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Meteorite found in Africa is older than the Earth

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Orphalesion

In danger of sounding ditzy...

Neat!

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OverSword

Super Neat!

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Merc14
Posted (edited)

Incredibly neat!!  :D   A piece of our solar system before it really was one!  Was the Sun still forming or already there and just gathering its disk? 

Edited by Merc14
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MyOtherAccount

I wonder how they date such a thing.

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Seti42

https://geomaps.wr.usgs.gov/parks/gtime/ageofearth.html

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NuclearImplosion
16 hours ago, MyOtherAccount said:

I wonder how they date such a thing.

Not doubting the authenticity ... but I did wonder the same thing.

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RoofGardener
4 minutes ago, NuclearImplosion said:

Not doubting the authenticity ... but I did wonder the same thing.

Carbon dating, presumably ? 

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Harte

Only if you think the Earth is less than 60k years old.

Harte

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Harte
Quote

Aluminium-26 can be used to calculate the terrestrial age of meteorites. After the breakup of the meteorite parent body, it will be bombarded by cosmic rays, which will saturate it in aluminium-26. After falling to earth, 26Al production ceases, which means that the amount of 26Al in the sample can be used to calculate the date the meteorite fell to earth.

wiki

Quote

The 26Al–26Mg isotope systematics were determined for whole rock (WR) and mineral separates of NWA 11119 (Supplementary Data 7). These define an isochron corresponding to a 26Al/27Al ratio at the time of crystallization of this sample of (1.69 ± 0.09) × 10−6 (Fig. 5). Previously, the highest value reported for an achondrite internal 26Al–26Mg isochron was (1.28 ± 0.07) × 10−6 (for the ancient cumulate eucrite Asuka 88139427). Relative to the D’Orbigny angrite age anchor28,29, the 26Al–26Mg age of NWA 11119 is 4564.8 ± 0.3 Ma (Fig. 5). It is also possible to calculate a 26Al–26Mg age relative to the first-formed refractory solids in the solar protoplanetary disk that are characterized by a canonical 26Al/27Al ratio of 5.2 × 10−5 30. However, the reported Pb–Pb ages for these refractory solids span ~0.6 Ma30,31,32, leading to a range of 26Al–26Mg ages of 4563.7 ± 0.2 –4564.4 ± 0.3 Ma for NWA 11119. Consideration of the full range of these 26Al–26Mg ages (obtained relative to the D’Orbigny angrite or the refractory inclusions) and the Pb–Pb ages of the refractory inclusions30,31,32 indicates that NWA 11119 was formed 2.5–3.5 Ma after the first-formed refractory solids in the solar protoplanetary disk.

Source: Scientist mentioned in the story (et al.)

Harte

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MyOtherAccount
Posted (edited)

Thanks Harte!

 

Edited by MyOtherAccount
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Amanda Evans
Posted (edited)

It’s all sparkly!

Edited by Amanda Evans
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TripGun

Geologists are always talking schist.

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Norpheus

And if its older than earth..
Where did the Dating Data
Coming from?

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taniwha
On 18/08/2018 at 8:00 AM, Norpheus said:

And if its older than earth..
Where did the Dating Data
Coming from?

From the future?

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