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UM-Bot

World's 'largest living thing' is slowly dying

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sci-nerd

@UM-Bot do you mean 8,000 or 80,000 ?

Edited by sci-nerd

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justin3651

Sounds like mule deer and cattle grazing is the problem based off other articles. Luckily mule deer are delicious and cattle are ok tasting. Time to do some emergency hunting and some emergency cattle slaughter. 

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Stiff
9 minutes ago, sci-nerd said:

8,000 or 80,000 ?

According to the article... 

 "Thought to be up to 80,000 years old"

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sci-nerd
1 minute ago, Stiff said:

According to the article... 

 "Thought to be up to 80,000 years old"

I somehow managed not to see that. Thanks!

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OverSword

honey fungus measuring 2.4 miles (3.8 km) across in the Blue Mountains in Oregon is thought to be the largest living organism on Earth.

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Buzz_Light_Year
2 hours ago, justin3651 said:

Sounds like mule deer and cattle grazing is the problem based off other articles. Luckily mule deer are delicious and cattle are ok tasting. Time to do some emergency hunting and some emergency cattle slaughter. 

One of the reason Wolves were re-introduced to Yellowstone as the Elk were browsing unabated and new tree growth was almost non-existent.

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Grandpa Greenman

:cry:  That is sad, the thing has lived for 80,000 years with Native Americans and the white man comes along a kills it in a few hundred years.    

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Unfortunately
40 minutes ago, Grandpa Greenman said:

:cry:  That is sad, the thing has lived for 80,000 years with Native Americans and the white man comes along a kills it in a few hundred years.    

Civilised man would be more accurate,  not specifically white man although we're talking about America. The growth of a human civilisation is detrimental to everything except humans, that's why we've inevitably turned into a parasitic race in comparison to the rest of the animal kingdom. It's unfortunate and I hope we can eventually adapt to a better way of living that's easier on the planet but I'm doubtful we have the ability now that we've left it so late. :unsure:

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Tatetopa

There is a rather sad story about a forester who got his core sampler stuck in a bristlecone pine tree in 1964.  Rangers said, "We have a bunch of those, we'll cut it down and get your sampler back.  The guys name was Donal Curry.  When he counted the rings, he found the tree to be almost 5,000 years old.  They have not found an older one since then.

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DieChecker
16 hours ago, OverSword said:

honey fungus measuring 2.4 miles (3.8 km) across in the Blue Mountains in Oregon is thought to be the largest living organism on Earth.

I thought I remembered that too. Maybe this tree colony is more massive, but covers a lot less area?

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paperdyer

Aspen is a pretty hardy tree. I'm sure the soil has been checked.  After that many years the root systems of the trees may be stealing from each other.  Maybe the species can be saved with cloning of some sort or splicing with another aspen that's younger.

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