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Amita

To dare, to know, to will, and be silent

92 posts in this topic

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Piney
4 minutes ago, Amita said:

Not a 'primary' interest, but I do pay attention to all sorts of historical evidences from their digs.  Just do not put all my rocks in one basket.

I keep it very rounded. I want to know language, culture and history. You can't know a ethnic group or their spiritual traditions without knowing everything else. I learned Kipchak and studied Central Asia So I could learn about the Yellow Path. My uncle taught me NihonGo when he taught me Shorin Ryu and Tendai Philosophy.  

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The Wistman

Soto here, FWIW.  Mom was Roman Catholic (tried to make me one too).  Dad liked Krishnamurti (the late stuff)

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Piney
23 minutes ago, The Wistman said:

  Dad liked Krishnamurti (the late stuff)

I always thought he was a Buddhist, but Krishnamurti's late stuff is something I can appreciate. "Follow your own path, you don't need a guru" and broke away from the Theosophist's millenarian crap. 

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The Wistman
43 minutes ago, Piney said:

I always thought he was a Buddhist, but Krishnamurti's late stuff is something I can appreciate. "Follow your own path, you don't need a guru" and broke away from the Theosophist's millenarian crap. 

Yes.  He was groomed by the Theosophists as their princeling, their anointed Next Great Man.  But the death of his beloved brother sent him into a tail-spin psychologically, and when he emerged he had changed.  He abandoned spiritual Yoga-like practices except for maintaining mental and physical health (which angered many, even to this day of course).  He proclaimed 'belief' to be a danger, and that one must be wary of it.  And he went beyond the Buddhists with their pointing at desire and regret as the bases of human psychological suffering, focusing the underlying blame for suffering on the human architecture of 'time' under which all desires and regrets arise, and from them all frustrations and all clinging.  There is on Youtube an informal debate (from the sixties I think) between an aged Krishnamurti and Chogyam Trungpa, which is interesting...though it is Krishnamurti who does most of the talking, Trungpa stays mostly quiet...as I remember it that is.

Edited by The Wistman
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Amita
1 hour ago, Piney said:

I learned Kipchak and studied Central Asia So I could learn about the Yellow Path.

I have a slight familiarity with Lama Glenn Mullin, a Geluk or Yellow Hat Buddhist.  He lives in Mongolia when not traveling & teaching around the planet.  He may know more about the Mongolian Yellow Path than most.  He has a website.

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The Wistman
22 minutes ago, Amita said:

I have a slight familiarity with Lama Glenn Mullin, a Geluk or Yellow Hat Buddhist.  He lives in Mongolia when not traveling & teaching around the planet.  He may know more about the Mongolian Yellow Path than most.  He has a website.

Here's a photo of Nicholas Roerich (L) and his son George (R) in 1933, Gobi Desert, Mongolia.  The in situ glyphs of the Buddhist Three Treasures sigil, Roerich adapted to use as the symbol for his foundation The Nicholas Roerich Society and for his Roerich Pact, which was an act of the League of Nations that strove to preserve important cultural monuments and structures in times of war.  Sadly, it didn't last for long.  The photo below shows Roerich's own version of the sigil, which was the three dot triangle but surrounded by a circle, which he'd painted on that rock.

5bb8f7af69758_roerichmongolia.jpg.6a6dc6731cd70358a4dd017d90fc8b4a.jpg

Roerich (a distinguished Russian artist and polymath) and his wife Helena were affiliated with Blavatsky and other contemporary spiritualist movements.  His son, George (Yuri), compiled the first Tibetan/Russian/English dictionary.  His other son, Svetislav, became a distinguished fine artist like his father.

5bb8f83dccc8e_roerichmongolia-three-treasures.jpg.9b6de9261e35f8d14afa8b0e9ced4dec.jpg

Roerich's 1933 photo of the Gobi boulders with their in situ "Three Treasures" sigils...note without the circle.

roerich-mongolia-stones.jpg.9e59695aec1355297c743f93954c8221.jpg

Roerich's painting of same.

Edited by The Wistman
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Piney
38 minutes ago, Amita said:

I have a slight familiarity with Lama Glenn Mullin, a Geluk or Yellow Hat Buddhist.  He lives in Mongolia when not traveling & teaching around the planet.  He may know more about the Mongolian Yellow Path than most.  He has a website.

It's the the Shamanism I was interested in. It's been revived among the Kazakhs.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yellow_shamanism

Edited by Piney
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Piney

@The Wistman

Here's a nutshot at Turkey and Erdogan's Muslim nonsense.

 

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The Wistman

As an addendum, in Mongolian and Tibetan Buddhism, the symbol for the soul is Lung Ta...the wind horse.  It was this horse that carried the Cintimani stone on its back (the wish fulfilling jewel in Buddhism and Hinduism).  Here's Nicholas Roerich's painting of it:

5bb91668d7cd4_lungta.jpg.6291078e1031d4bd99ed56496817a1c0.jpg

By the way, I'm in the fine art business.  In case you're wondering these paintings by N. Roerich may seem like fringe to you, but I assure you that you'd need to compete with many collectors to acquire one, and it would cost you dearly to win its ownership.

 

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Amita
49 minutes ago, The Wistman said:

As an addendum, in Mongolian and Tibetan Buddhism, the symbol for the soul is Lung Ta...the wind horse.  It was this horse that carried the Cintimani stone on its back (the wish fulfilling jewel in Buddhism and Hinduism).  Here's Nicholas Roerich's painting of it:

5bb91668d7cd4_lungta.jpg.6291078e1031d4bd99ed56496817a1c0.jpg

By the way, I'm in the fine art business.  In case you're wondering these paintings by N. Roerich may seem like fringe to you, but I assure you that you'd need to compete with many collectors to acquire one, and it would cost you dearly to win its ownership.

True, but if a quality print will do, the Roerich Museum in NYC sells many - even postcard size ones.

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Piney
3 hours ago, The Wistman said:

As an addendum, in Mongolian and Tibetan Buddhism, the symbol for the soul is Lung Ta...the wind horse.  It was this horse that carried the Cintimani stone on its back (the wish fulfilling jewel in Buddhism and Hinduism).  Here's Nicholas Roerich's painting of it:

 

Ruzgar Tayi (sic) It's the Mongolian national symbol. It might have Eastern Iranian origins.

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The Wistman
4 hours ago, Amita said:

True, but if a quality print will do, the Roerich Museum in NYC sells many - even postcard size ones.

Absolutely.  And you can see many of his masterful paintings yourself while there.  ;) 

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jaylemurph
13 hours ago, Amita said:

Ah, thank you J;  so the mind is the brain. 

I will leave your neuronic self in peace, since I have no urge to be 'right'.

Odd: one would think smugness would be a downright roadblock for the superiorly spiritual, but it seems you're using it as an effective boulevard. Still, what's the point of having spirituality if you can't weaponize it and hold it over others?

--Jaylemurph

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Amita
On 10/5/2018 at 4:52 PM, Amita said:

... the "G [three dot triangle]  A [three dot triangle]", so I thought maybe the G A was some Masonic reference to the Grand Architect.  

Turns out, with a little more reading in that book, that G A stands for Great Arcanum.

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Jenn8779
On 10/6/2018 at 10:52 AM, Piney said:

I wish there was a middle finger emoji.....

People think so. The "advisor" to the show witnessed the opening scene with the kids ( which didn't happen that way) and I had a cousin which I adopted and was killed. But not because of me as portrayed.

 @Jenn8779 can tell you I was good at busting down doors and messing people up who abused their girlfriends or tried raping someone at "The Pit", which was a former DuPont toxic waste dump.

Most definitely can back that statement. Only too many girls can be thankful he was watching out for them... I'm sure he'll tell you it was because he was brought up by strong women in a matriarchal society but honestly? I believe he's simply a good man who would be the way he is no matter how he was raised :yes:

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Jenn8779
On 10/6/2018 at 11:08 AM, Piney said:

After I was railroaded and went to prison Doreen and other politically involved Indians had to "demonize" me. I tried returning to the museum but the new curator was told I was probably the one who stole my bosses chainsaws and that I was a "drug enforcer". 

Ugh!!!

@Piney laying out some drug enforcer out cold? Yep..... believe it absolutely.

Piney being a drug dealer or enforcer? Um no, just no. Point of fact.... HELL NO!!! Dumb@$$es....sigh

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kmt_sesh
On October 5, 2018 at 6:05 PM, XenoFish said:

Wouldn't this thread be better in the New Age section?

I would have to agree, this is not an ancient mystery or alternative history. i've been wondering why it was put in this section, so I'm going to move it now.

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