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Still Waters

Giant hogweed spread to yet another US State

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Still Waters

If Hollywood wanted to make a movie about a horrifying plant invasion, giant hogweeds would make a great candidate for the lead role - they are absolutely massive, incredibly toxic, and readily spread wherever their seeds take root.

Listed as a noxious weed in at least eight states, last week the giant hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum) was spotted in Virginia for the first time.

According to reports from the Massey Herbarium at Virginia Tech university, about 30 of these towering plants have been found in Clarke County, and locals are warned to keep an eye out for sightings.

https://www.sciencealert.com/invasive-toxic-giant-hogweed-burns-skin-blindness-virginia-clarke-county

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Piney

Controlled burns using a drip torch would be the best solution. Of course I would be wearing my fire gear and Scott pack  because sap that potent would carry in the smoke. 

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The Silver Thong

I wouldn't know that plant from a hole in the ground. I would probably walk right through and never know. 

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aniknonymous

i mean.... advertise it as meth 2.0 and job is done. it will become extinct within a week (among other things)

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seanjo

Is it edible? 

 

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pallidin
13 minutes ago, seanjo said:

Is it edible? 

 

Maybe to hogs.... :o

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rashore
20 minutes ago, seanjo said:

Is it edible? 

 

No. In some places to clear out this noxious plant.. folks do things like dress up in hazmat protection and bag up the plants, kind of like they do for asbestos removal. Generally warnings of plants being newly found like in the OP, people are advised to not touch the plant in any way, but rather to call in authorities for removal. This lets authorities track the new wave moving in and safely remove the plant.

In areas that have more widespread and known infestations.. and I'm hazarding a guess that Piney has lived in such areas... a more common practice is to burn off/cull off the plants in their patches as they come up to really, really kill the area off. And when burning off fields while encountering the stuff, head to toe coverings of the fireproof and giant hogweed proof kind are recommended.

They are magnificent plants that can grow over 6 feet tall with huge white umbrellas of blossoms aloft on hairy jointed thick stems over plush wide attractive foliage. But rather dangerous.

 

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pallidin

Why are they dangerous?

To indigenous plants or to humans?

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Still Waters
9 minutes ago, pallidin said:

Why are they dangerous?

To indigenous plants or to humans?

It tells you in the link in my OP.

We have them in Britain too and they're a devil to get rid of.

https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?PID=458

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pallidin

Ah, thanks.

From the article you linked:

...as it is potentially invasive and the sap can cause severe skin burns.

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pallidin

Dang, nasty plant.  :wacko:

 

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Bunzilla

They can also cause blindness. So it's really in everyone's best interests to learn what these things look like so that it can be avoided, reported to the authorities and removed. Sadly, the last I heard, the Canadian government doesn't remove these for free like the American government does / did. Which is not a great way to eradicate a dangerous and invasive species.

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toast

Nature strikes back.

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pallidin

Does it help if one "flames" the flower tops??

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Michelle
35 minutes ago, pallidin said:

Does it help if one "flames" the flower tops??

They have a rigorous tap root system.

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flabbins

Sounds like something from Harry POTTER

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rashore

And to think.. the only reason why it's in the U.S. at all was because it was brought in as a landscaping plant.

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The Silver Thong

This hogweed plant only grows in 2 % of north america so don't be to worried 

 

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Hammerclaw
13 minutes ago, The Silver Thong said:

This hogweed plant only grows in 2 % of north america so don't be to worried 

 

Until that comets shows up and blinds everybody and the darn things start walking.

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The Silver Thong
13 minutes ago, Hammerclaw said:

Until that comets shows up and blinds everybody and the darn things start walking.

Your right. I shot a tree last year with my crossbow and it kept growing. I lost that arrow as I couldn't pull it out. We are doomed. 

 

 

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Hammerclaw

day_of_triffids_poster_02.jpg

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Essan

Genesis warned us!


Turn and run
Nothing can stop them
Around every river and canal
Their power is growing

Stamp them out
We must destroy them
They infiltrate each city
With their thick dark warning odour

They are invincible
They seem immune to all our herbicidal battering

Long ago in the Russian hills
A Victorian explorer found
The regal Hogweed by a marsh
He captured it and brought it home

Botanical creature stirs
Seeking revenge
Royal beast did not forget
He came home to London
And made a present of the Hogweed
To the Royal Gardens at Kew

Waste no time
They are approaching
Hurry now, we must protect ourselves
And find some shelter

Strike by night
They are defenseless
They all need the sun
To photosensitize their venom

Still they're invincible
Still they're immune to all our herbicidal battering

Fashionable country gentlemen
Had some cultivated wild gardens
In which they innocently planted
The Giant Hogweed throughout the land

Botanical creature stirs
Seeking revenge
Royal beast did not forget
Soon they escaped, spreading their seed
Preparing for an onslaught
Threatening the human race

Mighty Hogweed is avenged
Human bodies soon will know our anger
Kill them with your hogweed hairs
Heracleum Mantegazziani

Giant Hogweed lives!

http://lyrics.wikia.com/wiki/Genesis:The_Return_Of_The_Giant_Hogweed


Seriously, it's a big pest in the UK.  Looks like large cow parsley (a completely harmless plant) but contact with the skin can cause a severe allergic reaction and blistering.  Not nice.

 

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paperdyer
On ‎6‎/‎19‎/‎2018 at 4:01 PM, Hammerclaw said:

Until that comets shows up and blinds everybody and the darn things start walking.

Day of the Hogweed.  Catchy title.

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paperdyer

Do we know whether the burns are caused by an acidic or alkaline substance?  I'd like if you had a patch of them and the burns are caused by acid, a good dose of NaOH might work, provided the NaOH will be absorbed with the water the plant takes up.  NaCl may be good as well.  From everything that has to be done to get rid of it, the area cleared is probably sterile for a long time anyway.

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