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rashore

Ogopogo Monster Spotted in Canadian Lake

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rashore
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The Loch Ness monster may get all of the cryptid love and top media coverage, but a video is worth a thousand blurry pictures of log-a-likes. A recent video and multiple recent sightings of another alleged lake monster puts Canada’s Ogopogo at the top of the cryptozoology heap, at least for a few weeks until some armchair explorer searching Google Earth finds another far-away-not-a-stump-but what-is-it Nessie photo without setting foot in Scotland.

https://mysteriousuniverse.org/2018/10/ogopogo-monster-spotted-multiple-times-in-canadian-lake/

 

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Iilaa'mpuul'xem

When I read this report and saw that it was two brothers David and Keith, it reminded me of the time the two brothers had the video of the San Francisco brides sea serpent... Bill and Bob, I think they were called... I may be wrong, they even joined us on UM to comment on their sightings, if I remember rightly? 

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stereologist

I followed one of the links to one of the most interesting photos of a lake monster I've ever seen.

https://ogopogoquest.com/sightings.php

It looks like an object and not a wave.  Wonder what it is.

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Myles
4 hours ago, stereologist said:

I followed one of the links to one of the most interesting photos of a lake monster I've ever seen.

https://ogopogoquest.com/sightings.php

It looks like an object and not a wave.  Wonder what it is.

 None of those pics are very good.   As in they do not show indisputable proof of something.  A couple look like something besides a wave, but they also could just be a wave.  

 

About the lake:

Okanagan Lake is a large, deep lake in the Okanagan Valley of British Columbia, Canada. The lake is 135 km (84 mi) long, between 4 and 5 km (2.5 and 3.1 mi) wide, and has a surface area of 348 km2.[

Okanagan Lake is called a fjord lake as it has been carved out by repeated glaciations. Although the lake contains numerous lacustrine terraces, it is not uncommon for the lake to be 100 m deep only 10 m offshore.[6] Major inflows include Mission, Vernon, Trout, Penticton, Equesis, Kelowna, Peachland and Powers Creeks.[7] The lake is drained by the Okanagan River, which exits the lake's south end via a canal through the city of Penticton to Skaha Lake, whence the river continues southwards into the rest of the South Okanagan and through Okanogan County, Washington to its confluence with the Columbia.

The lake's maximum depth is 232 metres (761 ft) near Grant Island (Nahun Weenox). There is one other island known as Rattlesnake Island, much farther south by Squally Point. Some areas of the lake have up to 750 metres (2,460 ft) of glacial and post-glacial sediment fill which were deposited during the Pleistocene Epoch

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Podo

Okanagan Lake is huge, and super deep, but there is zero chance that a lake monster lives in it. Everyone from the area knows someone who has "seen the monster" or something along those lines, but it is not something that is usually taken seriously, other than to attract tourists. That being said, "sturgeon" is a bad explanation for any such sightings since there are no confirmed sturgeon in Okanagan lake. Sturgeon exist in the Columbia River and so in theory could have made it into the lake, but it was dammed up in the 50's and the chances are unlikely. More likely is floating detritus or somesuch, since there isn't anything very big hanging out in the lake.

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Kittens Are Jerks
2 hours ago, Myles said:

None of those pics are very good.   As in they do not show indisputable proof of something.  A couple look like something besides a wave, but they also could just be a wave.  

Long, weird-looking waves like those in the photos are not unusual in Lake Okanagan.

The lake (including it's deepest part) has been searched several times using high tech equipment, but no evidence of an Ogopogo has ever been found.

 

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Kittens Are Jerks
7 hours ago, stereologist said:

I followed one of the links to one of the most interesting photos of a lake monster I've ever seen.

https://ogopogoquest.com/sightings.php

It looks like an object and not a wave.  Wonder what it is.

Thanks for the additional link. As mentioned, it's just a wave, but such waves sometimes look like an Ogopogo, right down to it's signature humps.

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Piney
3 hours ago, Kittens Are Jerks said:

Thanks for the additional link. As mentioned, it's just a wave, but such waves sometimes look like an Ogopogo, right down to it's signature humps.

It was probably the "personification" of a wave event. Like our other mythical creatures, a personification of nature and human nature

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Avalanche

Are they sure it wasn't  a oompa loompa

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Trelane
Posted (edited)

Beautiful pictures of lake waves. Or is it from a Sasquatch cannonball into the lake???:P

Edited by Trelane
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Tatetopa
6 hours ago, Trelane said:

Beautiful pictures of lake waves. Or is it from a Sasquatch cannonball into the lake???:P

You can always  tell a Sasquatch disturbance  by the floating clump of tangled hair it leaves behind on the lake.

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MERRY DMAS

That's some wave of sightings goin on in that lake.

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Lord Harry

Is anyone aware of whether there is enough food in the lake to support a breeding population of large aquatic Cryptids?

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CryptidSeeker

Thats sick I didnt realise it was a real thing! I thought theyd made it up on venture bros

 

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Lord Harry

I believe I may have had a sea serpent sighting myself a number of years ago.  I will be posting a thread describing the incident shortly.

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glorybebe
11 hours ago, Lord Harry said:

Is anyone aware of whether there is enough food in the lake to support a breeding population of large aquatic Cryptids?

No, there is not.  I live not far from this lake.  Locals are laughing about it.  Hundreds of years ago the natives in this area as well as on Kootenay Lake said there was monsters in the lakes.  Myths start to explain weird occurances.  I do know gigantic sturgeon were plentiful in both lakes at one time.  Looking at their faces, it would be easy to see why stories could start and be repeated as hunting tales.  

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Lord Harry

What is needed would be an extensive sonar surveillance of the lake in a similar manner to that which was conducted at Loch Ness during the 1980s. Interestingly enough, I recall reading a crypto-blog which proposes a very plausible theory for the identity of the Loch Ness Monster. That of a large 20-25ft unidentified species of salamander. This would negate the requirements of having to surface regularly for air, and would fit the description of many sightings dating back centuries.

I will post the link when I get to my lap top. This hypothetical animal could perhaps also explain other Lake Monster sightings. Including Ogopogo.

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Carnoferox
2 hours ago, Lord Harry said:

What is needed would be an extensive sonar surveillance of the lake in a similar manner to that which was conducted at Loch Ness during the 1980s. Interestingly enough, I recall reading a crypto-blog which proposes a very plausible theory for the identity of the Loch Ness Monster. That of a large 20-25ft unidentified species of salamander. This would negate the requirements of having to surface regularly for air, and would fit the description of many sightings dating back centuries.

I will post the link when I get to my lap top. This hypothetical animal could perhaps also explain other Lake Monster sightings. Including Ogopogo.

The "giant salamander" hypothesis is not plausible. While there were giant salamanders (family Cryptobranchidae) at higher latitudes in North America and Eurasia during various warm periods in the Cenozoic, they went extinct as the climate cooled in the Pliocene.

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Lord Harry
17 minutes ago, Carnoferox said:

The "giant salamander" hypothesis is not plausible. While there were giant salamanders (family Cryptobranchidae) at higher latitudes in North America and Eurasia during various warm periods in the Cenozoic, they went extinct as the climate cooled in the Pliocene.

I'm not saying I necessarily believe it either. Simply that I find it to be the most plausible hypothesis thus far proposed, assuming Lake Monsters are actual cryptids. I will have to do some research on salamanders. I know a species of giant salamander does thrive in the temperate regions of China.

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Lord Harry

In more remote areas, where humans rarely frequent, the giant long necked seal hypothesis could work in many instances.

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Lord Harry

As promised. 

http://thelochnessgiantsalamander.blogspot.com/

I recommend reading through the blog posts in order.  As there is some very interesting information contained within. Much of which appears to be plausible.

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Carnoferox
17 minutes ago, Lord Harry said:

I'm not saying I necessarily believe it either. Simply that I find it to be the most plausible hypothesis thus far proposed, assuming Lake Monsters are actual cryptids. I will have to do some research on salamanders. I know a species of giant salamander does thrive in the temperate regions of China.

You're thinking of the Chinese giant salamander (Andrias davidianus), which is restricted to fast-flowing montane streams in China and is now endangered in the wild. The Japanese giant salamander (A. japonicus) inhabits similar streams in Japan. Lowland cryptobranchids that preferred ponds and lakes are now all extinct. There is additionally the problem of size; the largest known salamander (A. matthewi) had a max length of 7.5 feet, far from 20-25 feet.

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Piney
Posted (edited)
On 10/7/2018 at 10:09 AM, Lord Harry said:

Is anyone aware of whether there is enough food in the lake to support a breeding population of large aquatic Cryptids?

That has been one of the proofs that it probably doesn't exist to me. 

1 hour ago, Lord Harry said:

In more remote areas, where humans rarely frequent, the giant long necked seal hypothesis could work in many instances.

The laws of physiology would rule it out. It's spine would have to be seriously modified and so would it's shoulder joints, including tendons, bones and muscle structure.  

I use to think it might of been some form of basilosauridae but there is still the food issue. 

Edited by Piney
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Carnoferox
28 minutes ago, Piney said:

That has been one of the proofs that it probably doesn't exist to me. 

The laws of physiology would rule it out. It's spine would have to be seriously modified and so would it's shoulder joints, including tendons, bones and muscle structure.  

I use to think it might of been some form of basilosauridae but there is still the food issue. 

The "longneck seal" hypothesis is somewhat plausible, since there is a potential ancestor in the swan-necked seal (Acrophoca spp.).

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Piney
32 minutes ago, Carnoferox said:

The "longneck seal" hypothesis is somewhat plausible, since there is a potential ancestor in the swan-necked seal (Acrophoca spp.).

Thanks!

Had to Google that one. They aren't very well known at all. Only found one picture.

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