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Amita

Theosophy

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Piney
7 hours ago, Amita said:

This has nothing to do, I suppose, with lost continents, but there is an odd relationship between the Hopi & Tibetan tongues.  I cannot recall exactly, but they were in some way reverse images or sounds of each other.

Tibetan is Sino-Tibetan and related to Chinese. There is no relationship with Hopi. Even their Animism isn't related but the Tibetan Animism shows a relationship with the old Tang belief system.

 They have connected Dine' ( Apache and Navajo) with  Yenisesian but the Dine were later immigrants who crossed over with boats during the Early Woodland Period and were pushed out of the Northwest after a volcanic eruption in Alaska. 

7 hours ago, Amita said:

So what the old Egyptian priest told Solon about Atlantis, who repeated that to Socrates is a fable, you think?  The tale is told in the Critias & Timaeus of Plato.

The theory was the Egyptian was talking about Minoan Crete who they traded with extensively during the Bronze Age and then collapsed after the eruption of Thera and a invasion by the Greeks, but there is no proof that the priest ever existed. 

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Harte

Not to mention the very real fact that Solon never met Socrates, given that Solon died two hundred years before Socrates was born.

Sort of a hole in the theory previously espoused.

Harte

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Harte

Socrates is not the one that told the Atlantis story anyway, as anyone familiar with the dialogues would certainly know.

Harte

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Amita
59 minutes ago, Harte said:

Not to mention the very real fact that Solon never met Socrates, given that Solon died two hundred years before Socrates was born.

Sort of a hole in the theory previously espoused.

No, the hole is in my memory.  I should have called upon the goddess of memory as Critias did, as he begins to recall the story of Solon about the war with Atlantis:

Quote

I must...pay attention to your exhortation and encouragement, and, in addition to

the gods you just named, invoke the other gods and make a special prayer

to Mnemosyne. The success or failure of just about everything that is most

important in our speech lies in the lap of this goddess. For, if we can

sufficiently recall and relate what was said long ago by the priests and

brought here to Athens by Solon, you the audience in our theater will

find, I am confident, that we have put on a worthy performance and

acquitted ourselves of our task. So much said. Now we must act. Let us

delay no more.

 We should recall at the very beginning that, in very rough terms, it was

some nine thousand years since the time when a war is recorded as having

broken out between the peoples [of Atlantis] dwelling outside the pillars of Heracles and all those dwelling within.

 

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Harte

That's some hole, given the title of the work.

Harte

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Amita
6 hours ago, Piney said:

Tibetan is Sino-Tibetan and related to Chinese. There is no relationship with Hopi. Even their Animism isn't related but the Tibetan Animism shows a relationship with the old Tang belief system.

I heard it orally from a lass who heard it etc.  Looks like a rumor that proves false, oh dear me what a surprise.  

This site clarifies.  By the way, they want donations to support the saving of Native languages, are they a trustworthy group?

http://www.native-languages.org/iaq25.htm

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Piney
1 minute ago, Amita said:

This site clarifies.  By the way, they want donations to support the saving of Native languages, are they a trustworthy group?

 

Orrin, I know him. Last time I checked it was. 

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Harte
11 minutes ago, Amita said:

No, the hole is in my memory.  I should have called upon the goddess of memory as Critias did, as he begins to recall the story of Solon about the war with Atlantis:

Actually, the story of his Grandfather (also named Critias) told to Critias third-hand from his Great-Grandfather Dropides talking about a poem Solon supposedly recited at the Festival of Apaturia when Dropides was a young boy going through the process of joining the phratores:

Quote

On the third day, Kureōtis (κουρεῶτις), children born since the last festival were presented by their fathers or guardians to the assembled phratores, and, after an oath had been taken as to their legitimacy and the sacrifice of a goat or a sheep, their names were inscribed in the register. The name κουρεῶτις is derived either from κοῦρος, "young man", i.e., the day of the young, or less probably from κείρω, "to shear", because on this occasion young people cut their hair and offered it to the gods. The sacrificial animal was called μείον. The children who entered puberty also made offerings of wine to Hercules.[citation needed] On this day also it was the custom for boys still at school to declaim pieces of poetry, and to receive prizes.[2][6]

Source

This festival is an example of an occasion where Plato's "Noble Lie" philosophy comes into play. Exactly like he said in The Republic, the Dialogue immediately preceding Timaeus.

It is desirable to teach young children through lies, as long as the lies are for improving the morals of the children.

Apaturia's a nice setting for a fantasy poem that Solon never wrote, but the setting (like so much else in Plato's tale) simply escapes people that crave Atlantis' existence.

Harte

 

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Amita

The Theosophical Tradition is also known as the Perennial Philosophy, which implies that there must be an ancient lineage of theosophists & philosophers.  The late Algis Uzdavinys wrote several important books on this tradition.  Here follow some excerpts from his Golden Chain anthology.  First though, a little from his Introduction:

Quote

The present anthology of the Pythagorean and Platonic tradition disagrees in certain important respects with the modern understanding of philosophy in general and of Platonism and Pythagoreanism in particular. Following the valuable insights of Pierre Hadot (supported by the witness of countless traditional sages throughout the world) we regard ancient philosophy as essentially a way of life: not only inseparable from “spiritual exercises,” but also in perfect accord with cosmogonical myths and sacred rites. In the broader traditional sense, philosophy consists not simply of a conceptual edifice (be it of the order of reason or myth), but of a lived concrete existence conducted by initiates, or by the whole theocentric community, treated as a properly organized and well guided political and theurgical “body” attended to the principle of maat—“truth” and “justice” in the ancient Egyptian sense of the word.

 

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Amita

More from the Introduction to the Golden Chain.

Quote

In Plato’s definition of philosophy as a training for death (Phaedo 67cd) an implicit distinction was made between philosophy and philosophical discourse. Modern Western philosophy (a rather monstrous and corrupted creature, initially shaped by late Christian theology and post-Descartesian logic) has been systematically reduced to a philosophical discourse of a single dogmatic kind, through the fatal one-sidedness of its professed secular humanistic mentality, and a crucial misunderstanding of traditional wisdom.  The task of the ancient philosophers was in fact to contemplate the cosmic order and its beauty; to live in harmony with it and to transcend the limitations imposed by sense experience and discursive reasoning. In a word, it was through philosophy (understood as a kind of askesis) that the cultivation of the natural, ethical, civic, purificatory, theoretic, paradigmatic, and hieratic virtues (aretai) were to be practiced; and it was through this noetic vision (noesis) that the ancient philosophers tried to awaken the divine light within, and to touch the divine Intellect in the cosmos. For them, to reach apotheosis was the ultimate human end (telos).

 

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Harte

Reigle merely asserts that Blavatsky actually did study some Tibetan books and didn't invent eveything that she wrote.

One ironic portion. After stating that

Quote

 

Scholars have not heretofore taken Blavatsky seriously, be-
cause it is generally accepted that she was proven to be a fraud.
There was therefore no reason or need to evaluate her writings."

Reigle goes on to say:

Quote
While we believe that any unbiased investigation will
confirm Blavatsky’s integrity, our concern is with the material
she brought out in her writings, which must stand or fall on its
own merits.

Essentially stating that there's no need to investigate the frauds she perpetrated (and which were documented at the time) on he unwitting victims regarding the seances she conducted.

Harte

 

Edited by Harte
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jaylemurph
On 10/13/2018 at 12:02 PM, Amita said:

The Theosophical Tradition is also known as the Perennial Philosophy, which implies that there must be an ancient lineage of theosophists & philosophers.  The late Algis Uzdavinys wrote several important books on this tradition.  Here follow some excerpts from his Golden Chain anthology.  First though, a little from his Introduction:

 

No, it implies nothing. It suggests nothing more than a population ignorant or self-serving enough to believe in some mythical ancient tradition, the pretenses of which sort Blavatsky!s contemporary Ambrose Bierce skewered mercilessly:

The order was founded at different times by CharlemagneJulius CaesarCyrusSolomonZoroasterConfuciusThothmes, and Buddha. Its emblems and symbols have been found in the Catacombs of Paris and Rome, on the stones of the Parthenon and the Chinese Great Wall, among the temples of Karnak and Palmyra and in the Egyptian Pyramids — always by a Freemason. ~ Ambrose Bierce

—Jaylemurph 

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