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Hawking's final book answers the big questions

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Seti42

I'd give it a read. but I don't expect much, tbh. It sounds like a vague and shallow collection of thoughts published by his family to make some sweet posthumous cash.

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sci-nerd

I love and respect Hawking very much, but like Einstein, I think he's a bit too scientifically conservative.

Like Einstein he also lost the greatest ideological struggle of his career, but is still a true genius.

RIP my hero! :wub:

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spartan max2
23 minutes ago, sci-nerd said:

 

Like Einstein he also lost the greatest ideological struggle of his career

What do you mean by this? I'm not too familiar 

Edited by spartan max2

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sci-nerd
4 minutes ago, spartan max2 said:

What do you mean by this? I'm not too familiar 

Hawking vs Susskind  on what happens beyond the event horizon. Susskind won the argument.

Einstein's was with Bohr about QM.

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danydandan
3 minutes ago, sci-nerd said:

Hawking vs Susskind  on what happens beyond the event horizon. Susskind won the argument.

Einstein's was with Bohr about QM.

There is a very big difference in admitting you were incorrect, and sticking to your narrative when evidence supports it's wrong.

Hawking conceded the bet, and he believed he was probably incorrect.

Einstein stuck to his 'God don't play dice' stick until he died.

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sci-nerd
6 minutes ago, danydandan said:

There is a very big difference in admitting you were incorrect, and sticking to your narrative when evidence supports it's wrong.

Hawking conceded the bet, and he believed he was probably incorrect.

Einstein stuck to his 'God don't play dice' stick until he died.

I believe his remark: Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one - is a gesture to admit defeat. Or maybe not?

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OverSword

Is one of the questions answered, "When did the real Steven Hawking die?" :ph34r:

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Calibeliever
1 hour ago, danydandan said:

There is a very big difference in admitting you were incorrect, and sticking to your narrative when evidence supports it's wrong.

Hawking conceded the bet, and he believed he was probably incorrect.

Einstein stuck to his 'God don't play dice' stick until he died.

And the jury may still be out on the last. After all, even though Einstein called it a 'blunder', the cosmological constant was added back in in the 90's ... :)  who knows what else we have left to discover ?

Edited by Calibeliever

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sci-nerd
1 hour ago, danydandan said:

Einstein stuck to his 'God don't play dice' stick until he died.

He also said: Hence it is clear that the space of physics is not, in the last analysis, anything given in nature or independent of human thought.

I believe your judgement on his final position is wrong.

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sci-nerd
34 minutes ago, Calibeliever said:

the cosmological constant was added back in in the 90's

It was withdrawn later. The only constants we have nowadays, I believe, are the physical constants, like Sommerfeld's.

Edited by sci-nerd

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danydandan
10 minutes ago, sci-nerd said:

He also said: Hence it is clear that the space of physics is not, in the last analysis, anything given in nature or independent of human thought.

I believe your judgement on his final position is wrong.

Read his last paper, he was still trying to come up with a way to remove uncertainty.

Edited by danydandan

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Hankenhunter

I would have very much enjoyed meeting, and talking with the man. It was a loss to science when he passed. So many questions, so little time. Rest in peace, Mr. Scrunchy. (My daughters nickname for him when she was small)

Hank

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