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Possible evidence of the Exodus found in Jordan

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Alien Origins
On 9/27/2018 at 10:24 AM, Grandpa Greenman said:

Biblical Archaeology Society,  might be a bit on the bias side.  

Conformation biased....I don't believe the Jews were ever in Egypt...

 

Edited by Alien Origins

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Piney
1 hour ago, Alien Origins said:

Conformation biased....I don't believe the Jews were ever in Egypt...

 

Neither does any Israeli archaeologist or Rabbinical Scholar. :yes:  

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Grandpa Greenman
3 hours ago, Alien Origins said:

Conformation biased....I don't believe the Jews were ever in Egypt...

 

At the time they are speaking of, I believe, Canaan was a subject of Egypt.  So if they did leave Egypt they essentially ran away to Egypt.  

Abu Simbel temples

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Piney
32 minutes ago, Grandpa Greenman said:

At the time they are speaking of, I believe, Canaan was a subject of Egypt.  So if they did leave Egypt they essentially ran away to Egypt.  

You just gave me a thought. Perhaps it was a memory of their subjugation and they exaggerated like story tellers do.

The Indo-European gods started out as deified ancestors. Look what they became when recorded history began. 

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kmt_sesh
On September 30, 2018 at 5:39 AM, Alien Origins said:

Conformation biased....I don't believe the Jews were ever in Egypt...

 

 

On September 30, 2018 at 7:05 AM, Piney said:

Neither does any Israeli archaeologist or Rabbinical Scholar. :yes:  

They certainly weren't there in 1400 BCE, but there was a sizable Jewish enclave in the Elephantine region of Egypt in the Late Period. This was probably the result of Nebuchadnezzar's sacking of Jerusalem and environs in 589 BCE. The Jews scattered, and a lot of them ended up in Egypt. Many joined the ranks of pharaoh's army, and many were merchants in the Elephantine area. They even built their own temple to Yahweh there. Quite a lot of texts and records survive from the Jewish enclave.

The big problem for the Jewish folks in Elephantine was their habit of sacrificing rams in their temple, which had been the Jewish way for centuries. This was pretty terrible from the perspective of Egyptians in that area, where one of the most important deities was Khnum—a ram-headed god. The Egyptians viewed the Jewish sacrifices as deicide, and they ended up destroying the Jewish temple and chasing away the Jewish population. After that many Jews settled in Alexandria, at the far north end of the country.

So many Jews were certainly there, but not in the Late Bronze Age. We see them emerging on the world stage in the Early Iron Age. and the article kind of hints at this—with new sites popping up in that area of the Levant in the Iron Age. That's historically accurate, and some of the very earliest in the Iron Age can be identified as potentially Hebraic. But the article takes it way too far. Calling these sites "proof" of Exodus is a reckless exaggeration. This smacks of some guys hoping to garner attention and further funding.

There's your pedantic history lesson for the day. You can all wake up now. :D

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kmt_sesh
On September 30, 2018 at 9:57 AM, Grandpa Greenman said:

At the time they are speaking of, I believe, Canaan was a subject of Egypt.  So if they did leave Egypt they essentially ran away to Egypt.  

In the timeframe of 1400 BCEm the Levant was definitely under the sway of Egyptian hegemony. But it didn't stay that way. In the several centuries following that. Egypt lost a lot of control of the Levant. Other empires like the Hittites deeply encroached on former Egyptian vassals, and even Ramesses II couldn't do much about it (although he tried). By around 1100 BCE the Egyptian New Kingdom had crumbled, and many of the great kingdoms in that region had fallen. This created the power vacuum that allowed smaller, minor kingdoms to rise—including the Hebrews. By 1000 BCE the Hebrews were starting to form a nascent kingdom. Biblically speaking, this would be the time of David and Solomon.

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