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pavel popelskii

Stalin's mysterious artifacts in ruins.

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pavel popelskii
Posted (edited)
  • Interesting historical news from the Russian Far East. 
    On the Amur River, unique Stalin artifacts of the forties disappear. 
    They are overgrown witInteresting historical news from the Russian Far East. 
    On the Amur River, unique Stalin artifacts of the forties disappear. 
    They are overgrown with grass and abandoned. 
    These are the ruins of the Stalin camp and the railway tunnel. 
    A very strange situation: in Russia today is the true renessance of 
    Stalin and his ideas. 
    But why are the Stalinist monuments of the Far East and unknown Stalin 
    artifacts that are relevant in this context standing in the grass and in ruins? 
    I made a great expedition to these monuments. They are on my photos - June 15, 2018. 
    Rusty memorial cross, abandoned flowerbed, tunnel in the garbage. 
    We explored the railway arch in the forest. She is in a terrible state. 
    This is our Russian today. It is unknown in Europe.
    

IMAG0038.JPG

Edited by pavel popelskii
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Piney

@pavel popelskii  Nobody wants to admit his genocide was worse than the Nazi one. 

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Grandpa Greenman

There was a reason that that was left to rot.  Look forward not back, there are no good old days.

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Emma_Acid
20 hours ago, Piney said:

@pavel popelskii  Nobody wants to admit his genocide was worse than the Nazi one. 

No one wins playing Genocide Top Trumps

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pavel popelskii
Posted (edited)

" No one wins playing Genocide Top Trumps " Yes, but the ideas and methods of Stalin and Mao live today:

in Russia and China. Especially in Russia!

 

Edited by pavel popelskii
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Helen of Annoy
2 hours ago, pavel popelskii said:

" No one wins playing Genocide Top Trumps " Yes, but the ideas and methods of Stalin and Mao live today:

in Russia and China. Especially in Russia!

 

Sadly, I believe you said the truth.

It's possible for their ideas and methods to live on because there are psychopaths, in each nation, who find state terror appealing. When the chain of historic events give the worst psychopaths the power in a country, it takes generations to fix the damage. And while the damage of a terror regime wasn't healed yet, of course it's easier for another set of psychos to climb back into power, and keep it, because the fear is still there.

 

It was quite brave or quite silly of you to explore the ruins. Weren't you afraid there still could be something explosive in the tunnels?

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pavel popelskii
Posted (edited)

Helen of Annoy,

 

Thank you, but these unique objects are now ruins,

until 2016 they were not ruins, they were made ruins

by Russian bureaucrats from the administration.

This is the former Stalin concentration camp GULAG

on the bank of the Amur River. The objects of the huge

complex of 1939-1941: an abandoned railway tunnel in

the rock, a stone crusher, a very high stone arch, a former

monument to Stalin, unknown artifacts of the Ring and the

Cube, a mysterious living pyramidal poplar, a ruined port

with dead dry trees. We - regional historians, journalists,

diggers - have researched this place from 2011 to 2016.

This is a very safe and very old place, they came here

to see in reality a Stalinist authentic past. But in 2016,

bureaucrats from the administration destroyed the

entrance to the tunnel. Human rights defenders wrote

about this incident. In Russia, now an incredible paradox:

the study of the history of our country today is prohibited.

The last articles on the history of the Far East were

published in 2016. Digger sites do not function since 2016.

Why? This is a very interesting question. This is a real

mystery. Who in Russia wants to ban Russia's research?

 

 

Edited by pavel popelskii
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Grandpa Greenman
Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, pavel popelskii said:

Helen of Annoy,

 

Thank you, but these unique objects are now ruins,

until 2016 they were not ruins, they were made ruins

by Russian bureaucrats from the administration.

This is the former Stalin concentration camp GULAG

on the bank of the Amur River. The objects of the huge

complex of 1939-1941: an abandoned railway tunnel in

the rock, a stone crusher, a very high stone arch, a former

monument to Stalin, unknown artifacts of the Ring and the

Cube, a mysterious living pyramidal poplar, a ruined port

with dead dry trees. We - regional historians, journalists,

diggers - have researched this place from 2011 to 2016.

This is a very safe and very old place, they came here

to see in reality a Stalinist authentic past. But in 2016,

bureaucrats from the administration destroyed the

entrance to the tunnel. Human rights defenders wrote

about this incident. In Russia, now an incredible paradox:

the study of the history of our country today is prohibited.

The last articles on the history of the Far East were

published in 2016. Digger sites do not function since 2016.

Why? This is a very interesting question. This is a real

mystery. Who in Russia wants to ban Russia's research?

 

 

Thank you for explaining.  That is a good question, why would they want to suppress historical research?   There is a saying "those who don't know history are doomed to repeat it."   We have a problem with what to do Civil war era statues in the States.  Some people what to see them dumped and there are those who want to venerate them as heros.  The civil war, slavery, and the Native American wars (genocide) were a tough time in our history. A lot of shameful things were done. There are a lot of people who want to romanticize it and create a fictional past that didn't happen.  I always say the truth is in the earth.  Being the site is a former Gulag, I bet if you dig around there enough you'll find body pits.  Those should be marked as a remembrance to those who died.  I tried looking up the Gulag and found this,  I wonder how close this is to true history. http://gulaghistory.org/nps/downloads/gulag-curriculum.pdf

Edited by Grandpa Greenman
Accidentally hit the post button before I was done.
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Helen of Annoy
3 hours ago, pavel popelskii said:

Helen of Annoy,

 

Thank you, but these unique objects are now ruins,

until 2016 they were not ruins, they were made ruins

by Russian bureaucrats from the administration.

This is the former Stalin concentration camp GULAG

on the bank of the Amur River. The objects of the huge

complex of 1939-1941: an abandoned railway tunnel in

the rock, a stone crusher, a very high stone arch, a former

monument to Stalin, unknown artifacts of the Ring and the

Cube, a mysterious living pyramidal poplar, a ruined port

with dead dry trees. We - regional historians, journalists,

diggers - have researched this place from 2011 to 2016.

This is a very safe and very old place, they came here

to see in reality a Stalinist authentic past. But in 2016,

bureaucrats from the administration destroyed the

entrance to the tunnel. Human rights defenders wrote

about this incident. In Russia, now an incredible paradox:

the study of the history of our country today is prohibited.

The last articles on the history of the Far East were

published in 2016. Digger sites do not function since 2016.

Why? This is a very interesting question. This is a real

mystery. Who in Russia wants to ban Russia's research?

 

 

Thank you, Pavel, for telling us about Amur mysteries. 

I guess the bureaucracy wants to hide the history by destroying the objects that are part of it. If there are no remains of gulag, people won't ask what that structure was and gulags won't be mentioned as much as they are. That's why your work is not just interesting, but also important.  

You mentioned the unknown artifacts of the Ring and the Cube. It sounds particularly interesting, if you catch some time, would you tell us more about that? What does it look like, what do you think it is? 

Also, the dead trees, could there be something poisonous in the port?   

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pavel popelskii

Yes, on the high hill opposite this tunnel is an old cemetery. Yes, there are three graves under the birches. Graves of the prisoners of this camp of the Gulag. You ask who they are? The answer is incredible: the Japanese prisoners of war of World War II! Yes, in the city of Komsomolsk in 1946-47 worked and built houses Japanese prisoners of war. Our historians wrote about this in our and Japanese newspapers and books in 2001-2005. Many graves of Russian prisoners of the Gulag. Very dense forest - birch and larch. Former nature reserve. He too is destroyed: now in Russia in a fashion the hyperpatriotic NOTHING. It's my opinion. The Ring and the Cube? And, this is the foundation or support for the disappeared structure. They are standing over a rock crusher on a rock. Not one Cube, two Cubic Artifacts. Lombardy poplar? Yes, a strange specimen. These pyramidal poplars do not grow on the Amur River. I am a journalist and write about these artifacts many articles in the newspapers. Read some of them on these links. This is the report of the expedition in 2017. http://debri-dv.com/article/18629/pivanskiy_tonnel_novye_istoricheskie_obekty_i_nasushchnye_voprosy

18402.jpg

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Helen of Annoy

Pavel, thank you for the link to your article!

 

If I understood correctly, the statue of Stalin, and the globe, was thrown in Amur river? 

To be honest, there were far too many monuments to Stalin, everywhere. It would be bizarre to keep them all.

Of course, a statue can be placed in a museum if people don't want it in the open anymore, not thrown into a river.

Or blown up like we did in my land with some of our monuments from the former regime :D - sorry for smiling, but there were so many of these monuments, everywhere, we didn't want to look at them all the time. We still have quite a debate in my country too, some wished to keep them, because they're artistic and historic artifacts, others wanted them destroyed. I think we should have kept some (as we did), but not all of them, they were literally everywhere. It's even more complicated, but I don't want to bring too many of my problems into your thread :D

 

I might not be too sorry for the statue, but I am very sorry the natural reserve was destroyed. I recently watched a documentary about your area, Amur area, and it's so very unique. The world must not lose it. But who can stop the destruction? Many people don't really care for nature anymore, like they don't understand that we need forests or we'll choke.  

Do you have a theory where from Lombardi poplar came? Maybe somebody planted them? Your former state had many experimental projects, maybe it was an attempt of introduction of new species of poplar?  

  

 

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pavel popelskii

Helen of Annoy If I understood correctly, the statue of Stalin, and the globe, was thrown in Amur river?  Do you have a theory where from Lombardi poplar came? Maybe somebody planted them? Your former state had many experimental projects, maybe it was an attempt of introduction of new species of poplar?  

 

My answer to the first question is: it's a mystery, nobody knows. This story told me an old grandfather, a resident of the village, which are these artifacts. He told me: the monument to Stalin was destroyed at the time of Nikita Khrushchev, the globe from the pedestal of the boy was dropped into the Amur River. Also under Khrushchev. No one has investigated it: we do not have diggers-divers on the Amur. The answer to the second question: yes, in Komsomolsk in 1960-1977 the selection and planting of pyramidal poplars was conducted. Three poplars are on the outskirts of the city. Perhaps the biggest one is now in this reserve of Stalinist artifacts. Read my second article in the official Russian regional newspaper. http://www.mdgazet.ru/?module=articles&action=view&id=224

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Helen of Annoy

I'll come back later to read your second article, I must do something else right now, but I just had to tell you this right away - there's word апгрейда in the title. It's English upgrade, right? We do that in Croatian too, we just take an English word, such as that word upgrade, and write it phonetically and apply our rules on it: apgrejdati :lol: - to upgrade something. 

Native English speakers will find this either very amusing, either insulting to their language :lol:

 

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Helen of Annoy
14 hours ago, pavel popelskii said:

Helen of Annoy If I understood correctly, the statue of Stalin, and the globe, was thrown in Amur river?  Do you have a theory where from Lombardi poplar came? Maybe somebody planted them? Your former state had many experimental projects, maybe it was an attempt of introduction of new species of poplar?  

 

My answer to the first question is: it's a mystery, nobody knows. This story told me an old grandfather, a resident of the village, which are these artifacts. He told me: the monument to Stalin was destroyed at the time of Nikita Khrushchev, the globe from the pedestal of the boy was dropped into the Amur River. Also under Khrushchev. No one has investigated it: we do not have diggers-divers on the Amur. The answer to the second question: yes, in Komsomolsk in 1960-1977 the selection and planting of pyramidal poplars was conducted. Three poplars are on the outskirts of the city. Perhaps the biggest one is now in this reserve of Stalinist artifacts. Read my second article in the official Russian regional newspaper. http://www.mdgazet.ru/?module=articles&action=view&id=224

Your second article touched my heart. I wish I could too place flowers under the cross the volunteers had built, in memory of all victims of the times of repression.

You talked to many old local people, direct witnesses of history. Will you gather all their stories in one book, one day, maybe? It would be very valuable collection of testimonies. Because we're still relatively young... or not too old at least :lol: … and I already notice that young generations don't know enough about the past. They know the general facts, but they need to know what it felt like, what it looked like seen through eyes of a common man.

 

So is it your local museum that doesn't allow volunteers to keep working on preserving the historic sites? But if you, the history-keeping volunteers, would decide to be a hiking club, or something like that, would you be allowed to keep your hiking trails? Accidentally you'd explore and keep the historic sites too, but officially you'd gather to have long walks through the countryside.  

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pavel popelskii

Yes. I wrote a large photo book in two volumes: Secrets of the Far East, digger and ufologist expeditions. Guide to cities and towns from the Amur River to Vladivostok and the Russian Island. 1988 - 2016. It is not printed: it is very expensive, now the economic crisis in Russia. Color book. Literary Russian with jargon. All our museums, old libraries, collectors of steam locomotives, tsarist and Stalinist artifacts and architecture, ancient legends of the peoples of the Amur and much more. I am 46 years old. I write in 100% literary Russian, I read in English, but I do not write well in literary English. Yes, I really want to publish this book. But not in Russia, - now is not a cultural, and not a scientific situation in this country.

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Helen of Annoy
12 hours ago, pavel popelskii said:

Yes. I wrote a large photo book in two volumes: Secrets of the Far East, digger and ufologist expeditions. Guide to cities and towns from the Amur River to Vladivostok and the Russian Island. 1988 - 2016. It is not printed: it is very expensive, now the economic crisis in Russia. Color book. Literary Russian with jargon. All our museums, old libraries, collectors of steam locomotives, tsarist and Stalinist artifacts and architecture, ancient legends of the peoples of the Amur and much more. I am 46 years old. I write in 100% literary Russian, I read in English, but I do not write well in literary English. Yes, I really want to publish this book. But not in Russia, - now is not a cultural, and not a scientific situation in this country.

Impressive! 

And I understand so painfully well the economic and cultural situation you're in. It's quite similar in my country too, those who would support work, such as yours, have no money, and those who have the money are half-literate and completely disgusting. 

What can we do? Wait for better times, I guess. Your work is important, it's great that you already have the books ready in case of a miracle.

 

In the meantime, if you need any assistance with English, just send me a private message and I'll do my best to help you. People say that my English is almost decent. I don't know if that's true or they are only being polite :D

You can start your own blog here on Unexplained Mysteries too. It's free and UM has a lot of visitors. Don't hesitate just because of the language, you don't have to sound like an English professor, those who are interested will understand you even if there are some errors. 

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