storm has grown in size and is now officially a "planet-encircling" (or "global") dust event, according to Bruce Cantor, deputy principal investigator of the Mars Color Imager camera onboard NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Malin Space Science Systems, San Diego, provided and operates MARCI.

arrow3.gif  Read More: NASA

 

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cyclopes500

People talk about fans blowing the dust off the panels. Isn't the Mars atmosphere a bit too thin for that. I would have thought a can of compressed Mars air would be better.

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Merc14
2 hours ago, cyclopes500 said:

People talk about fans blowing the dust off the panels. Isn't the Mars atmosphere a bit too thin for that. I would have thought a can of compressed Mars air would be better.

Wind has been blowing dust off the panels for years now, that is a fact unless a team of martians is doing it.  Likely the little dust devil storms that pop up all over the surface

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MWoo7

Now its a full on Global Dust Storm eh?!?!?

17b95bf4ba430baf8cb087a0d592555b.jpg

.

.

132100c0427b8b53efbc2035e72abfe6--the-ma

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qxcontinuum

So a planet who lost its entire atmosphere is not engolfed in a planetary storm? How so?

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qxcontinuum
5 hours ago, qxcontinuum said:

So a planet who lost its entire atmosphere is not engolfed in a planetary storm? How so?

Correction; is now* engolfed .

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toast
Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, qxcontinuum said:

Correction; is now* engolfed .

12 hours ago, qxcontinuum said:

So a planet who lost its entire atmosphere is not engolfed in a planetary storm? How so?

As well known already, you are clueless on the matter. Mars didn't "lost its entire atmosphere" (yet).

Edited by toast
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bison
15 hours ago, qxcontinuum said:

So a planet who lost its entire atmosphere is not engolfed in a planetary storm? How so?

Mars' atmosphere has about 6/1000th the pressure of Earth's. Remarkably, this is sufficient to sustain planet-wide dust storms. There are also whirlwinds, fog, clouds of crystalline water ice and frozen carbon dioxide, jet streams, and aurorae.     

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Merc14
19 hours ago, qxcontinuum said:

So a planet who lost its entire atmosphere is not engolfed in a planetary storm? How so?

Couldn't you have simply google Mars atmosphere before posting this?  It's like posting that you are proud to be completely ignorant on a subject.   BTW, you corrected your misspelling by posting the same wrong spelling again.   :rolleyes:

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Waspie_Dwarf
1 hour ago, Merc14 said:

BTW, you corrected your misspelling by posting the same wrong spelling again.   :rolleyes:

It wasn't engulfed he corrected, it was "not" to "now".

English is not his first language so the spelling mistakes are forgivable. Constantly posting information which is provably false is not.

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Merc14
41 minutes ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

It wasn't engulfed he corrected, it was "not" to "now".

English is not his first language so the spelling mistakes are forgivable. Constantly posting information which is provably false is not.

LOL, I completely missed that as my eye went  to the more obvious, my bad.  I apologize  qx as I normally wouldn't correct spelling  except I thought...never mind, I apologize.  The rest of my comment stands qx. 

 

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Occams Razor

Even if a fan/blower had been included there wouldn't be enough sunlight reaching the panels through all the dust blowing around in the dust storm... it will be miles thick.

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cyclopes500

If I had a billion quid to spend I'd like to send a tracked nuclear powered rover to the Marsian poles to look at the ice.

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Merc14
13 minutes ago, cyclopes500 said:

If I had a billion quid to spend I'd like to send a tracked nuclear powered rover to the Marsian poles to look at the ice.

I don't think it is because of money, it is a because of the 1967 outer space treaty which forbids everyone from sending a robot or human anywhere near a possible water source for fear of contaminating it.  Right now it is nearly impossible to completely sterilize any device we send to Mars due to the inherent resilience of terrestrial microbes and until we can resolve that problem we are forced to analyze from a distance.

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