Jump to content
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Bennu

Great Pyramid Chamber Positions

95 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

danydandan
50 minutes ago, Lord Harry said:

Spicy crank burgers recipe:

Half a dozen cranks finely minced

1 large onion chopped

6 whole eggs beaten

1 cup Worcestershire sauce

2 tbs salt

2 tbs garlic powder

3 tbs Mafdet spicy seasoning

Directions: combine the crank, onion, and eggs in a bowl, mix thoroughly.

Add salt, Worcestershire sauce, and spicy Mafdet seasoning. 

Roll into medium sized individual patties. Grill for 10-20 minutes.

Serve while hot.

No pineapples?

  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lord Harry
5 minutes ago, danydandan said:

No pineapples?

I'm saving that for my Pineapple Mafdet Tail Pizza.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lord Harry
12 minutes ago, Maidel said:

On the level of cranks, that’s pretty mild really.

floating stones, aliens and giants are the top of my weird list.

Well if you hang around here long enough you will run cranks espousing anything from aliens to lost civilizations to pyramid granaries.

Essentially if it is at odds with the historical and archaeological record, you will find a crank around these parts who will gladly promote it.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maidel

Lost civilisation boat is still out...

 

but it it depends on the definatiton of civilisation.

 

but the pyramids as granaries is just plain stupid because they aren’t hollow...

its like the nazca likes being landing strips for intergalactic aliens, yes, because that’s exactly what they would need :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lord Harry

The ancient astronaut assumption (I will not deign to call it a theory)is completely ludicrous. What it boils down to is the assumption that ancient man was too "stupid" and "primitive" to attain a sophisticated level of civilizational development on their own and thus required outside stimulus.

It is not only insulting in essence, it is completely and demonstrably untrue. Take the Great Pyramid for example. The fringe erroneously assumes it appeared in a vacuum. Proponents of the ancient astronaut assumption fail to consider more than five centuries of mortuary architectural precedent leading up to the Great Pyramid. Nor are they apparently aware of the countless man hours of trial and error needed to perfect the true pyramid form.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kmt_sesh
6 hours ago, Maidel said:

Lost civilisation boat is still out...

...

Not in the professional world of academia. A "lost civilization" is not entertained.

Quote

but the pyramids as granaries is just plain stupid because they aren’t hollow...

its like the nazca likes being landing strips for intergalactic aliens, yes, because that’s exactly what they would need :)

Now you're talking, even if Dr. Carson would disagree.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kmt_sesh
6 hours ago, Lord Harry said:

The ancient astronaut assumption (I will not deign to call it a theory)is completely ludicrous. What it boils down to is the assumption that ancient man was too "stupid" and "primitive" to attain a sophisticated level of civilizational development on their own and thus required outside stimulus.

...

Yeah. I mean, those Egyptians were clever enough to harness the power of a geyser.

I did not just say that!

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kmt_sesh
7 hours ago, danydandan said:

No pineapples?

Why would you add something so vile and loathsome to a perfectly good Mafdet recipe?

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maidel
2 hours ago, kmt_sesh said:

Not in the professional world of academia. A "lost civilization" is not entertained.

No?

 

i mean 20 years ago no one would have accepted that there would be an ancient monolith building culture in ancient turkey back in 10,000 bc.

as I said, it depends on your definition of civilisation. I’m not talking about flying cars and lasers here, I’m not even talking about the light bulb or iron working.

 

i mean type in ‘when did civilisation start’ into google and the first quote you get is this:

 

 

These various interconnections mean that history, civilization and writing all begin at the same time. That time is about 3100 BC. In about 3200 BC the two earliest civilizations develop in the region where southwest Asia joins northeast Africa. Great rivers are a crucial part of the story.

 

so for me it’s the professional world of academia that has not caught up with what it already knows, rather than looking for anything else.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bennu
On 7/13/2018 at 1:26 PM, Kenemet said:
Quote

If that's the case then you have to explain the stellar associations of all the pyramids' chambers (well over 100 of them) and why they're not the same.

Why would I have to do that? I don't recall stating that all Egyptian pyramids have their chambers positioned to match stars. Was there a rule that every pyramid had to use the same design features?

Quote

The most important stars were the "undying stars" which circled the pole in the north.  They are mentioned in mortuary texts.  Sirius is not mentioned though it was known as a marker for when the Nile floods would occur.

I don't think I need to prove that Sirius was a very significant star to the AE, kind of obvious, being the brightest star in the entire sky in addition to being associated with important goddesses like Hathor or Isis.

Quote

*How do you know the nome is named after the asterism (scholarly link, please, not a "I just figured it out")

I just figured it out, haha.

Quote

*I don't see any references to any group of stars known as "the knife."  Where des this come from?

Google, look up Egyptian constellations.
 

Quote

There's no "nome directly across the Nile from Giza."  Giza was part of the nome. 

Well, the Knife nome is partially right across from part of White Wall nome. But you may be right about the White Wall nome extending across the Nile. Does look like that. The nome maps aren't all that clear really. Anyway, it's not even a major point. The nome is called the Knife though and there is a Knife constellation, believe it or not.

Quote

It's called "white wall" because the capital city of the nome (Waset) was the "City of the White Walls."  It had a big white wall around it.

Very informative. So obviously nomes aren't all named after constellations, just some. Pretty unlikely the Haunch nome was named after an actual haunch though, considering they had a Haunch constellation, though I suppose you doubt that too.

 

 

 

Edited by Bennu

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bennu

Here's something I found interesting, in the Egyptian Book of the Dead, a reference to the Sphinx. What do you suppose it means? Are the paws and forelegs hollow? Is there something extending from the forelegs under the Nile? The quote is about a "net". You can find illustrations of Egyptian nets, they're shaped like a rectangle with pointed ends, a 6 sided figure, like a somewhat flattened hexagon. The page number was 315, hard to see at the bottom. I guess it didn't actually say forelegs and paws, just legs and feet. I assumed it meant the front ones but maybe all four. Maybe it's under the whole Sphinx he's talking about.

 

jpza8g.jpg

 

Also here's a nome map that shows the names like Knife and Haunch. Might as well post it here while I'm at it.

11tvciv.jpg

 

Edited by Bennu

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
danydandan
13 minutes ago, Bennu said:

Here's something I found interesting, in the Egyptian Book of the Dead, a reference to the Sphinx. What do you suppose it means? Are the paws and forelegs hollow? Is there something extending from the forelegs under the Nile?

 

jpza8g.jpg

 

Also here's a nome map that shows the names like Knife and Haunch. Might as well post it here while I'm at it.

11tvciv.jpg

 

Here is two links to articles I read a few weeks ago regarding the constellations. It's quite interesting.  It's clear looking at all the constellations and the names of each area (nome) that they aren't all named after constellations.

https://www.google.com/url?q=http://sino-platonic.org/complete/spp253_ancient_egyptian_constellations.pdf&sa=U&ved=0ahUKEwioi_yvr6HcAhVHDMAKHTLHAOYQFggLMAA&usg=AOvVaw2KCcRcoCIjT44e2PSkfmrf

https://www.google.com/url?q=http://www.iac.es/proyecto/arqueoastronomia/media/Belmonte_Shaltout_Chapter_6.pdf&sa=U&ved=0ahUKEwioi_yvr6HcAhVHDMAKHTLHAOYQFggVMAM&usg=AOvVaw3f9hOsyBiR_-GCUYyvp_eP

Here is another: http://adsabs.harvard.edu/full/1985JHAS...16..102D

Edit; I don't know about their accuracy or anything I just found them interesting.

 

Edited by danydandan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bennu

Maybe something like this. It's called a clap net, that's just the frame part. Just a Google Earth image of the Sphinx, couldn't find an actual overhead photo, kind of distorted. BTW the god mentioned in the Book of the Dead quote, Tmu, was apparently similar to Tammuz. I guess that's the "fork" in the Sphinx Temple. Probably something under there, Tmu's "tomb of the earth" perhaps, though that may mean the entire earth is his tomb. Kind of suspicious that the fork is right in the Temple, if I have it positioned correctly. I posted a quote about Tmu at the bottom.

2zsvc4y.jpg

 

Here's the full image showing the net part too. Or maybe it's a different net, I don't know. I just used the frame looking part.

egyptian-clap-net.gif

 

Tmu quote from page 92 of Suns of God, by Acharya S. There's a Google Books preview.

Tmu.gif

Edited by Bennu

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kenemet
7 hours ago, Bennu said:
  Quote

If that's the case then you have to explain the stellar associations of all the pyramids' chambers (well over 100 of them) and why they're not the same.

Why would I have to do that? I don't recall stating that all Egyptian pyramids have their chambers positioned to match stars. Was there a rule that every pyramid had to use the same design features?

  Quote

The most important stars were the "undying stars" which circled the pole in the north.  They are mentioned in mortuary texts.  Sirius is not mentioned though it was known as a marker for when the Nile floods would occur.

I don't think I need to prove that Sirius was a very significant star to the AE, kind of obvious, being the brightest star in the entire sky in addition to being associated with important goddesses like Hathor or Isis.

  Quote

*How do you know the nome is named after the asterism (scholarly link, please, not a "I just figured it out")

I just figured it out, haha.

  Quote

*I don't see any references to any group of stars known as "the knife."  Where des this come from?

Google, look up Egyptian constellations.
 

  Quote

There's no "nome directly across the Nile from Giza."  Giza was part of the nome. 

Well, the Knife nome is partially right across from part of White Wall nome. But you may be right about the White Wall nome extending across the Nile. Does look like that. The nome maps aren't all that clear really. Anyway, it's not even a major point. The nome is called the Knife though and there is a Knife constellation, believe it or not.

  Quote

It's called "white wall" because the capital city of the nome (Waset) was the "City of the White Walls."  It had a big white wall around it.

Very informative. So obviously nomes aren't all named after constellations, just some. Pretty unlikely the Haunch nome was named after an actual haunch though, considering they had a Haunch constellation, though I suppose you doubt that too

You have to show that there are stellar correspondences because if they did it for one pyramid then it was very important and they would be doing it for other pyramids.  The king's whim was the law of the land.  If it was a one-time thing, then the changes would exist for one king and go back to the old ways after that (as happened with Akhenaten.)  If it's actually significant, then the pattern would be repeated.

If it's not based on anything but solving architectural problems then the design would change and evolve over time and then become stable.

I think that your google skills probably sent you to the wrong spot.  Here is a REAL list of ancient Egyptian constellations:

http://www.members.westnet.com.au/gary-david-thompson/page11-19.html

"Knife" isn't one of them.

"Haunch" in astronomical terms is actually "the bull's foreleg" and it's a common symbol in offering inscriptions.  It predates the naming of the constellations.  The nome you are talking about is "Cow's thigh" ("haunch" is sometimes used interchanbeably there) and it, as with other nomes, don't have a corresponding constellation.

See list of nomes here: https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nome_(Egypt) 

 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kenemet
4 hours ago, Bennu said:

Here's something I found interesting, in the Egyptian Book of the Dead, a reference to the Sphinx. What do you suppose it means? Are the paws and forelegs hollow? Is there something extending from the forelegs under the Nile? The quote is about a "net". You can find illustrations of Egyptian nets, they're shaped like a rectangle with pointed ends, a 6 sided figure, like a somewhat flattened hexagon. The page number was 315, hard to see at the bottom. I guess it didn't actually say forelegs and paws, just legs and feet. I assumed it meant the front ones but maybe all four. Maybe it's under the whole Sphinx he's talking about.

Can you provide a link to this "reference to the Sphinx"?

Also... you can run into a lot of problems here.  There's not a single document called the "book of the Dead."  Instead it's a loose collection of verses found inside coffins and on scrolls (every one of them is different) and dates from First Intermediate Period all the way through the Ptolemaic period.  So the quote you may be looking at could come from a Roman era tomb and buried with a Roman in Egypt... or it could be a real Egyptian from after the collapse of the 6th dynasty.

Or you could be looking at two sentences from two very different coffins.

Source, please.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bennu
50 minutes ago, Kenemet said:

Can you provide a link to this "reference to the Sphinx"?

Also... you can run into a lot of problems here.  There's not a single document called the "book of the Dead."  Instead it's a loose collection of verses found inside coffins and on scrolls (every one of them is different) and dates from First Intermediate Period all the way through the Ptolemaic period.  So the quote you may be looking at could come from a Roman era tomb and buried with a Roman in Egypt... or it could be a real Egyptian from after the collapse of the 6th dynasty.

Or you could be looking at two sentences from two very different coffins.

Source, please.

Sorry, I just screen capped that part, can't actually find the page again at the moment. Thought I bookmarked it or something but guess not. I'll find it someday. Apparently that was a lucky find the first time. Anyway, here's another version of my Sphinx net. I figured the writer probably meant the forelegs and therefore the main part of the frame should be at their length.

2nja4ua.jpg

Edited by Bennu

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bennu
1 hour ago, Kenemet said:

You have to show that there are stellar correspondences because if they did it for one pyramid then it was very important and they would be doing it for other pyramids.  The king's whim was the law of the land.  If it was a one-time thing, then the changes would exist for one king and go back to the old ways after that (as happened with Akhenaten.)  If it's actually significant, then the pattern would be repeated.

If it's not based on anything but solving architectural problems then the design would change and evolve over time and then become stable.

I think that your google skills probably sent you to the wrong spot.  Here is a REAL list of ancient Egyptian constellations:

http://www.members.westnet.com.au/gary-david-thompson/page11-19.html

"Knife" isn't one of them.

"Haunch" in astronomical terms is actually "the bull's foreleg" and it's a common symbol in offering inscriptions.  It predates the naming of the constellations.  The nome you are talking about is "Cow's thigh" ("haunch" is sometimes used interchanbeably there) and it, as with other nomes, don't have a corresponding constellation.

See list of nomes here: https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nome_(Egypt) 

 

 

 

 

The Knife is not a widely known Egyptian constellation. It can be seen just to the right of the crack in this artifact. And who knew they had a beetle constellation? Apparently their version of Cancer, not a crab but a dung beetle. The things you learn from obscure artifacts. But what's that thing next to the Knife? Looks like a hand reaching down. Must be their version of Aquilae.

1264oiu.jpg

Edited by Bennu

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kenemet
1 hour ago, Bennu said:

 

The Knife is not a widely known Egyptian constellation. It can be seen just to the right of the crack in this artifact. And who knew they had a beetle constellation? Apparently their version of Cancer, not a crab but a dung beetle. The things you learn from obscure artifacts. But what's that thing next to the Knife? Looks like a hand reaching down. Must be their version of Aquilae.

1264oiu.jpg

Those are New Kingdom constellations from around the time of Cleopatra.  The ones I linked are from the time of the Pyramids.  Yours are 2,000 years younger and influenced by several conquerors.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kmt_sesh
14 hours ago, Maidel said:

No?

 

i mean 20 years ago no one would have accepted that there would be an ancient monolith building culture in ancient turkey back in 10,000 bc.

as I said, it depends on your definition of civilisation. I’m not talking about flying cars and lasers here, I’m not even talking about the light bulb or iron working.

 

i mean type in ‘when did civilisation start’ into google and the first quote you get is this:

 

 

These various interconnections mean that history, civilization and writing all begin at the same time. That time is about 3100 BC. In about 3200 BC the two earliest civilizations develop in the region where southwest Asia joins northeast Africa. Great rivers are a crucial part of the story.

 

so for me it’s the professional world of academia that has not caught up with what it already knows, rather than looking for anything else.

The professional world of academia defines what is known. And if you know any of the folks who comprise that world, you'll know without fail that they are always looking and are always eager for new evidence. I work among them. A respected Egyptologist with whom I've worked (now retired) likes to joke that everything she knew in graduate school is now wrong. People who don't really understand historical research—and especially folks mired in the fringe camp—like to think that all historians are dodgy old fossils who are eternally stuck in their unchanging studies. Thy have no idea gow wrong they are.

For one thing, don't use Google to learn about the rise of civilizations. Use a decent history book or two written by respected historians. Google is too convenient, often too self-limiting, and often wrong. There are specific criteria for defining an historical civilizations. What you were looking at is only the Mesopotamian and North African region (think of others like China and Mesoamerica). Göbekli Tepe, for instance, is not considered a civilization, at least not by proper historical standards. "Culture" or "society" are more appropriate terms. So your definition of civilization doesn't matter, nor does mine or his or hers. If we're talking about real historical research, adhere to the criteria.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kmt_sesh
7 hours ago, Bennu said:

Here's something I found interesting, in the Egyptian Book of the Dead, a reference to the Sphinx. What do you suppose it means? Are the paws and forelegs hollow? Is there something extending from the forelegs under the Nile? The quote is about a "net". You can find illustrations of Egyptian nets, they're shaped like a rectangle with pointed ends, a 6 sided figure, like a somewhat flattened hexagon. The page number was 315, hard to see at the bottom. I guess it didn't actually say forelegs and paws, just legs and feet. I assumed it meant the front ones but maybe all four. Maybe it's under the whole Sphinx he's talking about.

 

jpza8g.jpg

 

...

The Sphinx was considered in the New Kingdom to be a god, and the Book of the Dead, although originating somewhat earlier, became widespread in the New Kingdom. In this time period the Sphinx went by different names such as Horemakhet and Re-Horemakhet, manifestations of the great falcon god Horus. If you read more of the Book of the Dead and even the earlier religious corpuses (Coffin Texts, Pyramid Texts) you'll see a similar theme to what you found: the limbs and various other body parts of deceased folks and divine beings are often individually named and ascribed to deities or other sacred things. It's complicated but it's a way to express the divinity inherent in everyone and everything.

There's nothing "hallow" about the Sphinx, and nothing below it. That's not realistic. Some years back they sunk deep bore holes all around the Sphinx to investigate the preponderance of ground-water seepage, and they even slipped cameras down the holes as long as they were there. They found nothing below the Sphinx.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kmt_sesh
3 hours ago, Kenemet said:

Can you provide a link to this "reference to the Sphinx"?

...

I have a sinking suspicion that the excerpt from the Book of the Dead that Bennu pulled comes from Budge. Ew. Most posters are not going to know that you don't want to use Budge's work, and yet with no copyrights because it's so old, his work is everywhere,

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bennu

Okay guys, thanks for the input. About the artifact with the constellations, it's clear that what was identified in the article as the Knife is not in Delphinus. It's clearly between Cancer and Libra on the ecliptic. What it really is must be what we call Leo, and the "hand" next to it must be Virgo. Apparently it's not a carving of a knife but some kind of animal, I can see little legs under it. It could be a lion. Aries doesn't look like a goat man either, more like another lion actually.

So anyway, the Knife is obviously not one of the Egyptian zodiacal constellations, just a normal one somewhere other than on the ecliptic, like in Delphinus. So I won't call the asterism in the King's Chamber "the Knife" anymore, just Delphinus, the Egyptian version thereof, which appears to be an owl. Interestingly, the asterism I positioned in the KC was known a a "coffin" by many cultures. Rather appropriate for the KC, don't you think? Maybe in Khufu's time it was seen as that.

Edited by Bennu

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bennu

Well actually the history of the "coffin" name is unknown. It would be appropriate though as I said. Here's a page showing the owl on a wall panel, right above Aries, which is where the Coffin is. The woman next to it, with a star over her head, may be Altair, just a guess, someone will probably correct me though. Actually, that may not even be an owl, and there's another one over farther to the right. Maybe hawks or something. http://brycechurchill.com/astrology-in-ancient-egypt/

Edited by Bennu

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kenemet
On 7/17/2018 at 4:25 AM, Bennu said:

Well actually the history of the "coffin" name is unknown. It would be appropriate though as I said. Here's a page showing the owl on a wall panel, right above Aries, which is where the Coffin is. The woman next to it, with a star over her head, may be Altair, just a guess, someone will probably correct me though. Actually, that may not even be an owl, and there's another one over farther to the right. Maybe hawks or something. http://brycechurchill.com/astrology-in-ancient-egypt/

...and it dates from the time of Cleopatra, as I said.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bennu
On 7/19/2018 at 1:43 AM, Kenemet said:

...and it dates from the time of Cleopatra, as I said.

But where did THEY get the idea? Just out of thin air huh? Just started freelancing asterism names for kicks?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.