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Possible evidence of the Exodus found in Jordan

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Jodie.Lynne

@Hanslune

Exactly! and fighting in formation takes time, practice and skill.

Nobody just picks up a sword & shield and becomes Conan the Barbarian.

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Harte
On 6/1/2019 at 11:54 AM, Kenemet said:

I was delving into them recently for a lecture series I'm giving on Wicked Women of Legend and Lore.  I had started out with Lilith (who may be derived from a generic Akkadian word for "demon") but yesterday I was examining Semiramis and how she went from being an Assyrian Queen who was regent for five years until her son ascended the throne to "*W*** of Babylon/Mystery Babylon" and a whole bunch of other things.  (the board's software won't let me type the w-word, but it's a synonym for woman who is a professional sex worker)

If she was old and gray, you could have properly used the word "hoar."

Harte

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Piney
57 minutes ago, Jodie.Lynne said:

@Hanslune

Exactly! and fighting in formation takes time, practice and skill.

Nobody just picks up a sword & shield and becomes Conan the Barbarian.

Every bloody time I hand somebody my blade they friggin cut themselves.......

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Jodie.Lynne
4 minutes ago, Piney said:

Every bloody time I hand somebody my blade they friggin cut themselves.......

LOL!

Yeah, so many people are inept with blades.

Personally, I never leave home without a little cold steel on my person.

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jmccr8
2 hours ago, Hanslune said:

Yes of course.

 

Maybe the forty years applies to how long they were bandits living on the outskirts of civilization.

Hi Hans

I thought they had to wander until all those that were involved in the golden calf affair were dead as they could not enter the promised land. Maybe warfare was a means of hastening their demise.

jmccr8

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Jodie.Lynne
1 minute ago, jmccr8 said:

I thought they had to wander until all those that were involved in the golden calf affair were dead as they could not enter the promised land.

I have also heard this. Also, that 'all the generation that served under Egypt' had to die, so that only those brought up in the belief of 'Yahweh' could enter the "promised land".

Something to do with removing the taint of idol worship (picked up from the Egyptians and the golden calf incident)

 

Just as aside, and not meant to derail the thread, but doesn't that seem to indicate a very weak god to anyone?

I mean, we are told that the Israelites were guided by a dust funnel during the day, and a column of fire by night; they supposedly witnessed the deaths of their pursuers by the hand of their god after he parted the waters for them, yet they still fell back on their idols.

If I were to see manifestations of a god, day in and day out, I'd be very hesitant to want to discard such a being and begin worshipping something else. N'est pas? I mean, does it make any kind of sense for people to witness something, like we are told the Israelites did, and then just fling it on the rubbish pile because the gods spokesman was away for a month and a half?

 

I mean, if Superman showed up in NYC, sent a meteor hurtling back into space, would anyone say "Yeah, nah, I believe in Spiderman"?

 

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Piney
3 minutes ago, Jodie.Lynne said:

Just as aside, and not meant to derail the thread, but doesn't that seem to indicate a very weak god to anyone?

 

Well, after everything I read he did have some "man issues". 

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Jodie.Lynne
1 minute ago, Piney said:

Well, after everything I read he did have some "man issues". 

He is definitely preoccupied with boy bits and who is boffing whom.

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Piney
36 minutes ago, Jodie.Lynne said:

Personally, I never leave home without a little cold steel on my person.

 

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acute
On ‎30‎/‎09‎/‎2018 at 10:47 AM, Hankenhunter said:

Ee'dplebnista norkohn forkohn perfectunun?

This is an English Language forum.  Please refrain from using Welsh.

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Jodie.Lynne
18 minutes ago, acute said:

This is an English Language forum.  Please refrain from using Welsh.

OMFG!

That is from 'Star Trek' the original series, "The Omega Glory" from season 2.

Quote

 

Ee'dplebnista norkohn forkohn perfectunun?

 

"We, the People, In order to form a more perfect Union..."

 

 

 

Uhm, did my inner geek girl just escape and run amok?

Edited by Jodie.Lynne
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acute
9 minutes ago, Jodie.Lynne said:

did my inner geek girl just escape and run amok?

She went crazy and fell off the stage! ;)

 

Edited by acute
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Jodie.Lynne

@acute

Well, I hope she nailed the superhero landing..... :D

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Kenemet
2 hours ago, Jodie.Lynne said:

So, if I have the story right, the Egyptians, fearing the vast multitudes of slaves (for which there is no historical evidence), after a series of alleged supernatural calamities (for which, the Egyptians failed to record), the Pharaoh decides to finally let the slaves depart. BUT, not before allowing them to basically pillage the nation for food and weapons.

It's actually more horrific than that:  Pharaoh said "sure.  Fine.  Go away" three times.  God decides to "harden his heart" and change his mind in order to send more plagues.

 

Quote

Then, the Pharaoh (whom the Israelites failed to name, because, ya know, there was only one Egyptian king...) has a change of heart and takes the bulk of his forces to chase down the slaves in order to return them to captivity. I guess that he forgot that he armed them.

   QUESTION: If the Pharaoh was dead, and most of the army dead, then why didn't Egypt's enemies wipe them out?

In a Cecil B. Demille fashion, Pharaoh and his army are wiped out without a trace, and the Israelites then proceed to wander aimlessly across the desert for 40 years, when they could have easily followed the coastline. Apparently, men NEVER ask for directions!

And finally, the Israelites get to the promised land, but..... They have to eliminate all the indigenous people that happen to live there.

Yeah, there's a lot of genocide in that story.

I'd never thought about it until you mentioned it, but by that time, Egypt had a large standing army of professional soldiers and garrisons and outposts.  Both royal and noble sons went to a military school (in Thebes, if I'm not mistaken), so pharaohs like Thutmoses III were well schooled and well practiced (foreign campaigns) in warfare before they got the throne. 

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Golden Duck
1 hour ago, Jodie.Lynne said:

I have also heard this. Also, that 'all the generation that served under Egypt' had to die, so that only those brought up in the belief of 'Yahweh' could enter the "promised land".

Something to do with removing the taint of idol worship (picked up from the Egyptians and the golden calf incident)

 

Just as aside, and not meant to derail the thread, but doesn't that seem to indicate a very weak god to anyone?

I mean, we are told that the Israelites were guided by a dust funnel during the day, and a column of fire by night; they supposedly witnessed the deaths of their pursuers by the hand of their god after he parted the waters for them, yet they still fell back on their idols.

If I were to see manifestations of a god, day in and day out, I'd be very hesitant to want to discard such a being and begin worshipping something else. N'est pas? I mean, does it make any kind of sense for people to witness something, like we are told the Israelites did, and then just fling it on the rubbish pile because the gods spokesman was away for a month and a half?

 

I mean, if Superman showed up in NYC, sent a meteor hurtling back into space, would anyone say "Yeah, nah, I believe in Spiderman"?

 

Yeah but veal still tastes good.

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Jodie.Lynne
1 hour ago, Kenemet said:

but by that time, Egypt had a large standing army of professional soldiers and garrisons and outposts.  Both royal and noble sons went to a military school (in Thebes, if I'm not mistaken), so pharaohs like Thutmoses III were well schooled and well practiced (foreign campaigns) in warfare before they got the throne. 

My point, exactly.  But I suppose that a well trained and equipped army is no match for a literal deus ex machina.

By Hela's teats, even the Romans underestimated the slave uprising at first, and they were trained gladiators at their core!

Granted that being a pit fighter is no equivalent to a legionnaire, but they seemed to do pretty well for themselves. But the point is that they had training in arms.

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jaylemurph
1 hour ago, Jodie.Lynne said:

I have also heard this. Also, that 'all the generation that served under Egypt' had to die, so that only those brought up in the belief of 'Yahweh' could enter the "promised land".

Something to do with removing the taint of idol worship (picked up from the Egyptians and the golden calf incident)

 

Just as aside, and not meant to derail the thread, but doesn't that seem to indicate a very weak god to anyone?

I mean, we are told that the Israelites were guided by a dust funnel during the day, and a column of fire by night; they supposedly witnessed the deaths of their pursuers by the hand of their god after he parted the waters for them, yet they still fell back on their idols.

If I were to see manifestations of a god, day in and day out, I'd be very hesitant to want to discard such a being and begin worshipping something else. N'est pas? I mean, does it make any kind of sense for people to witness something, like we are told the Israelites did, and then just fling it on the rubbish pile because the gods spokesman was away for a month and a half?

 

I mean, if Superman showed up in NYC, sent a meteor hurtling back into space, would anyone say "Yeah, nah, I believe in Spiderman"?

 

for I the Lord thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me

(Deliberately sourced from the book of Exodus)

So if you **** up, god is so insecure, he’ll torture your perfectly innocent great-grandchildren. That’s, uhh, completely reasonable and rationale, right?

—Jaylemurph 

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Coil
On 5/30/2019 at 9:58 PM, cormac mac airt said:

Using that mindset there’s allegedly a school called Hogwart’s in Scotland. Have you found that yet?

The Bible is a very loose account meant to promote a specific religious agenda. It’s as much fiction as fact. 

cormac 

If science cannot explain the development of nations, then other sources will do it.
Now I understand the Jews more and why they are what they are and why such events happened to them then and at the present time.

The Bible gives a piece of information but a general view of Jews from a height, from the beginning and the process of shaping their knowledge, language and culture comes from other mystical sources.

 

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Hankenhunter
7 hours ago, Jodie.Lynne said:

OMFG!

That is from 'Star Trek' the original series, "The Omega Glory" from season 2.

 

 

Uhm, did my inner geek girl just escape and run amok?

Ha, that took long enough. Congrats Trekkie!  B) 

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Pettytalk
12 hours ago, Jodie.Lynne said:

I seem to remember reading an article that stated that one of the cities destroyed by the Israelites on their meanderings through the Middle East, was given a name that translates as 'heap of ruins'.

The name of the city is recorded as "Ai", and it seems odd that the townspeople chose to name their city "heap of ruins".

Now, for propaganda purposes, I can understand referring to your enemies city as a heap of ruins, to attest to your complete mastery of them, but, wouldn't people record the actual name of their opponents city, for bragging rights?

 

 

They wanted to spare them of given it a bad name, besides the shame of total defeat? 

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Jodie.Lynne
54 minutes ago, Hankenhunter said:

Ha, that took long enough. Congrats Trekkie!  B) 

I didn't see this until it got quoted above. :)

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Pettytalk
12 hours ago, Kenemet said:

You can't really use a modern population with professional soldier and modern armaments as a measure of what people did 3,000 years previously when they were basically wandering shepherd nomads with no professional army (unlike Egypt and other nations around them) and limited access to food and resources.  I understand that guerrilla actions can be quite effective in small areas but a tiny population really can't control any area of any size and is not able to lose a lot of men (unlike larger nations, who can throw cannon fodder at their enemies until they're overwhelmed.)

I cannot match you logic. I was merely hinting the very thing you are pointing out. One cannot assess the exact conditions of those very distant past times looking from the distant future. It's all speculative, if given without having been there, done that, seen that, and heard that.

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Pettytalk
7 hours ago, jaylemurph said:

for I the Lord thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me

(Deliberately sourced from the book of Exodus)

So if you **** up, god is so insecure, he’ll torture your perfectly innocent great-grandchildren. That’s, uhh, completely reasonable and rationale, right?

—Jaylemurph 

Those are the allegories you should be concerned with, as that is pure allegory. What it means it that it takes a while for evil to wear off, and impossible to get rid if it's the same ground, family tree. A bad apple does not fall far enough from the tree. But each time, with the new fruit, it distances itself enough that in four or more seasons, the ground conditions may be better suited to give rise to a better tree which may generate good apples, especially those cross-pollinated. If one want's to kick a drug addiction habit, it's senseless to remain on the same ground frequented by staunch drug addicts.

Atheists are always seeking and demanding to see the evidence for God. Well, there you have it, a bit of evidence. But only if you know what to look for, and are doted by the Creator to come here with open eyes, open heart, and above all, open mind.

Simply put, in a "razor" sharp way, this apparent cruelty and irrational way of God is none other than to let us know that these visitations to the fourth generation are called genetic disorders, or inherited diseases. Since genes are passed from parent to child, any changes to the DNA within a gene are also passed.

The great circle of close-knit European royal families suffer/suffered from an evil which should have been visited, as that evil was close to incest, since they did not want to pollute their "royal" blood with the paupers' blood of their realms, and therefore intermarried with royal relatives. With princes like Harry, hopefully his great-grandchildren will only be visited just for a light pruning of pride, and not to completely uproot them.  

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cormac mac airt
5 hours ago, Coil said:

If science cannot explain the development of nations, then other sources will do it.
Now I understand the Jews more and why they are what they are and why such events happened to them then and at the present time.

The Bible gives a piece of information but a general view of Jews from a height, from the beginning and the process of shaping their knowledge, language and culture comes from other mystical sources.

 

The Bible doesn’t explain much of anything, it makes a lot up. It’s not history, it’s fiction pretending to be. 

cormac

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Harte

Wondering which nations science has not explained the development of.

Harte

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