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Agishe

An ancient cryptozoological artifact

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Agishe
Piney

It portrays baboon hunting. :tu:

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Agishe
35 minutes ago, Piney said:

It portrays baboon hunting. :tu:

41548480_2148200262105837_80990152000924

:blink:

Edited by Agishe

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Piney

@Agishe They were stylized to be portrayed more human like. Baboons back then were considered a primitive race of humans and harder to hunt than big cats. 

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Agishe
6 minutes ago, Piney said:

@Agishe They were stylized to be portrayed more human like. Baboons back then were considered a primitive race of humans and harder to hunt than big cats. 

Any graphical proof?

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Piney
7 minutes ago, Agishe said:

Any graphical proof?

Not graphical but some of the accounts in the Alexander the Great stories and Greek accounts. Lemme look later. I'm working right now. :tu:

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Agishe
10 minutes ago, Piney said:

Not graphical but some of the accounts in the Alexander the Great stories and Greek accounts. Lemme look later. I'm working right now. :tu:

See also BABOONS IN ANCIENT EGYPTIAN ART by Helena Pio

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Piney
1 minute ago, Agishe said:

See also BABOONS IN ANCIENT EGYPTIAN ART by Helena Pio

Different style of art though. Google  "medieval baboon images". They look like the ones on your OP.

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Piney
11 minutes ago, Agishe said:

See also BABOONS IN ANCIENT EGYPTIAN ART by Helena Pio

Here you go!

Webp.net-resizeimage (6).png

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DodgyDaoist
3 hours ago, Agishe said:

A Scene of hunting for a hairy creatures (quite obvious the folklore characters)
Detail of Phoenician patera, 675-650 BC.

Interesting find:

From an archaeology paper the discription reads: detail of suppression of ape like creatures http://www.bollettinodiarcheologiaonline.beniculturali.it/documenti/generale/5_VELLA.pdf

Also if one looks at the 3rd figure, it appears to be wrecking crops , while standing on 2 legs holding a rock in the other hand as if to throw. That is not the behaviour of baboons or monkeys.

Baboons are scared off farmers crops quite easily with the crack of a whip, nor would baboons raiding crops require warriors and chariots to 'suppress" them.

l
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Piney
17 minutes ago, DodgyDaoist said:

Baboons are scared off farmers crops quite easily with the crack of a whip, nor would baboons raiding crops require warriors and chariots to 'suppress" them.

But they did like to exaggerate their warrior prowess then. I think it was a actual baboon hunt and they weren't chasing off anything. 

19 minutes ago, DodgyDaoist said:

Also if one looks at the 3rd figure, it appears to be wrecking crops , while standing on 2 legs holding a rock in the other hand as if to throw. That is not the behaviour of baboons or monkeys.

Really? :rolleyes:

Do you know much about the behavior of baboons and monkeys? 

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DodgyDaoist
37 minutes ago, Piney said:

Really? :rolleyes:

Do you know much about the behavior of baboons and monkeys? 

Actually yes, I live in Africa, holidayed on a relatives farm, and often as kids we would go and chase the Baboons away from the fruit trees or the small vineyard.

They dont stand on 2 legs, and they dont throw rocks, they generally squat and foriage, the pack is normally docile with the Alpha male being the most aggresive and he normally places himself at an elevated position to observe for approaching danger.

They are generally oportunistic scavangers and prefer seedlings, young shoots and fruit to eat. They dont destroy wheat fields, but sweetcorn is a different story.

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Piney
8 minutes ago, DodgyDaoist said:

Actually yes, I live in Africa, holidayed on a relatives farm, and often as kids we would go and chase the Baboons away from the fruit trees or the small vineyard.

They dont stand on 2 legs, and they dont throw rocks, they generally squat and foriage, the pack is normally docile with the Alpha male being the most aggresive and he normally places himself at an elevated position to observe for approaching danger.

They are generally oportunistic scavangers and prefer seedlings, young shoots and fruit to eat. They dont destroy wheat fields, but sweetcorn is a different story.

The ones that escaped the local safari park in the Pine Barrens were aggressive as hell. Luckily I didn't have to, or accidentally kill one. 

Do you think it might be some form of Mandrill?

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DodgyDaoist
27 minutes ago, Piney said:

The ones that escaped the local safari park in the Pine Barrens were aggressive as hell. Luckily I didn't have to, or accidentally kill one. 

Do you think it might be some form of Mandrill?

Yep, often those from captivity are more aggresive than the wild ones, also depends on how they were treated within captivity.

Mandrill possible, however their current distribution is on the completely opposite side of the continent in relation to Mesopetamia. I say current because who knows what expeditions from that time occured or how far afield they actually ventured.

/ off topic FYI /, This is what some people have to contend with regarding Baboons in my neck of the woods.

 

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oldrover
4 hours ago, Piney said:

Here you go!

Webp.net-resizeimage (6).png

 What the hell is going on on the left? 

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Piney
1 hour ago, oldrover said:

 What the hell is going on on the left? 

Oh, ****! I was doing a quick Google on my lunch break and never looked. :blink:

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Piney
3 hours ago, DodgyDaoist said:

Mandrill possible, however their current distribution is on the completely opposite side of the continent in relation to Mesopetamia. I say current because who knows what expeditions from that time occured or how far afield they actually ventured.

 

We are still discovering range of animals that are no longer in certain areas. We found bison remains on the Northeast Coast of the U.S. dating from the 15th Century only recently. Some in Cape May. 

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stereologist

My African experience is that I was menaced by a pack of baboon sin Kenya. The leader had no problem displaying the size of his canines. As one of the locals had told us, baboons do  not trouble black en - they throw stones, but white men do not throw stones at baboons. I did and was glad of it. It took a while to get the baboons to leave the area. We had backed up almost 100 yards before throwing rocks at a feverish pace. I cannot recall if any of the baboons walked on 2 legs. The broken tail look of baboons is something I won't forget.

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Agishe
19 hours ago, Piney said:

Different style of art though. Google  "medieval baboon images". They look like the ones on your OP.

41611349_2148532035405993_36179465330701

 

Different time. different symbolism. Different animals.
In Maastricht Hours even no baboons. Just some Old World monkeys in human clothes
I don't see any clothes at hairy beings pictured on ancient plate.

The Meaning of my question was: do you have any proof that ancient painters have "portrayed Baboons to looks human like"?

Not about "Maastricht Hours", where, actually, an opposite - humans depicted as monkeys - as a grotesquely comic effect.

Ancients knew how baboons look like:

41709761_2148531065406090_90440580885496

 

 

At medieval times knew too:

 

41697932_2148530985406098_13100730995420

 

 

And hairy beings at plate have nothing common with monkeys in the suits.

 

 

 

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Piney
26 minutes ago, Agishe said:

The Meaning of my question was: do you have any proof that ancient painters have "portrayed Baboons to looks human like"?

 

No, but I'm stlll looking around. I was actually searching for any Phoenician hairy man legends too. 

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Agishe

As I know, there no more images of hairy beings (like in OP) in phoenician art. But maybe I'm wrong.

Edited by Agishe
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Piney
9 minutes ago, Agishe said:

As I know, there no more images of hairy beings (like in OP) in phoenician art. But maybe I'm wrong.

When I was chasing Bigfoot in the Pine Barrens. ( I gave up about 15 years ago) I was reading every legend I could find but I don't remember a Phoenician one. Just the Babylonian story. Then again so  much ancient history and lore was lost or intentionally destroyed. 

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Agishe
16 minutes ago, Piney said:

When I was chasing Bigfoot in the Pine Barrens. ( I gave up about 15 years ago) I was reading every legend I could find but I don't remember a Phoenician one. Just the Babylonian story. Then again so  much ancient history and lore was lost or intentionally destroyed. 

And many more invented, especially in the Middle Ages.

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Razumov

1095574_900.jpg.5bf0ea81e830b8415df5c97bd3d9ca46.jpg

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Agishe

Razumov:

Le Livre et le vraye hystoire du bon roy Alixandre, nice, but it's a medieval.

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