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UM-Bot

How does fluid 'climb' up a rod ?

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UM-Bot

Physics Girl checks out a remarkable effect achievable with non-newtonian fluids.

 

  • Haha 1

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RoofGardener

Umm... capillary action ? 

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Ozymandias

Nothing to do with capillary action. That requires a narrow tube-like hollow up which a liguid flows. Capillary action is what allows plants to draw water upwards from the earth.

This is a solid rod around the outside of which a non-newtonian fluid spirals upwards. Its caused by the centripetal effect on the fluid of the rotating rod.

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ChrLzs

Many substances will do that - including some pretty basic cake mixtures that will annoyingly climb up the beaters...

Without watching the video, so I apologise if I'm repeating something... isn't this just basic ionic and covalent adhesion?

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devilmaycare

Actually the Japanese(?), I believe, have designed hi-rise buildings that use no traditional plumbing, ie, electricity/pumps to get the water source from ground level to the top floors by designing plant-like vein 'conduits' into the structure itself. If I'm correct it's like an absorbent lattice work that slowly but inexorably pulls the water up. Gotta love the Japanese.

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