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Leak on ISS was 'drilled from the inside'

48 posts in this topic

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Jon the frog

To much vodka !

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seanjo

Can't believe it was done by an ISS inhabitant.

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Dark_Grey
12 minutes ago, seanjo said:

Can't believe it was done by an ISS inhabitant.

I know! What is going on up there?

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seanjo
2 minutes ago, Dark_Grey said:

I know! What is going on up there?

Nothing, this was done on the ground, if the conclusion made is correct.

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bigjim36

Sounds like a case for.....Space Force!

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Dark_Grey
9 minutes ago, seanjo said:

Nothing, this was done on the ground, if the conclusion made is correct.

In some ways that's even more unnerving. Seems like a "build quality" issue

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OverSword
6 minutes ago, Dark_Grey said:

In some ways that's even more unnerving. Seems like a "build quality" issue

Substandard construction on the Russian built module?  Hard to believe because when I think Russian built I think quality. :lol:

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seanjo
12 minutes ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

The Soyuz passed all the quality control testing (they are pressure checked). This hole was behind padding, where it couldn't be seen by visual inspection. 

It is believed that the hole was plugged with glue. The glue dried out and then the leak appeared. 

If workers are trying to hide mistakes rather than admit them then there is a managerial issue.

Not necessarily, I've known mistakes covered up because the tradesman didn't want their reputation to suffer.

 

22 + years as an RAF Airframe tech, openness was encouraged but not always stuck too.

Edited by seanjo
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Dark_Grey
35 minutes ago, OverSword said:

Substandard construction on the Russian built module?  Hard to believe because when I think Russian built I think quality. :lol:

lol powerful "Russian steel" comes to mind. In Russia, does it matter on what day of the week your car was made?

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and then
56 minutes ago, seanjo said:

Nothing, this was done on the ground, if the conclusion made is correct.

Why would they only now have noticed the leak?  I think someone used the bulkhead for a bench and over penetrated something they were drilling OR they tried hanging sexy pin-ups and forgot that it wasn't drywall. :w00t:

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and then
43 minutes ago, OverSword said:

Substandard construction on the Russian built module?  Hard to believe because when I think Russian built I think quality. :lol:

Quality, no, strong...definitely.

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paperdyer

If Waspie's info is correct, there may be trace amounts of glue left for the full investigation when the specie craft returns home.

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seanjo
23 minutes ago, and then said:

Why would they only now have noticed the leak?  I think someone used the bulkhead for a bench and over penetrated something they were drilling OR they tried hanging sexy pin-ups and forgot that it wasn't drywall. :w00t:

As was said, the perpetrator filled the hole with glue, but the glue dried out and disintegrated in orbit.

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and then
1 minute ago, seanjo said:

As was said, the perpetrator filled the hole with glue, but the glue dried out and disintegrated in orbit.

Having a bit of fun... I read it afterward and saw that.  Working in a program like that, there shouldn't be such pressure on the technicians that they are afraid to admit making a serious mistake but apparently, there was.  I hope it's an isolated incident.

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Jon the frog
32 minutes ago, and then said:

Having a bit of fun... I read it afterward and saw that.  Working in a program like that, there shouldn't be such pressure on the technicians that they are afraid to admit making a serious mistake but apparently, there was.  I hope it's an isolated incident.

A lot of them have passed unnoticed probably...

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Gecks

Atleast its considered a mistake in worksmanship. When I began reading the article I was concerned it was sabotaged by someone on board.

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cyclopes500

If it'd happened on a Salut they'd have found out who was responsible and shot him.

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Seti42

Those pictures are fake. The ISS is not even made out of such material. Also, no one would do that. Ever. 

Also, look up the source. "chrisB - NSF" Not at NASA.gov. At nasaspaceflight.com.

 

Edited by Seti42

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Nzo

That totally looks like someone who tried to drill from the inside. You can see where the bit did not bite into the metal and it slid. That is insane. So that means that someone from inside tried to sabotage the station. Dont they have cams inside in every direction on 24/7 to monitor the common areas? If not this is obviously the time to have one. Looks like some incredibly mentally ill person.... NOT THE RIGHT STUFF!

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cyclopes500

The first thing that came into my mind when I read about the patching method was Apollo 13 and the incompatibility problem they had with the CO2 scrubbing cartridges from the command module and the moon lander. They had to use what they had to hand to make a spare plug fit in a round hole;a problem the average toddler faces with certain types of toys. But the apollo incident occurred in the 1970's.That hole appeared in 2018.48 years later. The fact that the space station had no proper purpose designed instant energency patches to use horrified me. To me fixing the hole should have been quick and simple. Press on and then cover with a fast acting strong glue that sets in seconds even in a vaccum. I say this. Micrometeors can arrive in groups and such a repair kit is definitely needed.

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Timothy
20 hours ago, Waspie_Dwarf said:

The Soyuz passed all the quality control testing (they are pressure checked). This hole was behind padding, where it couldn't be seen by visual inspection. 

It is believed that the hole was plugged with glue. The glue dried out and then the leak appeared. 

If workers are trying to hide mistakes rather than admit them then there is a managerial issue.

Thanks for your explanation. But I’m very amateur with this.

Was the capsule recently launched, and only when it docked and was pressurised, the decompression was detected?  

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toast

And again, Germany is playing a major role in spaceflight:

Quote

When the two-millimetre slash was detected, European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst reportedly put his finger over the hole to try to plug the leak.

The Guardian

:lol:

BTW: Alexander Gertst`s nickname here in Germany is: Astro-Alex

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Calibeliever
15 hours ago, Seti42 said:

Those pictures are fake. The ISS is not even made out of such material. Also, no one would do that. Ever. 

Also, look up the source. "chrisB - NSF" Not at NASA.gov. At nasaspaceflight.com.

 

Except it's not on the ISS it's on the Soyuz.

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