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Latest hunt for Thylacine


Ozfactor
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https://www.news.com.au/technology/science/animals/the-bold-effort-to-prove-the-tasmanian-tiger-is-still-out-there/news-story/c7da39c84dc700c2bbb94654a50f5862

Forrest Galante is a wildlife biologist who’s made it his life mission to search for animals that have wrongly been deemed extinct — and among the species on his list is the Tasmanian tiger.

“Animals are often declared extinct wrongly and without the proper investigation,” he told news.com.au. “The process in which a species is declared extinct is very vague. It’s almost impossible to say something isn’t there … that difficulty of proof leads to an ease of declaring something extinct.”

 But rather than heading to Tasmania, the search focused on mainland Australia — specifically Cape York where James Cook University is funding a large study into the species, following recent eyewitness stories.

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Well, fingers crossed and all that but I'm not holding my breath.

Whats you're thoughts @oldrover

Edited by Stiff
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1 hour ago, Stiff said:

Well, fingers crossed and all that but I'm not holding my breath.

Whats you're thoughts @oldrover

 

Firstly, I've heard of this before but I can't remember in what context, if he has managed to film a leopard in Zanzibar though all credit  to him. 

But, the thylacine, looking for the thylacine on mainkand? No, that's just silly. The James Cook uni mob have 'recieved funding to set camera traps to look for tye species', yes that's what's being reported, and they've been quoted as saying so. But is it true? Well a friend of mine did some digging and the answer is- is it hell! The James Cook uni survey is in fact funded as a study of the region's bettong population. As I always comment on this, to demonstate whyy they're talking tiger first think of a thylacine, get a mental image of one, now think of a bettong. That's why. This survey has reported worldwide because it's got the tiger name.

But this is just TV and on a Discovery channel too, so you can't expect much. 

 

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My mate worked in New Guinea for years and the locals in the highlands apparently had a name for the thylacine when showed pics of one.This was before internet and they had no electricity for TV etc.They were not confusing it with dogs or other animals.

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8 minutes ago, openozy said:

My mate worked in New Guinea for years and the locals in the highlands apparently had a name for the thylacine when showed pics of one.This was before internet and they had no electricity for TV etc.They were not confusing it with dogs or other animals.

What year was that then?

 

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27 minutes ago, openozy said:

It was about 35 to 40 years ago.

Can't think where he'd have got his thylacine pictures from back then. But I do know of other people who tell the same story.

A missionary called Morgan is the first bloke in this as far as I know. He reported that this animal the Dobsegna was known to the locals. Then in the 80's/90's a Tasmanian named Ned Terry went up there but found nothing. There's been one or two attempts since.

As far as I'm aware there's not enough info tto say much about the tiger in NG, but the 'locaks say' stories don't ammount to evidence in  my book. 

Edited by oldrover
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37 minutes ago, seanjo said:

Why is this in 'cryptozoology'? The Tasmanian Tiger was a real beast and there is a reasonable chance some still live.

Thethylacine was a real aninal, but we've got very good evidence that it's extinct, it's just never cited in the popular sources. This is pure cryptozoology. 

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3 hours ago, openozy said:

It was about 35 to 40 years ago.

All of your posts I’ve seen here on UM have been about things you’re claiming to have happened years ago, accompanied by zero evidence.

What’s the problem?

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1 hour ago, seanjo said:

Why is this in 'cryptozoology'? The Tasmanian Tiger was a real beast and there is a reasonable chance some still live.

There’s a possibility some still live, but not a reasonable chance. IMO

Some use ‘cryptozoology’ too loosely, a species which shouldn’t be where it is.

I don’t think that the term should apply to an apparently extinct species which may still be in existence in the same location. 

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I'd argue that the thylacine that most, and I want to emphasise most not all, people are 'investigating' today is not based on the limited kniwledge we have of the animal. Instead it's basically the pop culture version portrayed by non-specialists. The oddly moving yellowy charicature is a modern construct and never existed in reality, so again I think it's as fictitous as bigfoot and so therefore classic cryptozoology. 

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Native forest covers about 3.2 million hectares of Tasmania about half its total land area. It was the last know land with Thylacine. If I would search somewhere it would be there first. Don't know if aboriginal knowledge in the mainland Australia could backup their presence in the last 1000years but we know that Thylacine was present in Tasmania in the past 100years.

Do they have introduced some back in the Australia mainland ?

Edited by Jon the frog
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13 minutes ago, Jon the frog said:

Native forest covers about 3.2 million hectares of Tasmania about half its total land area. It was the last know land with Thylacine. If I would search somewhere it would be there first. Don't know if aboriginal knowledge in the mainland Australia could backup their presence in the last 1000years but we know that Thylacine was present in Tasmania in the past 100years.

Do they have introduced some back in the Australia mainland ?

Doesn't matter. The whole state was trapped intensively for a hundred years or so and we have a very clear record of that effect on the thylacine. They were wiped out. 

There were no thylacines released on the mainland. 

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6 hours ago, seanjo said:

Why is this in 'cryptozoology'? The Tasmanian Tiger was a real beast and there is a reasonable chance some still live.

I posted this article in The Natural World , I didn't post it in Cryptozoology . I don't know why it was moved . 

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Last night I was reading about Thylacine sightings on mainland Australia and a man who had a sighting said it reminded him of a fossa. I had never heard of a fossa so I googled fossa and it is a Madagascan carnivore. The fossa also reminded me of a thylacine , the tail , back legs and general shape . 
 

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13 minutes ago, Ozfactor said:

Last night I was reading about Thylacine sightings on mainland Australia and a man who had a sighting said it reminded him of a fossa. I had never heard of a fossa so I googled fossa and it is a Madagascan carnivore. The fossa also reminded me of a thylacine , the tail , back legs and general shape . 
 

There's a trend online to photoshop fossas to look like thylacines. 

I was lucky enough to see a fossa once in a captive breeding programme. I had a tremendous ammount of interaction with it, it was one of the highlights of my life. But I get the sad idea that a coouple of decades after I'm dead someone will be tracing the fossa's final years in the zoos they were held in the same way I do with the thylacine.

Edited by oldrover
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1 hour ago, oldrover said:

There's a trend online to photoshop fossas to look like thylacines. 

I was lucky enough to see a fossa once in a captive breeding programme. I had a tremendous ammount of interaction with it, it was one of the highlights of my life. But I get the sad idea that a coouple of decades after I'm dead someone will be tracing the fossa's final years in the zoos they were held in the same way I do with the thylacine.

I saw the photoshop fossas with fake stripes , they call them zebra fossas . Yes that would have been an incredible experience to interact with a fossa , did it remind you of a thylacine ?

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13 minutes ago, Ozfactor said:

I saw the photoshop fossas with fake stripes , they call them zebra fossas . Yes that would have been an incredible experience to interact with a fossa , did it remind you of a thylacine ?

Aside from the head, the fossa has always reminded e strongly of the thylacine. Obviously very different when you get down to it in behaviour, agility, and much more besides but at a glance the body is sort of similarly proportioned. In the flesh though it didn't. It was much smaller than I was expecting, in the picture they look quite stocky and hefty but it actually looked much more lightly built, sleeker and much more arboreal if you see what I mean. More like a cat-weasel sort of thing. 

When I first approached the cage there was a group of idiots laughing at it, as it was just pacing back and forth obviously unhappy. When I got there they pushed off, and as soon as they did it changed completely. I spoke to it, in fact I had about an hours worth of one sided conversation with it, and as soon as I started it shot up the mesh of its cage until we were eye level and just stayed there. It did pop down and back and forth into its little house a few times, but it kept coming back up to eye level. It did vocalise a few times back at me, a sort of squeaky little cry as I remember. I don't think anyone else came while I was there, it was just the two of us. 

It was an incredible experience and one I'll never forget. But, as I say I'm very concerned for their future. I'm writing this here as I'm having a break from writing a very overdue paper on the thylacine, in that I'm going through statements etc from people who visited the Beaumaris Zoo back in the 30's and stood in front of the thylacine cage just like I stood in front of the fossa's. And if someone was to read this thread in 100 years (they won't of course but if) I'm sadly sure that they'l be thinking of me 'you lucky *******, I just wish I could have stood there' as I do when I read the comments of 80 odd years ago.  

 

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9 hours ago, Timothy said:

All of your posts I’ve seen here on UM have been about things you’re claiming to have happened years ago, accompanied by zero evidence.

What’s the problem?

The same as 99% of posts by everyone here.Your the problem ,I haven't seen one bit of interesting stuff from you, only your over inflated ,naïve,opinion.

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23 minutes ago, openozy said:

The same as 99% of posts by everyone here.Your the problem ,I haven't seen one bit of interesting stuff from you, only your over inflated ,naïve,opinion.

Happy Sunday morning to you too. :st

I’d love for a lot of what people claim here to be true. I’d also love if they had more evidence. Last I saw you weren’t helping yourself much when members were asking questions of your experiences.

Human perception can be extremely fallible, and the longer after the event, memory gets further corrupted. 

Do you agree with that? 

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In general life events but not this stuff,I've answered most people even the ones calling me a blatant liar,so what do you want, an arm off a gnome or thylacine feaces.

Edited by openozy
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44 minutes ago, openozy said:

In general life events but not this stuff,I've answered most people even the ones calling me a blatant liar,so what do you want, an arm off a gnome or thylacine feaces.

The arm would probably do it.

The New Guinea thing is a possibility, some believe a population of thylacines could have survived into the 20th century there. It would be good if you know what the locals called it when shown the pictures?

Could have always just been a misidentification of the https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Guinea_singing_dog 

Anyways we should probably stop derailing this thread. I’m sure we can pick it up in the other one if we need to.

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The locals weren't educated but they knew their animals,it wasn't a dog they were naming when asked.I'm familiar with the singing dog as have been a dog enthusiast since young.Looks nothing like a thylacine anyway.Can't see it derailing the thread when discussing sightings of the animal subject.

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