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Planet is so hot that even metal evaporates

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paperdyer

So how hot is this Planet's sun?  Seeing our yellow sun, per the article, is 6000°C, its sun must be a blue-white star.  Even if you could stand the temperature, you couldn't put on enough sunblock to keep the UV from frying you.

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Antnanna

Call me astronomically naive. But how can we be sure that what we observe or feel we observe in our solar system, is the same in all? How can we be sure there are not other elements we know nothing about that share a similar visual characteristic?

Edited by Antnanna

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Rolci

I remember back in the day watching the Discovery documentary How the Universe Works and there was a whole episode on Hot Jupiters, which were discovered all the way back in the '90s I think. So what's new here?

As for the possibility of "other elements" in distant parts of the universe, try stretching it a bit, notice that you're still thinking in terms of elements. How about different laws of physics? Who said that for example what they like to call "universal constants" are constant let alone universal (across space, let alone time). And then you can have the same argument regarding "laws" of nature, equally considered universal (for no apparent reason). There can be (and probably are) isolated parts of the universe made of antimatter galaxies and stars, similarly there could be "islands" where constants are different and even "laws" are different. Time could be flowing backwards. (Heck, there is not even a known law that would not allow it, indeed it is one of the big unexplained questions why time flows in the direction it does and not backwards, which is as valid a question as Why was there more matter left after the Big Bang than antimatter, if they were "produced" in equal quantities?)

Edited by Rolci

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Rlyeh
9 hours ago, Antnanna said:

Call me astronomically naive. But how can we be sure that what we observe or feel we observe in our solar system, is the same in all? How can we be sure there are not other elements we know nothing about that share a similar visual characteristic?

And chemically naive. You should find out what an element is.

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taniwha

The nightside of the planet never sees the daylight but is still perhaps a whopping 2000 degrees Celsius! 

But that's not hot enough to melt tungsten, if indeed any exists there.

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