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Ozymandias

The Great Pyramid (G1)

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Gaden
2 hours ago, Tom the Photon said:

I forgot about that massif.  Certainly would have created an apparently-insurmountable problem.  Perhaps they couldn't check the diagonals, which created the small irregularities in the lengths of the sides?  That makes them sound more human and fallible.  So why didn't the Grey Masters step in then with GPS and alien technology to ensure precision?

I'm strangely pleased to hear your first comment - "You ask a lot of questions that simply can not be answered."  I wish it were otherwise, and we could prove that our human ancestors were smart and adaptable enough to overcome these difficulties without resorting to external intelligence and technology.  That's certainly my belief, but until it's proven it leaves room for all sorts of obscure theories.  Equally a very small part of me hopes there is proof of alien intervention, and thus the possibility they might revisit us soon with cures for cancer, global warming, cold sores (a personal bugbear), corruption in office, nuclear weapons, etc.; and all the other things that aren't so serious but really annoy me, like when there's not enough fruit in the strawberry crunch cereal, or Ahatmose.

 

  There is plenty of evidence that the AE built the pyramids and absolutely none that ET was involved. In the first place, there is no evidence that they even exist, let alone the opinion (mine) that they would have built a more precise structure. And why would there be worker's cemeteries on site? 

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kmt_sesh
2 hours ago, Gaden said:

  There is plenty of evidence that the AE built the pyramids and absolutely none that ET was involved. In the first place, there is no evidence that they even exist, let alone the opinion (mine) that they would have built a more precise structure. And why would there be worker's cemeteries on site? 

Indeed. Aliens are a modern myth, and an extremely unfortunate one at that.

There is a workers' cemetery at Giza and it has yielded numerous graves and tombs. The interments seem to have been for more of the upper-echelon, such as foreman and administrators. One can imge the honor it would've been to be buried near the site of the king's tomb.

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jaylemurph
21 minutes ago, kmt_sesh said:

Indeed. Aliens are a modern myth, and an extremely unfortunate one at that.

There is a workers' cemetery at Giza and it has yielded numerous graves and tombs. The interments seem to have been for more of the upper-echelon, such as foreman and administrators. One can imge the honor it would've been to be buried near the site of the king's tomb.

I thought it might be punishment. You know, "You shall have ever before your eyes your failure to please Our Masters with your oddly triangular ham effigies."

--Jaylemurph

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danydandan
9 hours ago, Advenix said:

Most of the replies is a case of unbelievable failure to stick to the the concept of selecting a unique item among others.  

So once again: Despite such confusion, A = 440 Hz is the only official standard and is widely used around the world. Many orchestras in the United Kingdom adhere to this standard as concert pitch. In the United States some orchestras use A = 440 Hz, while others, such as the New York Philharmonic, use A = 442 Hz. The latter is also often used as a tuning frequency in Europe, especially in Denmark, France, Hungary, Italy, Norway and Switzerland.[18] Nearly all modern symphony orchestras in Germany and Austria and many in other countries in continental Europe (such as Russia, Sweden and Spain) tune to A = 443 Hz. The Boston Symphony Orchestra tunes to A = 441 Hz.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Concert_pitch

There is a reason behind the scientists using standardized units of measurement, where, for example, the meter is the standard unit of length....

It isn't unique that's the point, if there were only one way to tune to A in one pitch it would be unique. As I and the other poster have pointed out there are numerous ways to tune instruments to a number of different pitchs in a number of different keys that all have A.

You can argue that it's unique because it's the only way to achieve that frequency.

Despite that,.. the pyramid isn't exactly 440.00cubits, however the key your talking about is absolutely 440.0000000hz thus the initial connection is irrelevant. I have seen someone measure the base with GPS and the measurements for the base is actually 439.8 some say it's over 440.00 considering it ain't exactly 440 your point is moot. I'd be suitably impress if the measurements were exactly 440.00 but we know they aren't. And that 440 cubits depends on what measurement you use for a cubit.

Edited by danydandan
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Ozymandias
17 hours ago, Gaden said:

 You ask a lot of questions that simply can not be answered. Speculation abounds, but there is simply not enough information to draw conclusions. Checking their work by measuring the diagonals would have been particularly problematic, as the site was not leveled, a large massif was included in the design. Exactly how big ( which is why I question the amount of blocks popularly estimated) or whether to decrease the amount of blocks needed and or to provide stability for the core is more speculation.

Yes, this rock outcrop would have made it impossible for them to directly measure and check the length of the diagonals of the base of the pyramid.

Those wishing to explore the mathematics of the Great Pyramid - and indirectly, the inferred mathematical abilities of the Ancient Greeks - may find this link interesting and informative. It comes from a course on Geometry in Art & Architecture from Dartmouth College. Some basic maths is needed.

https://www.dartmouth.edu/~matc/math5.geometry/unit2/unit2.html 

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Advenix
15 hours ago, danydandan said:

It isn't unique that's the point, if there were only one way to tune to A in one pitch it would be unique. As I and the other poster have pointed out there are numerous ways to tune instruments to a number of different pitchs in a number of different keys that all have A.

You can argue that it's unique because it's the only way to achieve that frequency.

Despite that,.. the pyramid isn't exactly 440.00cubits, however the key your talking about is absolutely 440.0000000hz thus the initial connection is irrelevant. I have seen someone measure the base with GPS and the measurements for the base is actually 439.8 some say it's over 440.00 considering it ain't exactly 440 your point is moot. I'd be suitably impress if the measurements were exactly 440.00 but we know they aren't. And that 440 cubits depends on what measurement you use for a cubit.

You don't exactly understand how to apply the definition of unique, which means being the only one of its kind.
It means there exists a description of such an item according to which only that particular item is selected.

Here is a list of all decimal digits:

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Which one of them is unique and why? Can you manage the answer?

Your idea that "if there were only one way to tune to A in one pitch it would be unique" excludes other options to recognize its uniqueness.

You can compare the frequency value of the standard pitch to the traffic signs limiting the speed. Not every driver abide by it though. The same goes for a variety of symphony orchestras, which are in this case - and obviously so - not enforced to follow the ISO decision regarding the 440 Hz pitch - a pitch that is the only one having the word STANDARD attach to it. Since it is the only one, the 440 Hz pitch is unique in this respect.

Here is once again how the 440 Hz achieved its unique pitch status:

The International Organization for Standardization classifies it as ISO 16. Before standardization on 440 Hz, other frequencies were standardized upon. Although not universally accepted, it serves as the audio frequency reference to calibrate acoustic equipment and to tune pianos, violins, and other musical instruments.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A440_(pitch_standard)

Btw, this is amazing: I included in my post an excerpt from a Wikipedia article which explicitly mentions that there are symphony orchestra that do not tune according to the international standard 440 Hz, just to see you reminding me of some poster who said the same.  

As far the measurements are concerned, you again ignored the rounding of measured values up to the integers, which is a commonly used process to reference and organize data for a comprehensive comparison.

 The Egyptians didn't decide on having the base 439.874301 cubits nor 440.2376 cubits long; they considered whole numbers - 440 and also 280 for the height of the pyramid where both numbers end with zero, which in turn speak of the fact that they used decimal system. In other words, the result doesn't always speak for the intention. 

Why do you think the distance between cities is given for common purposes as a whole number (miles or km)? That's because the exact distance cannot be easily determined - the precise ending points of the distance line are difficult to define. Moreover,  the minute differences are not of any particular value to an ordinary traveler.

Edited by Advenix
typo

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Golden Duck
5 hours ago, Advenix said:

You don't exactly understand how to apply the definition of unique, which means being the only one of its kind.
It means there exists a description of such an item according to which only that particular item is selected.

Here is a list of all decimal digits:

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Which one of them is unique and why? Can you manage the answer?

Your idea that "if there were only one way to tune to A in one pitch it would be unique" excludes other options to recognize its uniqueness.

You can compare the frequency value of the standard pitch to the traffic signs limiting the speed. Not every driver abide by it though. The same goes for a variety of symphony orchestras, which are in this case - and obviously so - not enforced to follow the ISO decision regarding the 440 Hz pitch - a pitch that is the only one having the word STANDARD attach to it. Since it is the only one, the 440 Hz pitch is unique in this respect.

Here is once again how the 440 Hz achieved its unique pitch status:

The International Organization for Standardization classifies it as ISO 16. Before standardization on 440 Hz, other frequencies were standardized upon. Although not universally accepted, it serves as the audio frequency reference to calibrate acoustic equipment and to tune pianos, violins, and other musical instruments.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A440_(pitch_standard)

Btw, this is amazing: I included in my post an excerpt from a Wikipedia article which explicitly mentions that there are symphony orchestra that do not tune according to the international standard 440 Hz, just to see you reminding me of some poster who said the same.  

As far the measurements are concerned, you again ignored the rounding of measured values up to the integers, which is a commonly used process to reference and organize data for a comprehensive comparison.

 The Egyptians didn't decide on having the base 439.874301 cubits nor 440.2376 cubits long; they considered whole numbers - 440 and also 280 for the height of the pyramid where both numbers end with zero, which in turn speak of the fact that they used decimal system. In other words, the result doesn't always speak for the intention. 

Why do you think the distance between cities is given for common purposes as a whole number (miles or km)? That's because the exact distance cannot be easily determined - the precise ending points of the distance line are difficult to define. Moreover,  the minute differences are not of any particular value to an ordinary traveler.

So ISO 19:1975 exists; and it may or may not be used.  To be compliant, with the standard, requires accuracy to half a half a Hertz.  So it seems you've got the accuracy covered.

But, ISO16:1975 refers to the A in the treble stave - the diatonic scale.  Did they use the diatonic scale?

And how did they measure cycles per second?

Why does 440 have to relate to frequency and not to a Chrysler motor or the length of an athletics track?

Edited by Golden Duck
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Golden Duck
On 16/06/2018 at 2:44 PM, jaylemurph said:

I took it to be the theme from Close Encounters of the Third Kind. I don't parse crazy, though, so it's totally debatable.

--Jaylemurph

That was re mi do do so; or D E C C G.

I thought there might be a more apt melody for Zoser's Encounters of the Absurd Kind 

There's a saying about having to explain a joke...

I'll show myself out. 

Edited by Golden Duck
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