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Ozfactor

Researchers find lake under Mars surface

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Nnicolette

So just how cold is the water?

 

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third_eye

I guess there's no need to bring along bikinis ...

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Seti42

Aren't the Mars polar caps frozen carbon dioxide (AKA dry ice)? I don't see how liquid water could exist under that without being geothermally heated...Regardless of salt content. Maybe I'm missing something; I am not a chemist, lol.

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ShadowSot
1 hour ago, Seti42 said:

Aren't the Mars polar caps frozen carbon dioxide (AKA dry ice)? I don't see how liquid water could exist under that without being geothermally heated...Regardless of salt content. Maybe I'm missing something; I am not a chemist, lol.

High salt content and pressure from above. Water expands as it freezes, if it can't expand it'll stay liquid. More or less. There's videos of this online. 

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Ozfactor

This is an interesting read if you have the time, and the hypothesis of Mars being covered in oceans might be proven true 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mars_ocean_hypothesis

350px-AncientMars.jpg
 
An artist's impression of ancient Mars and its oceans based on geological data
350px-MarsTopoMap-PIA02031_modest.jpg
 
The blue region of low topography in the Martian northern hemisphere is hypothesized to be the site of a primordial ocean of liquid water.[1]

The Mars ocean hypothesis states that nearly a third of the surface of Mars was covered by an ocean of liquid water early in the planet’s geologic history.[2][3][4] This primordial ocean, dubbed Paleo-Ocean[1] and Oceanus Borealis,[5] would have filled the basin Vastitas Borealis in the northern hemisphere, a region which lies 4–5 km (2.5–3 miles) below the mean planetary elevation, at a time period of approximately 4.1–3.8 billion years ago. Evidence for this ocean includes geographic features resembling ancient shorelines, and the chemical properties of the Martian soil and atmosphere.[6][7][8] Early Mars would have required a denser atmosphere and warmer climate to allow liquid water to remain at the surface.[9]

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Astra.
On 26/07/2018 at 8:49 AM, third_eye said:

I guess there's no need to bring along bikinis ...

~

You wear bikinis ? :whistle:..

 

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third_eye
19 hours ago, Astra. said:

You wear bikinis ? :whistle:..

 

Oh ... on such occasions when the weather is just right ... I like the purple ones ... :D

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qxcontinuum
On 2018-07-25 at 10:11 PM, Seti42 said:

Aren't the Mars polar caps frozen carbon dioxide (AKA dry ice)? I don't see how liquid water could exist under that without being geothermally heated...Regardless of salt content. Maybe I'm missing something; I am not a chemist, lol.

Apparently Mars soil still has a certain quantity of water . It is believed that most of the water on Mars didn't disappear with its atmosphere but was soaked underground. 

Edited by qxcontinuum

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woopypooky

Is it H2O?

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Waspie_Dwarf
39 minutes ago, woopypooky said:

Is it H2O?

If it isn't H2O it isn't water.

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